Back in the day employee benefits were something nice to have; a way to stand out in a high-demand marketplace and keep employees around.

Today, employee benefits still serve those basic purposes, but they live in a world with lots of complicating factors and nuance. Keeping up with regulations alone is challenging enough. Good luck staying on top of trends and what inspires people to stay or move.

Access Perks is here to help. We're capturing every relevant piece of information on employee benefits, perks and compensation, and sharing them out here (with links to original sources).

By relevant, we mean released within the past couple years, and primarily geared toward our American and global audiences.

Check them out here:

 

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We used to keep these statistics on our employee engagement and loyalty stats page, but we feel like benefits are complex enough to merit their own collection. Like each of our stat pages, we'll update this one on a weekly basis.

Have data you'd like to see on these pages? Drop us a link in the comments.

This page is brought to you courtesy of Access Perks, our employee discount program built for small- and medium-sized businesses. Click here to check it out and learn more

Benefits and Employee Engagement/Retention/Recruitment Stats

  • 79% of employers believe offering benefits to employees is a critical component of attracting talent (Burson Marsteller)
  • 83% of employers say retaining employees is their top benefits objective (MetLife)
  • 51% of employers plan to leverage benefits as a retention strategy in the next three to five years (MetLife)
  • 75% of employees reported they’re more likely to stay with their employer because of their benefit program (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 35% of millennials have turned down job offers because they were dissatisfied with the benefits, compared to 27% of all other age categories (Anthem)
  • Employees who are very satisfied w/ benefits are almost 4x more likely to be very satisfied with their jobs (MetLife)
  • 33% of the Workforce Has Turned Down a Job Due to Lack of Benefits (LendingTree)
  • One in three millennial workers, and 27% of other employees, has turned down a job offer due to insufficient or lackluster health insurance (Anthem)
  • 76% of millennials reported that benefits customization is important for increasing their loyalty, compared to 67% of baby boomers (MetLife)
  • 68% of employers believe health benefit plans affect their reputations and can raise employee morale and satisfaction (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 75% of employers say that retaining and attracting quality employees were important outcomes of benefits (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 68% of employers say improving employee morale and satisfaction is an important consideration in employee benefits; 67% cite improving employee health (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 59% of employees say employee benefits are “very important” to how they feel about their job and their employer, 36% said benefits are “somewhat important (One Medical)
  • 69% of employees report that they might choose one job over another if it offered better benefits (One Medical)
  • 62% of employees under 50 wouldn't consider working for a company that didn't offer voluntary benefits (BenefitsPro)
  • 59% of employees say that health and wellness benefits are important for increasing loyalty to their employer and 53% say the same about financial planning programs (MetLife)
  • 42% of employees say improving their benefits package is one thing their employers could do to keep them in their jobs; the second most mentioned after “increase my salary” (Aflac)
  • 72% of employees say that having the ability to customize their benefits would increase their loyalty to their current employer (MetLife)
  • 30% of US workers worry about having their benefits reduced (Gallup)
  • 36% of employees stay at their companies for benefits and perks (Gusto)
  • 15% of employees have left or turned down a job due to the benefits it offered in the last 12 months (Aflac)
  • 46% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to look for new jobs in the next 12 months (compared to 57% of those who are unsatisfied) (Aflac)
  • 60% of employees are likely to take a job with lower pay but better benefits (Aflac)
  • Generation X (15%) and Generