For years companies have invested in customer loyalty through programs, incentives, customer service operations and more. Meanwhile, not nearly as much attention has been placed on a segment that has proven, direct correlations to customer retention: employee engagement and loyalty.

As we've done with customer loyalty, coupons, millennial loyalty and others, we felt it Access-Perks-employee-discount-program.pngwould be useful to compile relevant statistics on employee engagement and loyalty.

By relevant, we mean US-based research and surveys released in the past few years (if it's older than 2010 we've provided a notation). Each employee engagement statistic has a link back to the original source when possible, or a reputable media citation otherwise.

Looking through these you'll see some trends emerge, or in some cases, conflicting data. We'll leave those for you to interpret which is most accurate. We've broken them up into categories:

We'll keep the page updated regularly with new research. If there's a statistic you're looking for but can't find, leave us a note in the comments and we'll see what we can do to help.

This data is compiled on behalf of Access Perks, our employee discount program geared for small- and medium-sized businesses. Click here to learn more about Access Perks

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Employee Retention & Engagement Statistics

  • 34.1% of American workers are engaged (Gallup
  • 49.5% of employees are "not engaged" and 16.5% are "actively disengaged" (Gallup
  • 29% of millennials are engaged at work, 16% are actively disengaged, 55% are not engaged (Gallup)
  • 74% of all workers are satisfied with their jobs; 66% of those are still open to new employment (Jobvite
  • 37% of employees indicated they were “very satisfied” and 51% “somewhat satisfied” with their jobs (SHRM)
  • 86% of employees say they're at least somewhat happy with their jobs, 43% are very happy, just 4% very unhappy (Staples)
  • 67% of employees are extremely or very satisfied with their jobs (Aflac
  • Engagement levels are consistent across every generation (Modern Survey
  • $11 billion is lost annually due to employee turnover (Bloomberg BNA) (Commonly cited statistic, source link unfound) 
  • Millennial turnover costs the U.S. economy $30.5 billion annually (Gallup)
  • Total turnover in 2014: 15.7% of the workforce (Compensation Force
  • Total voluntary turnover in 2014: 11% of the workforce (Compensation Force
  • Cost of replacing entry level employees: 30-50% of their annual salary (ERE Media
  • Cost of replacing mid-level employees: 150% of their annual salary (ERE Media
  • Cost of replacing high-level or highly specialized employees: 400% of their annual salary (ERE Media
  • 44% of Millennials say, if given the choice, they expect to leave their current employers in the next two years (Deloitte
  • 50% of Millennials (compared with 60% of non-millennials) strongly agree that they plan to be working at their company one year from now (Gallup)
  • 42% of millennials expect to change jobs at least every 1-3 years (Jobvite
  • Industries with highest turnover in 2014: Hospitality (20.2%), Banking & Finance (13.3%), Healthcare (13%), Insurance (11.2%) (Compensation Force
  • The industries with the highest employee engagement are heavy manufacturing and financial services (Modern Survey
  • The industries with most disengaged workers at hospitality, government and light manufacturing (Modern Survey
  • Companies that increase their number of talented managers and double the rate of engaged employees achieve, on average, 147% higher earnings per share than their competition (Gallup)
  • 45% of employees reported that they would be likely or very likely to look for other jobs outside their current organization within the next year (SHRM)
  • 45% of employees plan to stay at their jobs for at least another year (MetLife)
  • 1 in 3 workers will change jobs in the next 6 months (Saba Software
  • Each year the average company loses 20-50% of its employee base (Bain & Company) (Commonly cited statistic, source link unfound) 
  • States with the highest percentages of engaged employees: Montana (39%), Mississippi (37%), Louisiana (36%) (Gallup
  • States with the lowest percentages of engaged employees: Connecticut (21%), New York (21%), Michigan (21%) (Gallup
  • Cities with highest percentage of engaged workers: San Antonio (38.1%), Oklahoma City (37.6%), Riverside, Cali. (36.8%) and Tulsa (36.3%) (Gallup
  • Cities with lowest percentage of engaged employees: Buffalo (23.5%), San Jose (24.7%), Minneapolis (24.9%), DC (25.9%) (Gallup
  • 33% of senior leaders believe employee loyalty has a direct relationship to profits (American Management Association
  • Customer retention rates are 18% higher on average when employees are highly engaged (Cvent
  • Almost 50% of organizations fail to measure employees’ engagement with the customer or the brand (Edelman
  • 32% of US workers were engaged with their employers in 2015, up from 31.5% in 2014 (Gallup
  • 16% of workers in the US are “fully engaged" (Modern Survey
  • Only 13% of employees are engaged worldwide (Gallup
  • 23% of employees are "Disengaged" (Modern Survey
  • 21% of sales employees are “Fully Engaged” compared with only 13% of non-sales employees (Modern Survey
  • The number of highly and moderately engaged employees in the U.S. increased from 55% last year to 57% this year (Temkin Group
  • Only 1 in 150 employees who say their organization does not have a set of values are fully engaged (Modern Survey
  • 33% of women are engaged with their employers, 28% of men (Gallup
  • 63% of young females agree that employees should stay in their first job between 2-3 years, compared to 54% of males (Adecco)
  • 58% of women without young children would rather work outside the home (Gallup
  • 47% of employees report feeling very loyal to their company (Metlife
  • 53% of employees say they will be with their current employer one year from now (Mercer
  • 31% say they changed jobs in the past three years (Gallup
  • 21% of millennials say they've changed jobs within the past year, more than 3x the number of non-millennials (Gallup)
  • 40% of companies are reporting loss of personnel as a top concern (SHRM) 
  • The top three challenges faced by HR organizations today are turnover, employee engagement, and succession planning (SHRM
  • 80% of HR pros say that employee engagement is an important area of focus for their organization (Temkin Group)
  • 49% of HR leaders named retention and leadership development programs as the top priority among talent management goals (Saba Software
  • Belief in senior leadership is the strongest engagement driver, growth & development is the second (Modern Survey
  • 60% of HR leaders believe that their companies provide employees with a clear career path; just 36% of employees agree (Saba Software
  • 32% of employers have seen an increase in retention as a result of increasing their educational requirements (CareerBuilder
  • 25% of employers have seen an increase in customer loyalty as a result of increasing employee educational requirements (CareerBuilder
  • 59% of employees say they can "grow and develop" at their organization (Modern Survey
  • 27% of workers strongly agree that the feedback they currently receive helps them do their work better (Gallup
  • Employees who are supervised by highly engaged managers are 59% more likely to be engaged (Gallup
  • Engagement plummets to 2% among teams with managers who ignore their employees, compared 61% for teams led by managers who focus on strengths (Gallup
  • 68% of employees say their managers aren't actively engaged in their career development (Right Management
  • Teams led by managers who focus on their weaknesses are 26% less likely to be engaged (Gallup
  • Employees who believe their managers can name their strengths are 71% more likely to feel engaged and energized (The VIA Institute on Character
  • Business units with high employee engagement have 28% less internal theft and 21% higher productivity (Gallup
  • Highly engaged employees are:
    • 2.5 times more likely to stay at work late if something needs to be done after the normal workday ends 
    • more than twice as likely to help someone at work even if they don’t ask for help 
    • more than three times as likely to do something good for the company that is not expected of them 
    • more than five times as likely to recommend that a friend or relative apply for a job at their company (Temkin Group
  • Employees who are engaged and have high well-being are:
    • 42% more likely to evaluate their overall lives highly 
    • 27% more likely to report "excellent" performance in their own job at work 
    • 27% more likely to report "excellent" performance by their organization 
    • 45% more likely to report high levels of adaptability in the presence of change 
    • 37% more likely to report always recovering "fully" after illness, injury or hardship 
    • 59% less likely to look for a job with a different organization in the next 12 months 
    • 18% less likely to change employers in a 12-month period 
    • 19% more likely to volunteer their time in the past month (Gallup
  • Actively disengaged workers are nearly twice as likely as engaged workers to have been diagnosed with depression (Gallup
  • 26% of employees admit to sharing sensitive information outside the company (Sailpoint
  • 38% of employers say lack of qualified talent results in the most productivity lost within their organization (Aflac
  • Higher workplace engagement leads to 37% lower absenteeism, 41% fewer safety incidents, and 41% fewer quality defects (Gallup
  • On a monthly basis, actively disengaged employees have 2.17 unhealthy days, compared with 1.25 unhealthy days for engaged employees (Gallup
  • 91% of highly engaged employees always or almost always try their hardest at work, compared with 67% of disengaged employees (Temkin Group
  • 92% of employees said that they are at least “somewhat happy” (Spherion
  • 33% of employees knew whether they would stay at their company long-term after being on the job for one week or less; 63% had decided within the first month (Ultimate Software
  • Companies highest performing employees have three things in common: talent, engagement, and 10+ years of service (Gallup
  • 21% of employees who have been with one company for 10+ years are disengaged, more than any other tenure period (Gallup
  • 33% of workers who have been with a company less than three years are engaged, compared with 29% of those who have been with a company 3-9 years and 30% of those who have been with a company for over 10 (Gallup
  • Companies with formal employee engagement programs experience higher annual revenue, revenue from customer referrals, attainment of annual sales quotas, and improvement in annual customer service cost than companies without (Aberdeen)
  • 55% of organizations have an explicit employee engagement strategy (Edelman
  • Among those that do have a strategy, 86% of senior leaders are familiar with it, along with only 65% of managers and 38% of employees (Edelman
  • The main factor in workplace discontent is not wages, benefits or hours, but the boss (Gallup
  • 28% of employees would rather have a better boss than a $5,000 raise (Randstad) 
  • 1 in 5 employees would prefer to receive a promotion (higher title included) without a 3% raise, rather than getting that raise without a promotion (BambooHR)
  • Nearly one-third of employees would rather be recognized in a company-wide email from an executive than receive a bonus of $500 (BambooHR)
  • 30% more of the workforce is satisfied when there’s even an informal recognition program in place (BambooHR)
  • 75% of employees receiving at least monthly recognition (even if informal) are satisfied with their job (BambooHR)
  • 36% of employees would give up $5,000 a year in salary to be happier at work (Randstad) 
  • 35% of employees say their top motivations for changing jobs are the desire for work/life balance and higher compensation; 25% say it's different work culture and wanting more challenging assignments (Right Management
  • 22% of people have changed jobs due to work/life balance issues (Staples)
  • Millennials (29%) report that higher salary is the biggest contributor to their loyalty, compared to 20% of the broader workforce (Staples)
  • 38% of employees cite work responsibilities and 30% cite work/life balance as leading contributors to their loyalty (Staples)
  • Senior executives are 50% more likely than individual contributors to be highly or moderately engaged (Temkin Group
  • 28% of employees have considered leaving their employer and moving to a competitor within the last 12 months (Mercer
  • 35% of employees report they will look for a new job if they do not receive a pay raise in the next 12 months (Glassdoor
  • 42% of Americans say now is a "good time" to find a quality job (Gallup
  • 51% of Americans say now is a good time to find a good job in their local area (Gallup)
  • 39% of job seekers say it's harder to find a job now than the year before (Jobvite
  • 44% of job seekers are optimistic that they'll be able to find a job that suits their skills and qualifications (Jobvite
  • 63% of US workers say they likely would find a new job just as good as their current one if laid off (Gallup)
  • 48% of employees are confident they can find a job that matches their compensation level within six months of starting to hunt (Glassdoor
  • 37% of employees have searched for jobs while at their current job (Jobvite
  • 10% of employees think they’re not being paid what they’re worth so much that they’ll quit their job (BambooHRestimated-cost-of-replacing-an-employee
  • 33% of leaders at organizations with 100+ employees are currently looking for a job at another organization (Modern Survey
  • 44% of employees say they would consider taking a job with a different company for a raise of 20% or less (Gallup
  • Just 37% of engaged employees would consider leaving for a 20% raise or less, compared to 54% of actively disengaged employees (Gallup
  • 55% of managers and employees are either actively looking for a different job than the one they have now or watching for job opportunities (Gallup
  • 34% of leaders are either actively looking for a different job than the one they have now or watching for job opportunities (Gallup
  • 51% of employees are considering a new job (Gallup
  • 34% of all employees are currently looking for work at another organization (Modern Survey
  • 47% of employees are likely to look for a new job in the next year; 31% are extremely or very likely (Aflac
  • 42% of Millennials are looking for jobs with other companies, along with 38% of Gen X and 22% of Boomers (Modern Survey
  • 60% of Millennials are open to a different job opportunity (15 percentage points higher than the percentage of non-millennials) (Gallup)
  • 36% of report that they will look for a job with a different organization in the next 12 months if the job market improves, compared with 21% of non-millennials (Gallup)
  • 22% of employees who are not getting promoted look to other companies for opportunities to advance their careers (BambooHR
  • 27% of US workers plan to seek new employment in the next year (American Psychological Association
  • 49% of Americans plan to spend six years or more at their current company (Finn Futures
  • 56% of executives say promoting loyalty is "not a major focus, but valued nevertheless" (American Management Association
  • 24% of executives say promoting employee loyalty was "never valued nor a major focus" (American Management Association
  • 26% of HR professionals say employees at their organizations have a strong understanding of the concept of employee engagement (Modern Survey
  • Employee engagement programs can increase profits by $2400 per employee per year (Workplace Research Foundation
  • 83% of employees said they planned to look for a new job last year (Salary.com
  • 50% of employed job seekers see a current position as a placeholder, 28% view a current position as a stepping-stone, and another 22% view it as entry-level (Jobvite
  • Organizations that have over 50% employee engagement retain over 80% of their customers (Demand Metric
  • Employees who say their organizational values are “known and understood” are 51 times more likely to be fully engaged than an employee who responds that their organization does not have values that are known and understood (Modern Survey
  • 78% said they would remain longer with their employer if they saw a career path with the current organization (Mercer
  • 41% of employees said they would need to leave their current employer in order to advance their careers (Towers Watson)
  • 55% of American employees (76% of Millennials), expect to change careers – not just jobs – at some point (Cornerstone)
  • 42% of employees say they expect to have three or more careers in their lifetimes (Cornerstone)
  • 67% of America's workforce who plan to change careers expect to do so within the next four years (Cornerstone)
  • 15% say it is very or somewhat likely that they will be laid off in the next 12 months (Gallup)
  • 89% of employees would consider a lateral move within their company, but only 27% of them would consider a lateral move to work for a different company (Cornerstone)
  • 66% of employees will first look to see if there is an interesting and open position at their current company before looking elsewhere (Cornerstone)
  • 38% of Gen X employees intend to stay at their current organization for 11+ years, compared to 23% for Millennials, 21% of Baby Boomers (Modern Survey
  • 41% of employed workers over the age of 50 have spent two decades with the same company, including 18% who've stayed at least 30 years (Associated Press)
  • 25% of Millennials intend to stay at their organization for a year or less, compared to 13% of Boomers and Gen X (Modern Survey
  • More than 60% of Millennials said that they plan to stay in their jobs for some time. However, over 25% admitted that they often thought about quitting their jobs (Boston College
  • Top reasons why Millennials consider leaving their jobs: to make more money, to move forward in their careers, to pursue work that is more aligned with their passions, and to have more flexibility/better work-life balance (Boston College
  • 82% of employees say they would be more loyal to their employers if they had flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • Only 26% of Millennials feel like job hopping is the best way to advance their careers (Boston College
  • Replacing a lost employee costs 150% of that person’s annual salary (Columbia University) (2009 statistic) 
  • Declining employee loyalty is thought to harm organizations by causing low morale (84%), high turnover (80%), disengagement (80%), growing distrust (76%), and lack of team spirit (73%)  (American Management Association
  • Replacing an experienced worker can cost 50% or more of the individual's annual salary in turnover-related costs (AARP
  • Businesses spend about one-fifth of an employee’s annual salary to replace that worker (Center for American Progress
  • Total cost of replacing an employee estimated to be between 90% to 200% of his/her annual salary (SHRM
  • 50% of organizations report difficulty recruiting for full-time, regular positions over the past 12 months (SHRM
  • 30% of companies lost 15% or more of their millennial employees in the past year (Millennial Branding/Beyond.com
  • 32% of employers said they have come to expect workers to job-hop (CareerBuilder
  • 52% of companies report their employees are less loyal than five years ago (American Management Association
  • 34% of companies focus on developing and retaining current employees (American Management Association
  • 47% of Gen X would leave their current job for another offering more money and a more innovative environment (compared to only 42% of Millennials) (IBM
  • 57% of Millennials believe corporate loyalty is dead (Elance/Odesk
  • Millennials are roughly two times more likely to leave a job after two years, 1.5 times more likely after five years and half as likely to stay after 10 years, compared to Generation X and Baby Boomer respondents (Nielsen
  • 43% of Millennials intend to switch jobs in 2015 (Aon Hewitt
  • 82% of Millennials say they are loyal to their employers (but only 1% of HR professionals describe Millennials as loyal to their employers) (Beyond.com
  • 83% of Millennials say they would prefer to work for one company for a long time (EdAssist
  • 51% of Millennials imagine they will stay at their current job for four years or longer, if not until they retire (EdAssist
  • 53% of CFOs say millennials are less loyal to the company (Duke/CFO
  • 25% of Millennials say their top career goal is to "Make a positive impact on my organization" (compared to 21% of GenX and 23% of Baby Boomers) (IBM
  • 52% of millennials say opportunities for career progression is the most desirable quality in a workplace, competitive wages and financial incentives (44%), good training and development programs (35%) (PWC
  • 35% of employers trained low-skill workers and hired them for high-skill jobs in 2015, 33% plan to do the same this year (CareerBuilder
  • 85% of new professionals/soon to be college graduates said employee treatment and welfare were what they look for in future employers (Nielsen
  • 91% of Millennials don’t intend to stick with their job for more than three years (Future Workplace
  • Half of all working Millennials believe “switching jobs helps you climb the corporate ladder faster" (MTV
  • Only one in four Millennials have had more than four jobs in the last 10 years (Clark University
  • Millennials plan to work for five different companies in their lifetimes (Millennial Branding/Randstad
  • Millennials are no more likely than non-millennials to leave their jobs in the next six months (Oxford Economics
  • 52% of Millennials think employee loyalty is overrated (Elance/Odesk
  • 58% of Millennials plan to leave their jobs in three years or less (Elance/Odesk
  • 53% of hiring managers say it's difficult to find & retain Millennial employees (Elance/Odesk
  • 56% of employers reported difficulty retaining high-potential employees and top performers (54%) (Towers Watson
  • 32% of companies struggle to retain top talent (CareerBuilder
  • 45% of HR professionals say it is easy/extremely easy to retain older workers (SHRM
  • Among HR professionals who claim difficulty in retaining older workers, 47% cite work location inflexibility as the biggest challenge, 45% cite career inflexibility, 44% cite work hours inflexibility (SHRM
  • 4% of organizations have a strategy for retaining older workers (SHRM
  • 87% of companies said it cost $15,000 to $25,000 to replace a departed millennial employee (Millennial Branding/Beyond.com
  • 24% of Americans feel more secure in their jobs than they did one year ago versus 17% who feel less secure (BankRate
  • 21% of full-time employees want to change jobs in 2014, the largest percentage since 2008 and up from 17% in 2013 (CareerBuilder
  • 59% of workers are satisfied with their jobs, down from 66% in 2013; 18% are dissatisfied, up from 15% (CareerBuilder
  • 50% of US adults have left their job to get away from their manager (Gallup
  • 93% of US adults say they left their employer in order to change roles (Gallup
  • 65% of employees left jobs in 2015 because they wanted more money (Payscale
  • 70% of people are satisfied with their jobs (American Psychological Association
  • Employees who work for "dream companies" are 11x more likely to stay at their company than those in dream jobs, have 41% more satisfaction, and are 3.5x more likely to say that their job inspires them (Bright Horizons
  • In companies where both leaders and managers are perceived by employees as effective, 72% of employees are highly engaged (Towers Watson
  • 80% of those dissatisfied with their managers are also disengaged from their employers (Dale Carnegie
  • Managers account for at least 70% of variance in employee engagement scores (Gallup
  • 70% of employees who lack confidence in senior leadership are not engaged with their employer (Dale Carnegie
  • Just 35% of U.S. managers are engaged, while 51% are not engaged (Gallup
  • 42% of managers are currently looking for jobs with other organizations (Modern Survey
  • Disengaged managers cost the U.S. $77 billion to $96 billion annually (Gallup
  • 54% of employees who feel they can approach their manager with any type of question are highly engaged (Gallup
  • 62% of millennials who feel they can talk with their manager about non-work-related issues plan to be with their current organization one year from now (Gallup)
  • 65% of employees who don't feel they can approach their manager with any type of question are actively disengaged (Gallup
  • Among employees who strongly agree with the statement, "My manager helps me set work priorities," 38% are engaged. Among employees who disagree, only 4% are engaged (Gallup
  • Among employees who strongly agree with the statement, "My manager holds me accountable for my performance," 28% are engaged. Among employees who disagree, only 6% are engaged (Gallup
  • Among employees who strongly agree that their manager helps them set performance goals, 69% are engaged (Gallup
  • 67% of employees who strongly agree that their manager focuses on their strengths or positive characteristics are engaged (Gallup
  • People who use their strengths every day are six times more likely to be engaged at work, 8% more productive and 15% less likely to quit their jobs (Gallup
  • 40% of union employees trust their senior management, 48% of non-union employees (Modern Survey
  • Career satisfaction and work-life balance are the top reasons American employees stay at their current jobs (38% combined) (Cornerstone)
  • Organizations in which employees are primarily motivated by shared values and a commitment to a mission and purpose are nine times more likely to have high customer satisfaction (LRN
  • 71% of millennials who strongly agree that they know what their organization stands for and what makes it different from its competitors say they plan to be with their company for at least one year (Gallup)
  • 77% of employees in companies that have significantly better financial performance than their peers are highly or moderately engaged, compared with only 49% of employees in companies with lagging financial performance (Temkin Group
  • Companies that outpace their competitors in CX have 50% more engaged employees than those with CX that lags their peers (Temkin Group
  • By the age of 35, 25% of workers have held five jobs or more. For workers ages 55 and older, 20% have held ten jobs or more (CareerBuilder
  • 42% said their employer does a good job of retaining talented employees (Towers Watson
  • Only 20% are able to focus on one task at a time at work, but those who can are 50% more engaged (The Energy Project
  • 54% of employees who are proud of their employer's contributions to society are engaged (Dale Carnegie
  • 61% of employees say it is important for them to work at an organization that is socially responsible” (Modern Survey
  • 63% of workers prioritize sustainability when considering employment (Staples)
  • 86% of new professionals/soon to be college graduates say it’s important that the company they work for behaves in a socially responsible way (Nielsen
  • 83% of executives say they will be increasing the use of contingent, intermittent or consultant employees (Oxford Economics
  • 25% of IT employees plan to change jobs this year, up from 15% last year (CareerBuilder
  • When asked the question, "Is job hopping losing its stigma?" 57% of Milennials say yes, compared to 38% of GenX, and 22% of Boomers (Accountemps
  • 25% of Millennials believe that staying at a job for seven months indicates they're loyal; Boomers believe that number is five years (Ultimate Software
  • 33% of employees knew whether they would stay at their company long-term after being on the job for one week or less; 63% knew within the first month (Ultimate Software
  • When companies select the top 20% most talented candidates for a role, they frequently realize a 10% increase in productivity, 20% increase in sales, 30% increase in profitability, 10% decrease in turnover and a 25% decrease in unscheduled absences (Gallup
  • Employees who get the opportunity to continually develop are twice as likely to say they will spend their career with their company (Gallup
  • 53% of Millennials say learning new things or having access to professional development opportunities would make them stay at their job (EdAssist
  • 29% of American employees resign due to work overload and lack of healthy work-life balance (Cornerstone)
  • 53% of Millennials say a healthy work-life balance would make them stay at their job (EdAssist
  • Only about 20% of Millennials want to advance if it means spending less time with their families / personal lives (Boston College)
  • Employees whose managers hold regular meetings with them are almost three times as likely to be engaged (Gallup
  • IT pros say they receive 32 job solicitations per week (CareerBuilder
  • 80% of IT pros are open to hearing about a new job (TEKsystems
  • 65% of IT pros stay in their jobs due to happiness at work, 19% cite convenience and 13% money (AlienVault
  • Eight in 10 U.S. adults who are open to a new job or who are actively seeking a job say that they are at least somewhat more likely to apply at an organization that has recently won a great workplace award (Gallup
  • 62% believe their job prospects will be good/excellent in the next 12 months (Nielsen
  • Happiest workforces: Starbucks, Ace Hardware, Ikea, Apple and Barnes & Noble (CareerBliss
  • 98% of HR pros are open to hiring former employees (Accountemps)
  • 76% of employers are now more accepting of hiring “boomerang” employees – or employees who have previously worked for the employer (Workplace Trends
  • 85% of employers said they received an application from a boomerang employee in the past five years (Workplace Trends
  • 29% American workers say they have “boomeranged” at least once in their career, and 41% say they would consider going back to a former workplace (Spherion)
  • 52%) of employees said their company currently employs at least one boomerang worker (Spherion)
  • 37% of employees believe their company favors hiring boomerang employees to save money on recruitment and training, while also minimizing risk (Spherion)
  • 33% of employees say the ability to collaborate makes them more loyal (The Economist)
  • Employers rated by employees as “pioneers” in supporting mobile technology saw better productivity (16%), creativity (18%), satisfaction (23%) and loyalty (21%) (The Economist)
  • 27% of companies conduct "stay interviews" to reduce turnover, 24% plan to implement them (Challenger, Gray & Christmas)
  • 82% of employees say a pet-friendly workplace increases loyalty (Banfield

Workplace Satisfaction Statistics

  • 88% of U.S. employees reported overall satisfaction with their current job in 2015, marking the highest level of satisfaction over the last decade (SHRM)
  • Job satisfaction contributors employee cited as very important: Respectful treatment of all employees at all levels (67%), Compensation (63%), Benefits (60%), Job security (58%), Trust between employees and senior management (55%) (SHRM)
  • Millennials' top job satisfaction contributors: Respectful treatment (66%), compensation (65%), benefits (61%), job security (58%) (SHRM)
  • In a ranking of 35 countries, Colombia ranks highest for job happiness globally while Japan ranks last (Indeed
  • Cities with the happiest workers: Los Angeles, Miami, San Diego (Indeed
  • Cities with the lowest level of job satisfaction: Denver, Indianapolis, Louisville (Indeed
  • Highest-ranking factors in job satisfaction worldwide: Work-life balance, Management, Culture (Indeed
  • 68% of U.S. full-time employees are suffering from work overload (Cornerstone
  • 40% of Millennials have high job satisfaction (Deloitte
  • 45% of employees say their top definition of workplace success is enjoyment/happiness (Right Management
  • 63% of employees believe their organization is headed in the right direction (Modern Survey
  • 33% of American employees are satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs (Oxford Economics
  • 67% of employees say they love or have no major complaints about their company (Virgin Pulse
  • 51% of U.S. workers say they "often recommend their organization as a great place to work." (Modern Survey
  • 72% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with their relations with their coworkers (Gallup
  • 70% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the physical safety conditions of their workplace (Gallup
  • 33% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the amount of money they earn (Gallup
  • 57% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with their job security (Gallup)
  • 54% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with their boss or immediate supervisor (Gallup)
  • 53% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the amount of work that is required of them (Gallup)
  • 45% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the recognition they receive at work for their accomplishments (Gallup)
  • Percentage of generations who would "often recommend their organization as a great place to work": 59% of Millennials, 51% GenX, 47% Boomers (Modern Survey)
  • 70% of U.S. employees are proud to work for their organization (Modern Survey)
  • 29% of employees feel valued in their jobs (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • Only 10% of employees define career success as high performance and productivity (Right Management)
  • More than 80% of Millennials say they're willing to put in a great deal of effort beyond that normally expected in order to help their organization be successful (Boston College)
  • 85% of Millennials agree that they're treated with respect at work (Boston College)
  • 54% of workers say they like the people they work with (CareerBuilder)
  • Employees who say they have more supportive supervisors are 1.3 times as likely to stay with the organization and are 67% more engaged (The Energy Project)
  • In 2010, only 34% of employees said they would recommend working at their company (Bain & Co)
  • 77% of employees desire relocating to a different city, state or country as a career move (Cornerstone)
  • 15% of employees say their employer offers relocation opportunities (Cornerstone)
  • According to employees, salary is more important to job satisfaction (88%) than having a certain title (55%) (CareerBuilder)
  • 65% of full-time U.S. workers say they do not currently earn their desired salary (CareerBuilder)
  • Dissatisfied employees cite concerns over salary (66%) and not feeling valued (65%) most often as reasons for their dissatisfaction (CareerBuilder)
  • 40% of employees wish their employer cared more about their financial well-being (Virgin Pulse)
  • 44% of employees believe that their employer cares about their wellbeing (PwC)
  • 86% of recruiters report having recently spoken with underemployed/under-compensated employees (MRI Network)
  • 60% of employees feel their relationship with their employer positively impacts their focus or productivity at work (Virgin Pulse)
  • 51% of employees are extremely concerned about job security (MetLife)
  • 52% of employees believe they have a promising future at their organization (Modern Survey)
  • 78% of employees feel they are making a difference and appreciated when managers focus on their strengths over their weaknesses (The VIA Institute on Character)
  • 64% of employees believe they will be more successful at work by building on their strengths than fixing their weaknesses (The VIA Institute on Character)
  • 65% of employees who report having had a meaningful discussion with their manager about their strengths describe themselves as flourishing at work (The VIA Institute on Character)
  • 25% of workers described their workplace as “happy,” “fast-paced” (29%) and “stressful” (28%) (Spherion
  • 44% say their relationship with their employer positively impacts stress levels (Virgin Pulse)
  • 86% of employees say a pet-friendly workplace helps decrease stress levels (Banfield)
  • 56% of actively disengaged workers report they experienced a lot of stress yesterday, compared with 32% of engaged workers (Gallup)
  • 28% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the amount of stress they have at work (Gallup
  • The top sources of work stress are low salaries (according to 51%) and lack of opportunity for growth and advancement (44%) (American Psychological Association)
  • 80% of employees report being stressed out by work (Nielsen)
  • Biggest workplace stresses: low pay (13%), commute (13%), work load (12%), coworkers (10%) (Nielsen)
  • 56% of employees who don't feel valued report being stressed during the day, compared to 25% of those who do feel valued (American Psychological Association)
  • 23%, of employees feel “high” or “overwhelming” financial stress (Financial Finesse)
  • 63% of senior marketers say their job is somewhat stressful, 27% say it is somewhat stressful, 7% say it is very stressful, 3% say it isn't stressful at all (The Creative Group)
  • 32% of senior marketers say the the more stressful the situation, the more productive they are; 60% say a little bit of stress motivates them but too much impedes their productivity; 8% say they are less productive with any level of stress (The Creative Group)
  • 53% of employees said “interesting and challenging” work is the top reason they love their company (Virgin Pulse)
  • "Becoming obsolete" is the biggest concern for today's worker, twice as concerning as being laid off (Oxford Economics)
  • 39% of employees are concerned about their position being automated or made obsolete in the next five years (Jobvite)
  • 13% of employees said they were fearful of losing their job in the next six months (Glassdoor)
  • The more hours people work beyond 40 the worse they feel, and the less engaged they become (The Energy Project)
  • Nearly 40% of employees said they wished their employer cared more about their work/life balance (Virgin Pulse)
  • 41% of employees believe work-life balance is impossible to achieve (Randstad)
  • 14% will leave if they don’t have a healthy work-life balance (BambooHR)
  • 80% of employees say they’re motivated to do their jobs through coercion (LRN)
  • 24% of employees don’t trust their employer (American Psychological Association)
  • 50% of employees trust senior management (Modern Survey)
  • 32% of employees feel that their organization isn’t always honest and truthful (American Psychological Association)
  • 64% of employed adults feel their organization treats them fairly (American Psychological Association)
  • 26% said their employer does not make it easy to understand opportunities for advancement within the organization (Mercer)
  • 50% of job seekers say that their most recent employer has helped them advance in their career (Future Workplace)
  • 51% of employees report they receive “no input” or “input only once in a while” from superiors on how to perform better in their roles (Mercer)
  • 15% of organizations with 100+ employees measure the engagement of their employees more than once a year (Modern Survey)
  • 46% of organizations with 100+ employees survey annually and 16% never measure engagement (Modern Survey)
  • 98% of CEOs ignore annual employee engagement survey results (Motivosity)
  • 15% of employees say they are currently working in their dream job, 36% say that while they’re not quite there yet, they believe they will be someday (CareerBuilder)
  • 72% of the U.S. workforce feels a sense of personal accomplishment at work (Modern Survey)
  • Attributes employees think are most important to their employer: job performance and results (46%); the ability to learn and be trained quickly (29%); and loyalty and long-term commitment to the company (28%) (Oxford Economics)
  • Millennials' top attributes of the perfect boss:  Ethical and fair 35%, Transparent and readily shares information 35%, Dependable and consistent 32% (IBM)
  • GenX's top attributes of the perfect boss: Transparent and readily shares information 42%, Clearly defines goals and expectations 42%, Ethical and fair 37% Dependable and consistent (IBM)
  • Top reasons why job seekers will leave for another job: more compensation (61%), location (42%), better work-life balance (40%), health benefits (36%), growth opportunities (35%), company culture (21%) and leadership (15%) (Jobvite)
  • Boomers' top attributes of the perfect boss: Dependable and consistent 35%, Ethical and fair 35%, Dependable and consistent 35% (IBM)
  • Employees who derive meaning and significance from their work are more than three times as likely to stay with their organizations, reported 1.7 times higher job satisfaction and are 1.4 times more engaged (The Energy Project)
  • 38% of employees said “the company’s mission” is a top reason they love their company (Virgin Pulse)
  • Nearly 40% of employees indicated their co-workers as the top reason they love their company (Virgin Pulse)
  • 58% of working Americans claim that their coworkers are more productive at work when they're happy (Ultimate Software)
  • 67% of employees say a pet-friendly workplace increases productivity (Banfield)
  • Millennials top three work-related fears: getting stuck with no development opportunities, not being able to realize their career goals, and not finding a job that matches their personality (Universum)
  • 87% of millennials say professional development or career growth opportunities are very important (Gallup)
  • Among Millennials, friendships in the workplace make them feel happy (57%), motivated (50%), and productive (39%) (LinkedIn)
  • 78% of Millennials say it is more important to enjoy work than to make a lot of money (Clark University)
  • Half of Millennials would “rather have no job than a job they hate” (MTV)
  • 84% of millennials say that helping to make a positive difference in the world is more important than professional recognition (Bentley University)
  • 49% of millennials are satisfied with the growth and development opportunities and 47% are satisfied with their company's employee recognition practices (American Psychological Association)
  • 82% of employees don’t think they’re recognized for their work as often as they deserve (BambooHR)
  • 81% of companies have formal recognition programs (SHRM)
  • 86% of values-based recognition programs show an increase in worker happiness (SHRM)
  • 38% of millennials would like to see the recognition program at their current employer improved (Aon Hewitt)
  • 74% of companies have a service anniversary program (SHRM)
  • 45% of Millennials would quit a job if they didn't see a career path they wanted at the company (Ultimate Software)
  • 58% of Millennials expect employers to provide them with learning opportunities relevant to their job (EdAssist)
  • 58% of employees (62% of Millennials and GenX) say that professional development contributes to their job satisfaction (CompTIA)
  • 12% of employees feel their employers aid them in their career development (Bridge)
  • 59% of Millennials would prefer a job with a strong potential for professional development (EdAssist)
  • 40% of Millennials say that becoming a manager/leader is “very important” (Universum)
  • 41% of Millennials would prefer a job with a potential for regular pay raises (EdAssist)
  • 30% of millennials leave due to better offers elsewhere, almost the same amount leave because their career goals aren't in line with their employer (Millennial Branding/Beyond.com)
  • 26% of Millennials feel their employers are actually invested in their professional development (EdAssist)
  • 46% of professionals worldwide believe that work friends are important to their overall happiness (LinkedIn)
  • 70% of employees say their employer should understand them to the same degree they are expected to understand customers (Towers Watson)
  • 53% of employees say performance reviews don't motivate them to work harder (Globoforce)
  • 50% of employees strongly agree they know what's expected of them at work (Gallup)
  • 76% of employees don’t trust bosses who fail to share company data (GeckoBoard)
  • 50% of employees say bosses sharing information and data has a significantly positive impact on productivity and motivation (HubSpot)
  • 78% of Millennials say workplace environment affects their decisions to stay at a job (RingCentral)
  • 81% of employers said the workplace environment is important to attracting top talent, 67% have undertaken changes to their office spaces to make them more competitive and attractive to talent (Work Design
  • 82% of Millennials said it was important to them to have a career that does some good in the world (Clark University)
  • 63% of Millennials like their employers to contribute to social or ethical causes (Brookings)
  • Baby Boomers are 67% more interested in making more money than doing good (Atenga)
  • 64% of Millennials said they would rather make $40,000 a year at a job they love than $100,000 a year at a job they think is boring (Intelligence Group)
  • 62% of executives say Millennials will consider leaving their jobs due to lack of learning and development, just 31% of Millennials say they have considered this (Oxford Economics)
  • 8 out of 10 Millennials think they deserve to be recognized more for their work (MTV)
  • 65% of IT employees are satisfied with their jobs, down from 72% in 2013 (CareerBuilder)
  • 19% of IT employees are dissatisfied with their jobs, up from 12% last year (CareerBuilder)
  • 27% of IT employees have been recruited by other organizations in the past year (CareerBuilder)
  • 69% of IT employees see job stability as more important than salary, 64% say job location, 60% say good work culture (CareerBuilder)
  • 73% of tech employees believed their company became a better overall company within the past six months (TINYpulse)
  • 36% of IT professionals are happy or very happy at work, 32% unhappy and 31% neutral (AlienVault)
  • Employees who see performance reviews as inaccurate are 2x more likely to look for another job (Globoforce)
  • 48% of employees feel they have the opportunity to use their creativity at work (Modern Survey)
  • 62% of U.S. employees say they can be successful at their organizations while balancing work and their personal lives  (Modern Survey)
  • 28% of employees say personal finances have been a distraction at work (PwC)

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Employee Benefits Statistics

  • The United States is projected to have an average of 2.7% actual wage growth (accounting for inflation) in 2016, the largest increase in three years (KFHG)
  • 42% of employees say improving their benefits package is one thing their employers could do to keep them in their jobs; the second most mentioned after “increase my salary” (Aflac)
  • 19% of employers say their employees have a high level of understanding their benefits (IFEBP)
  • 80% of organizations report low benefits knowledge due to participants not opening/reading materials, almost half don't understand the materials, and 31% say participants do not perceive value in their benefits (IFEBP)
  • 62% of all employees look to their employers for help in achieving financial security through employee benefits (MetLife)
  • 16% of employees have left a job or turned down a job in the last 12 months due to the benefits offered (Aflac)
  • 96% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are satisfied with their jobs (Aflac)
  • 36% of employees say improving their benefits package is one thing their employer could do to keep them in their jobs (Aflac)
  • 15% of employees have left or turned down a job due to the benefits it offered in the last 12 months (Aflac)
  • 46% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to look for new jobs in the next 12 months (compared to 57% of those who are unsatisfied) (Aflac)
  • 60% of employees are likely to take a job with lower pay but better benefits (Aflac)
  • 43% of employees have medical coverage through their job and only 33% have a 401(k) plan through their company (Jobvite)
  • Medical insurers project the healthcare benefits costs to rise by 9.1% in 2016, an increase from 8.0% in 2015 and 7.5% in 2014 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 57% of organizations offer health benefits to at least some of their employees (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 87% of midsize employers offer PPO health coverage (BenefitFocus)
  • 34% of employees at midsize companies go with a HDHP option (BenefitFocus)
  • Among employers with 50+ full-time employees, 4% reported switching full-time employees to part time status (4%), changing part-time workers to full-time workers (10%), reducing the number of full-time employees they intended to hire (5%) or increasing waiting periods (2%) in response to the employer shared responsibility provision which took effect for some firms in 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 31% of large firms offering health benefits provide an incentive to complete a health risk assessment (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 64% of millennials say benefits are extremely or very important to employer loyalty (Aflac)
  • 59% of organizations have offered the same amount of benefits over the past year; 35% have increased their benefits, 7% decreased (SHRM)
  • 77% of organizations saw increases in their costs after ACA (SHRM)
  • 24% of employers only offer high-deductible health plans, doubling the percentage from 2012 (PwC)
  • 24% of workers were enrolled in high-deductible health plans in 2015, up from 20% in 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 87% of midsize employers offer PPO health coverage (BenefitFocus)
  • 34% of employees at midsize companies go with a HDHP option (BenefitFocus)
  • 40% of Millennials over age 26 opt in to HDHPs (BenefitFocus)
  • PPO plans remain the most common plan type, enrolling 52% of covered workers in 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • Wages increased 1.9% and inflation declined by 0.2% from 2014 to 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • For single coverage, 61% of covered workers are in plans that require them to make a contribution of less than or equal to a quarter of the total premium, 2% are in plans that require more than half of the premium, and 16% are in plans that require no contribution at all (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • For family coverage, 44% of covered workers are in plans that require them to make a contribution of less than or equal to a quarter of the total premium and 15% are in plans that require more than half of the premium, while only 6% are in plans that require no contribution at all (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 81% of covered workers have a general annual deductible for single coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 68% of covered workers have a copay for office visits with a primary care or specialist physician, in addition to any general annual deductible (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 99% of covered workers are in a plan that covers some prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 12% of covered workers enrolled in a plan with prescription drug coverage are enrolled in a plan with a separate annual drug deductible that applies only to prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • Opioid abusers cost employers nearly twice as much ($19,450) in medical expenses on average annually as non-abusers ($10,853) (Castlight)
  • 98% of covered workers are in plans with an out-of-pocket maximum for single coverage, significantly more than the 88% in 2013 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 47% of employers with 3 to 9 workers offer health insurance coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 23% of large firms that offer health benefits in 2015 also offer retiree health benefits (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 17% of small firms and 74% of large firms offer the option of contributing to a flexible spending account (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • In 2015, 13% of large employers and 42% of small employers automatically enroll eligible employees (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 63% of covered workers are enrolled in a plan that is either partially or completely self-funded (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 5% of large employers reported that they intend to reduce the number of full-time employees that they intend to hire because of the cost of providing health care benefits (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • Employees who are very satisfied w/ benefits are almost 4x more likely to be very satisfied with their jobs (MetLife)
  • 31.6% of total employee compensation costs were accounted for by benefits (SHRM)
  • In 2015, the average annual premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance were $6,251 for single coverage and $17,545 for family coverage, up 4% over 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 65% of employees have $1,000 or less to pay unexpected out-of-pocket medical expenses (Aflac)
  • 59% say they wouldn’t be able to adjust to the large financial costs associated with a serious injury or illness (Aflac)
  • 44% of employees say they would have to borrow from their 401(k)s or use credit cards to cover unexpected out-of-pocket expenses (Aflac)
  • 55% of employees in lower-income households (less than $50,000 in household income per year) are not prepared to pay for costs associated with an unanticipated serious illness or accident not covered by major medical insurance (Aflac)
  • 60% of employees said the top issues concerning them are increasing out-of-pocket medical expenses or the increasing cost of major medical or health insurance over maintaining their health benefits or the possibility of their employer eliminating spouse coverage (Aflac)
  • 25% of employees have had difficulty paying a medical bill due to high medical costs (Aflac)
  • 38% of consumers with employee-provided insurance coverage asked about an alternative treatment because of costs (PWC)
  • 81% believe the medical costs they are responsible for will increase (Aflac)
  • Just 16% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to put off a medical procedure longer than they should (Aflac)
  • 79% of employees see a growing need for voluntary insurance today compared to last year (Aflac)
  • 19% of employers say taking care of my employees by offering the widest range of benefits options is the most important objective of their benefits programs (Aflac)
  • 65% of organizations say educating employees about their benefits is a high priority (IFEBP)
  • Nearly two in five organizations have budgets specifically devoted to benefits communication and 25% are planning to increase those budgets in 2016 (IFEBP)
  • 26% of employers are interested in outsourcing employee benefits communications services to a third party (Aflac)
  • Platforms employers are using to communicate about benefits: (IFEBP)
    • Educational materials printed and mailed to homes—89%
    • Email—73%
    • Printed and distributed on site—69%
    • Internal websites—66%
    • External websites—58%
  • 36% of employers understand health care reform legislation extremely or very well (Aflac)
  • 34% of employees have children under 18 covered on their health plans (Aflac)
  • 51% of employees are extremely or very satisfied with their benefits packages (Aflac)
  • 77% of organizations review their benefits programs annually, and 11% review them even more frequently (SHRM)
  • 15% of organizations offered specific retention bonuses to executive-level employees, and 15% offered them to nonexecutive employees (SHRM)
  • 74% of employees want better benefits (BambooHR)
  • 62% of employees would leave a job for better benefits (Care.com)
  • 79% of employees would prefer new or additional benefits to a pay increase (Glassdoor)
  • Employees aged 18-34 (89%) and 35-44 (84%) prefer benefits or perks to pay raises, compared to those aged 45-54 (70%) and 55-64 (66%) (Glassdoor)
  • 50% of employees cite benefits as an important reason they remain with their current employer (MetLife)
  • 70% say that benefits that can be customized to meet their needs would increase their loyalty to their employers (MetLife)
  • At companies where employees are offered no benefits, only 46% of employees would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • At companies offering 1-5 benefits, 53% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife
  • At companies offering 11 or more benefits, 66% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • 87% of employers say retention is a very important benefits objective (MetLife)
  • 41% of employers ranked retention as their top employee benefits objective  (MetLife)
  • 40% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the health insurance benefits their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 61% of employees are worried about having enough money to meet out-of-pocket medical costs that are not covered by health insurance (MetLife)
  • 50% of employees strongly agree that because of the benefits they receive at work, they worry less about unexpected health and financial issues (MetLife)
  • 44% of Millennials are relying on their employers to ensure their financial security (MetLife)
  • 23% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to have been distracted at work by a personal issue (compared to 33% of those who are unsatisfied) (Aflac)
  • 50% of employers say that cost-sharing with employees is an important benefits strategy (MetLife)
  • 35% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the retirement plan offered (Gallup)
  • 35% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with their chances for a promotion (Gallup)
  • 58% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the flexibility of their hours (Gallup)
  • 57% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the amount of vacation time they receive (Gallup)
  • 48% of organizations offer community volunteer programs (SHRM
  • 76% of employees reported a salary increase or promotion after completing an online certification (Simplilearn)
  • Benefits that employees say would increase engagement and loyalty: compensation (40%), better benefits (36%), career advancement opportunities (34%), training/education (31%), coworkers they like (18%), corporate culture (18%) (Workforce 2020)
  • 88% of executives and 85% of benefit managers agree that benefit programs have the most impact on improving employee loyalty as well as increasing employee engagement and lowering company medical costs (Wells Fargo)
  • Nearly 40% of employees say having a wide selection of benefits would make them feel more loyal to their employer (MetLife)
  • Most important factors in Millennial workplace selection: career advancement, salary, benefits, work-life balance and job security (Boston College)
  • Benefits students look for from employers: More than two weeks of vacation, Tuition reimbursement for advanced education, Promised annual salary increase, Company match for 401(k), Casual dress policy (NACE)
  • 56% of organizations offer undergraduate educational assistance (SHRM)
  • 74% of employers claim cost is an important consideration in making benefits decisions (MetLife)
  • 26% of job offers are rejected due to benefits/salary not meeting expectations (MRI Network)
  • 43% of young women expect to make less than $35,000 in their first job, compared to 34% of men (Adecco Staffing)
  • Employees who spend less than 20% of their time working remotely are the most satisfied (Gallup)
  • 41% of working parents say the lack of family assistance-related benefits has hurt their work performance (Care.com)
  • 30% are "very satisfied" with their work-life benefits, and about 1 in 10 employees aren't satisfied at all (Care.com)
  • 89% of working parents want family care benefits; 81% say their employers don't offer any (Care.com)
  • 60% say their companies don't appear to care about their child care needs (Care.com)
  • Among mothers who are currently employed either full or part time, 40% say they would prefer to work outside the home, and 54% would prefer to stay home (Gallup)
  • 22% of organizations allow employees to bring their children to work in a child care emergency (SHRM)
  • 71% of senior staff agrees that telecommuting allows them to get more work done, compared to 51% of middle or staff level employees (CompTIA)
  • 58% of Americans believe remote workers are just as productive as those who work in a business office (Gallup)
  • 37% of U.S. workers say they have telecommuted (Gallup)
  • 60% of organizations offer some form of telecommuting (SHRM
  • 75% of Millennials would prefer to work from home or other locations where they feel they could be most productive. However, only 43% currently are allowed to do this (Deloitte
  • 44% of employees indicated flexible work arrangements as the No. 1 benefit they’d love to have at work (Virgin Pulse
  • 30% of employees said they would take a 10% or 20% cut in pay in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 24% of employees are willing to forfeit vacation time in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 18% of employees would give up employer-matched retirement contributions in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 10% of employees want a situation where they do not come into the office at all, and 35% do not want any telecommuting days at all (CompTIA
  • 63% of Millennials say they're more likely to join a company that offers the option to telecommute (along with 57% of GenX, 41% of Boomers) (CompTIA
  • 44% of employees view companies that don't offer a telecommuting option as old-fashioned (CompTIA
  • 96% of employees reported having some type of flexibility (Flex+Strategy)
  • 97% of employees say a job with flexibility would have a positive impact on their overall quality of life (Flexjobs)
  • Reasons why employees say they want flexible work options: Work-life balance (81 percent), Family (56 percent), Time savings (56 percent), Commute stress (48 percent) (Flexjobs)
  • Policies that would reduce voluntary turnover: Flexible schedules (51%), Increased recognition (awards, cash prizes, company trips) (50%), Acting on employee feedback (48%) (CareerBuilder
  • More than one-third of employees would change companies for an employer that embraces flexible work (Unify
  • 73% of working adults agree that flexibility is one of the most important factors they consider when looking for a new job (Mom Corps
  • 47% of working adults say asking for flexible work options would hurt their chances of job advancement (Mom Corps
  • 39% of working adults have considered leaving or have left a job because it wasn't flexible enough (Mom Corps
  • 81% of Millennials think they should be allowed to make their own hours at work versus 69% of Boomers (MTV
  • Things workers are willing to sacrifice in order to have more happiness at work: a less private office space (76%), reduced workplace flexibility (60%), accept a lower position or title (60%) give up benefits such as their vacation time, accept a reduction on 401(K) contributions from an employer and other job perks (41%), take a pay cut (36%), relinquish health benefits (31%) (Spherion
  • Retirement plans, flexibility and time-off rank well ahead of amenities such as fitness centers, daycare and subsidized food (Oxford Economics
  • Most desired employee perks: Half-day Fridays (40%), On-site gym (20%), casual dress (18%) (CareerBuilder
  • 70% of employees reported that increasing salaries is the best way to boost employee retention, 58% said better benefits (CareerBuilder
  • 82% of government employees say they are "completely" or "somewhat satisfied" with their retirement plan (Gallup
  • 57% of nongovernment employees say they are "completely" or "somewhat satisfied" with their retirement plan (Gallup
  • 80% of government workers are satisfied with the benefits that their employer offers (Gallup
  • 57% of nongovernment workers are satisfied with the benefits that their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 91% of governmental workers say they are satisfied with their vacation time (Gallup
  • 74% of nongovernmental workers say they are satisfied with their vacation time (Gallup
  • The most important benefits and incentives to American employees are: competitive compensation (84%), retirement plans (75%), and vacation time (62%) (Oxford Economics
  • 56% of Americans say they haven't taken a vacation in the last 12 months, compared to 52%, who reported going without a vacation for a year in 2014 (Allianz
  • 15% of Americans said they haven't been on vacation in 7 to 12 months and 10% said it has been 4 to 6 months, with 16% saying they have been on vacation within the last 3 months (Allianz
  • 68% of Millennials say compensation is the most important aspect of their workplace (Oxford Economics
  • 68% ofpeople say that salary and compensation is among their top considerations before accepting a job (Glassdoor)
  • 57% of people say benefits and perks are among their top considerations before accepting a job (Glassdoor)
  • 22% of employees say compensation is the major factor determining happiness in the workplace (Spherion
  • 76% of Hiring Managers believe Millennials are motivated by money (Elance/Odesk
  • 53% of Millennials say their biggest motivator is having the chance to work on exciting and interesting projects (Elance/Odesk
  • 51% of millennials say benefits are where their current employer has the most room for improvement (Aon Hewitt
  • 43% of employees expect a pay raise in the next 12 months (Glassdoor
  • Of those who expect a pay raise, 49% expect it to be between 3-5% (Glassdoor)
  • 28% of employers believe “that most or all of their employees understand the company’s compensation philosophy.” (WorldatWork
  • 82% of employers give out bonuses (WorldatWork
  • 45% of companies offer spot bonuses/awards, or unscheduled bonuses for exceptional performance (SHRM
  • 41% of Millennials say higher compensation would increase their loyalty and engagement with the company (Oxford Economics
  • 39% of employees say higher compensation would increase loyalty and engagement with their current job (Oxford Economics
  • Reasons why retirees return to the workforce, according to HR professionals: money (72%), occupying time (58%), health care benefits (45%), social interaction (42%) (SHRM)
  • 39% of executives say their company offers competitive compensation (Oxford Economics
  • 78% said that the employee benefits package is very or extremely important in their decision to accept or reject a job (EBRI
  • 31% of employees are only somewhat satisfied with the benefits offered by their current employer; 26% are not satisfied (EBRI
  • 50% of employees are satisfied with their benefits (MetLife
  • 85% of employees report at least some level of financial stress (Financial Finesse)
  • 15% of employees have taken a pay cut to work for a sustainable company (Bain & Co)
  • 38% of millennials say money would motivate them to work harder and stay with their employer longer (opportunities for advancement was cited by 30%, meaningful work 15%, good boss 7%, and working for a fast-growing company 6%) (Millennial Branding/Randstad)
  • 54% said career advancement opportunities are more important than salary when looking for work (Achievers
  • 40% of employers are sending employees back to school to get an advanced degree (23% fund it partially, 12% fully funding) (CareerBuilder
  • 68% of employers offer training programs; 71% offer soft skills and 72% offer hard skills (CareerBuilder
  • The most common adaptions to accommodate millennials in the U.S. are making work hours more flexible (21%), allowing work from home (17%), increasing training (16%), implementing new mentoring programs (13%), and altering corporate culture (10%) (Duke/CFO
  • 67% more Millennials than Baby Boomers say that "having a great mentor" at work is important (Atenga
  • 32% of employees say their employer encourages them to work in different departments to gain additional experience and skills (Cornerstone)
  • Salary and "meaningful work" are the most important benefits potential employees look for (Millennial Branding/Beyond.com
  • 78% of employees want a greater variety of benefits to choose from (MetLife)
  • 80% of employees would value benefits customized to individual circumstances and age (MetLife
  • 86% of Millennials state they value having benefits personalized to meet their individual circumstances and age (MetLife
  • 96% of millennials say great health-care benefits are important in choosing a job, more important than frequent raises (94%) and promotions (82%) (Bentley University
  • 77% of millennials say flexible work hours would make the workplace more productive for people their age (Bentley University
  • 83% of Millennials ranked travel rewards as the number one reward that they would want most from an employer (Achievers
  • 65% of employees think a flexible and remote work schedule would increase their productivity (Cornerstone
  • 68% of recent grads said the ability to work remotely at least some of the time would affect their likelihood to accept a position (After College
  • 74% of millennials expect flexible schedules in the workplace (Deep Focus)
  • Only 19% of employees are allowed to work remotely by their employers (Cornerstone)
  • 50% of those under the age of 40 felt that a company’s approach to sustainable business practices have influenced their decision about accepting a job (Bain & Co)
  • Feeling encouraged by a supervisor to take breaks increases by nearly 100% people’s likelihood to stay with any given company, and also doubles their sense of health and well-being (The Energy Project
  • Of the 79% who have no intention to change jobs, 54% cite liking the people they work with, 50% cite good work/life balance, and 49% cite good benefits as reasons for staying (CareerBuilder
  • 43% of millennials would switch jobs for greater flexibility (Unify)
  • 74% of Millennials want flexible work schedules (Intelligence Group)
  • 50% of Millennials say flexible work hours and the freedom to work from any location would improve their work/life balance (RingCentral
  • 59% of North America Millennials define work/life balance as “flexible work hours” (Universum)
  • 42% of North American Millennials are in favor of working long hours if it speeds up career progress (Universum)
  • 48% of millennials have been in their current job five years or longer (Clark University)
  • 33% of Millennials expect their employer to help repay existing student loans (EdAssist)
  • 50% of Millennials expect financial support in paying for further education (EdAssist)
  • 69% of Millennials say the people whom they work with would enable their best work (Millennial Branding/Randstad
  • 26% of workers said that providing special corporate perks is an effective way to improve employee retention (CareerBuilder
  • 17% of organizations offer same-sex domestic partner benefits (excluding health care) (SHRM
  • 26% of organizations offered family leave above required federal FMLA, and 22% provided family leave above any state FMLA requirements (SHRM
  • 21% of organizations offer paid maternity leave (SHRM
  • 99% of companies provide some form of paid vacation leave to their full-time employees (SHRM
  • 86% of organizations provide between 6 and 20 vacation days to full-time employees on average, with 40% providing 11 to 15 days (SHRM
  • 23% of Americans have no paid holidays (CEPR
  • 98% of organizations offer paid holidays (SHRM
  • 73% of organizations offer six to 10 days of paid holidays to their full-time employees per year (SHRM
  • 72% of organizations offered six to 10 days of paid holidays to part-time employees (SHRM
  • 95% of organizations provide some form of paid sick leave to employees (SHRM)
  • 43 million private sector workers have no sick days (National Partnership for Women & Families
  • 39% of employees don’t believe their bosses encourage them to take allotted vacation days (Randstad) 
  • 40% of workers who received paid vacation as a benefit did not use all of their available days in 2014 (Alamo
  • 26% of employees feel like they can’t turn off their job outside of work hours or even while on vacation (Cornerstone
  • 19% of employees left five days or more of paid vacation unused last year (Alamo)
  • 38% of employees believe taking fewer vacations makes them look better in the eyes of their boss (Randstad) 
  • 49% of employees feel stressed after they return from vacation (Randstad)
  • 46% of employees say they worry about work while on vacation (Randstad) 
  • 34% of millennials work every day of their vacations (Alamo
  • 95% of senior business leaders recognize the importance of using time off (US Travel Association
  • 36% of employees have had to cancel vacation plans due to work (Randstad)
  • 67% of employees say their company says nothing, sends mixed messages about or discourages using their PTO (US Travel Association
  • 41% of employees do not plan to use all their paid time off this year (US Travel Association
  • 41% of Americans didn't take a single vacation day in 2015 (Skift
  • 33% of employees say they cannot afford to use their PTO (US Travel Association)
  • 46% of employees respond to emails while taking PTO; 29% return calls from work (US Travel Association
  • 61% of Americans work while they’re on vacation despite repeated complaints from members of their family; one-in-four are contacted by a colleague about a work-related matter while taking time off, while one-in-five have been contacted by their boss (Glassdoor
  • 37% of senior business leaders reported unplugging entirely from work during PTO , compared to 74% of employees (US Travel Association
  • Americans who used all of their paid vacation were more likely to unplug while on their trips (54 percent vs. 37 percent) with 40% stating they are more productive when they return to work (Alamo
  • Employees only use 51% of their eligible paid vacation time and paid time off (Glassdoor
  • 40% of employees feel they can't justify taking time off due to workload, 13% are intimidated by work piling up while they're gone (Oxford Economics
  • One in four U.S adults (24.6%) receive company emails on their mobile device (Samanage)
  • Young Millennials age 18-24 (25.1%) and older Millennials age 25-34 (29.2%) are more than twice as likely to get company emails on their mobile device compared to Baby Boomers age 65+ (12.2%) (Samanage)
  • 19.2% of employees very often wake up to check email (Samanage)
  • 36.8% of employees checked work emails during dinner, just not recently, and 23.6% very often check work emails during dinner (Samanage)
  • 63.6% of Baby Boomers (ages 65+) said they have never checked work emails during dinner (Samanage)
  • 35.2% of employes spend more than 1 hour checking email outside of work (Samanage)
  • 10.5% of employees check work email after hours because their boss or client expects it  (Samanage)
  • 36.8% said they had said checked work emails during dinner, just not recently, and nearly one in four check work emails during dinner very often (23.6%) (Samanage)
  • 20% of U.S. adults admitted negative feelings, including feeling overwhelmed and frustrated, toward checking email outside of work (Samanage)
  • Executives cite a high level of education or institutional training as the most important employee attribute, only 23% say they offer development and training as a benefit (Oxford Economics
  • 84% of organizations offer their staff some form of professional development opportunities (SHRM
  • 91% of organizations offer paid professional memberships (SHRM
  • 42% of organizations offer cross-training to develop skills not directly related to employees’ current jobs (SHRM
  • 46% of employees say their company's training courses/methods make them less likely to leave (CompTIA
  • Percent of employees offered the following benefits: health insurance (76%), retirement savings plan (67%), dental insurance (66%), vision insurance (60%), life insurance (58%), short-term disability insurance (55%), long-term disability insurance (49%), AD&D (48%), pension (38%), long-term care insurance (25%), retiree insurance (22%) (EBRI
  • Percent of employees who accept the following benefits: health insurance (83%), life insurance (81%), dental (80%), retirement savings plan (80%), pension (76%), vision insurance (73%), short-term disability (71%), AD&D (70%), long-term disability (66%) (EBRI
  • 83% of organizations offer company paid group life insurance, 58% offered life insurance for dependents, and 21% offered accelerated death benefits (SHRM
  • 78% of employees rate health insurance in their top two most desired benefits, 37% rate retirement savings plan in their top two (down from 67% in 1999), 26% rate PTO (up from 16% in 2004), traditional pensions were rated by 13% (down from 21% in 1999) (EBRI
  • 90% of organizations offer employees traditional 401(k) or similar defined contribution retirement savings plans (SHRM
  • 96% of organizations offer dental coverage to their employees (SHRM
  • 87% of employers offer a mail-order prescription program (SHRM
  • 30% of organizations offer employer contributions to HSAs, a 10 percentage point increase over the last five years (SHRM
  • 50% of companies agree that "voluntary benefits are a significant part of our company’s benefits strategy" (MetLife
  • 38% of employees are not very confident they made the right benefits decisions at annual enrollment (MetLife
  • 54% of employees claim they need more help understanding how their benefits work, and how those benefits can help meet their needs (MetLife
  • 43% of millennials and 30% of non-millennials are not reading most of their employee benefits handbooks; 11% of millennials haven’t even opened their handbooks (GuideSpark)
  • 23% of millennials and 36% of non-millennials don't know where their benefit handbooks are anymore (GuideSpark)
  • 45% of employees strongly agree their companies’ benefit communications helped them to understand how they would pay for specific services and effectively educated them on their benefit options (MetLife)
  • 88% of HR managers cite cost control as a very important benefits objective, 80% say optimizing benefits plans to reduce costs is a most important strategy (MetLife
  • 55% of employers will have implemented incentives and/or penalties in 2015 for wellness compliance (Wells Fargo
  • Engaged workers are 28% more likely than their actively disengaged peers to get involved in company-sponsored wellness programs (Gallup
  • 53% of employees would participate in an exercise program through their workplace to help lower their health insurance cost (Aflac
  • 33% of employees participate in workplace wellness or well-being programs (Flex+Strategy)
  • 20% of employees said even though their company provides a wellness program, they do not participate; 25% said wellness/wellbeing programming is not an option at their workplace (Flex+Strategy)
  • 61% of employees agree that they’ve made healthier lifestyle choices because of their company’s wellness program (Aflac
  • 26.3% of organizations planned to add wellness rewards and penalties in 2015 (SHRM
  • 81% of large employers and 49% of small employers offer employees programs to help them stop smoking, lose weight, or make other lifestyle or behavioral changes (Kaiser Family Foundation
  • 40% of organizations offered rewards or bonuses for completing certain health and wellness activities (SHRM
  • 80% of organizations provide wellness resources and information, and 70% offered wellness programs (SHRM
  • Among employees working at organizations with a wellness program, 43% say they are “actively involved” in the program (Modern Survey
  • 46% of organizations that provide health care coverage to their employees have increased employee participation in preventive health and wellness initiatives to control health care costs (SHRM
  • 46% of Millennials would be more likely to make a donation to a corporate giving program if a coworker encouraged them to (Case Foundation
  • Just 27% of Millennials would be more likely to donate to a CSR program if a direct supervisor suggested that they do so, 21% if the CEO asked (Case Foundation
  • 84% of Millennials made a corporate donation in 2014, 22% of those who gave said at least part of it was done through solicitation from an employer (Case Foundation
  • 60% of employees are willing to bear more of the cost in order to have a choice of benefits that meet their needs (MetLife
  • Eight in ten full-time employees would be motivated to use company-provided wearable tech that allows employers to track their health and wellness data (Cornerstone
  • 20% of employers have made adjustments in their offices to improve employee health and wellness (Work Design
  • 13% of organizations offer employer-sponsored personal shopping discounts (SHRM) 
  • 30% of organizations offer discount ticket service (SHRM) 
  • 79% of Millennials think they should be allowed to wear jeans to work (at least sometimes) versus 60% of Boomers (MTV
  • 36% of companies offer casual dress every day, 62% offer it one day per week (SHRM) 
  • 57% of IT employees see affordable benefits as more important than salary (CareerBuilder
  • 8% of companies offer a paid day off for the employee’s birthday (SHRM) 
  • 45% of companies offer a phone subsidy for business use of employees’ personal phones (SHRM
  • 34% of organizations provide employee discounts on company services (SHRM
  • 66% of organizations have an annual company outing (SHRM
  • 86% of organizations reported offering paid bereavement leave (SHRM
  • 76% of organizations provide free coffee (SHRM
  • 66% of employees whose offices provide free snacks or beverages report being extremely or very happy with their current job (PeaPod
  • 83% of employees agree "having healthy and fresh snack options (e.g., fruit, vegetables, yogurt, low-calorie snacks) provided in the workplace is a "huge" perk (PeaPod
  • 66% of millennials agree "If I found or was offered a job at another company with better perks, including availability of snacks, I would take it." (PeaPod
  • 37% of organizations offer acupressure/acupuncture medical coverage (SHRM)
  • 91% of organizations offer mental health coverage to their employees (SHRM
  • 88% of organizations offer on-site parking, 10% offer parking subsidies (SHRM
  • 70% of organizations allow employees to retain frequent flyer miles (SHRM
  • 8% of companies allow pets at the office (SHRM
  • 2% of organizations offered nap rooms in 2015 (SHRM
  • Highest paying companies in America, 2016: A.T. Kearney, Strategy&, Juniper Networks, McKinsey & Co., Google; 24 of 25 are in consulting or technology (Glassdoor)

 Miscellaneous Workplace Statistics

These don't necessarily fit into one of the above categories, but they're definitely impactful on employee engagement and as a result, customer engagement. They show a changing workplace, where it's becoming harder to attract top talent while transitioning to the unique millennial culture.

  • Total employer compensation costs for private industry workers averaged $29.99 per hour worked, vs $43.10 for state and local government employees (Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Employer costs for employee compensation averaged $31.93 per hour worked in March 2014 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)Annual-Cost-of-Employee-Benefits 
  • Wages and salaries averaged $21.96 per hour worked and accounted for 68.8% of these costs; benefits averaged $9.97 per hour worked and accounted for the remaining 31.2% (Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 20% of women vs. 44% of men say they are completely satisfied with the amount they earn (Gallup
  • 12% of women say they have been passed over for a promotion or other opportunity because of their gender (Gallup
  • 5% of men say they have been passed over for a promotion or other opportunity because of their gender (Gallup
  • 17% of working women say they have been denied a raise because of their gender (Gallup
  • 4% of working men say they have been denied a raise because of their gender (Gallup
  • 59% of men and 56% of women say advancing in their career is extremely or very important to them (Gallup
  • 75% of women do not believe men and women are paid equally, compared to 50% of men (Glassdoor
  • 54% of female employees say they are recognized when they do excellent work. For males, it is 61% (Modern Survey
  • When asked to rank what signified a career advancement to them, women ranked “more money” and “a higher title” higher than men, who ranked “more direct reports,” “expanded responsibility” and “more face time with company executives” higher than women (BambooHR)
  • 52% of U.S. employees say they have confidence in senior leadership at their organization (up from 41% three years ago) (Modern Survey
  • 65% of companies are experiencing problems attracting top performers (Towers Watson
  • 46% of employees said their organization hires highly qualified employees (Towers Watson
  • 90% of employees have left work, and 30% cut back by 6 or more hours per week due to family responsibilities (Care.com
  • 32% of employees say they have a job, not a career (Mercer
  • 44% of employees say that leadership at their companies is equipped to lead their organizations to success (Oxford Economics
  • 18% of those currently in management roles demonstrate a high level of talent for managing others, while another two in 10 show a basic talent for it (Gallup
  • Managers with high or basic talent levels account for 48% higher profit to their companies than average managers do (Gallup
  • 60% of executives think Millennials are frustrated with manager quality, only 18% of Millennials say they are (Oxford Economics
  • Only 26% of Baby Boomers follow their organization on social media. Among Gen Xers it is 40%. For Gen Y it is 49% (Modern Survey
  • 32% of all employees want to see and understand the progress they've made toward goals set by their manager (Ultimate Software
  • 42% of Millennials want feedback every week. This is over twice the percentage of every other generation (Ultimate Software
  • 28% millennials have texted a manager out of work hours for a non-work related issue, compared to only 10% of baby boomers (LinkedIn
  • It now takes the average worker until age 30 to earn the national median salary; young workers in 1980 reached that point in their careers at age 26 (Georgetown University
  • 88% of Millennials want their coworkers to be their friends (MTV
  • 68% of millennials would sacrifice a friendship with a colleague if it meant getting a promotion; 62% of Baby Boomers wouldn't even consider it (LinkedIn
  • 79% of employees become annoyed when their co-workers are promoted faster than they are (BambooHR
  • 89% of millennials regularly check work email after the work day has ended (Bentley University
  • 60% of Millennials say their employers expect them to be accessible during off hours (RingCentral
  • 70% of Millennials work up to 20 hours or more outside the office each week (RingCentral
  • 34% of Millennials would quit a job on the spot if their employer asked them to delete their Facebook page (Ultimate Software
  • 50% of millennials say their poor work ethic left them unprepared for their first job, followed closely by poor time management (47%) and organization (38%) skills (Bentley University
  • 66% of millennials would like to start their own business and 37% would like to work on their own (Bentley University
  • 63% of adults under 45 say that “owning their own business would be the best employment scenario” (Finn Futures
  • 30% of executives give special attention to the particular wants and needs of millennials (Oxford Economics
  • 28% of Millennials feel their current organization is making full use of their skills (Deloitte
  • 72% of Millennials feel their schooling did not effectively prepare them for the workforce (EdAssist
  • 6 in 10 Millennials cite a “sense of purpose,” as part of the reason they chose to work for their current employers (Deloitte
  • 40% of Millennials who plan to remain in their jobs beyond 2020 say their employers have a strong sense of purpose beyond financial success (Deloitte
  • 53% of millennials aspire to become the leader or most senior executive within their current organization (Deloitte
  • 71% of Millennials expecting to leave their employer in the next two years are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed (Deloitte
  • 70% of employees ranked being empowered to take action at work when a problem or opportunity arose as an important element of their engagement (SHRM)
  • One-third of millennials think socializing with coworkers will help them move up the ladder (compared to 5% of Baby Boomers) (LinkedIn
  • 67% of millennials are likely to share personal details including salary, relationships and family issues with co-workers, compared to only about one-third of baby boomers (LinkedIn
  • 41% of companies have made changes to adapt to younger workers (Duke/CFO
  • 43% of employees say that impromptu visits by coworkers are the biggest productivity killer (Cornerstone
  • 21% of employees steal from their offices (GetVoip
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Topics: Employee Engagement + Loyalty, Benefits Trends

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Marketing Communications Manager for Access Development. Frequent blogger on customer engagement & loyalty, social media, and public relations.
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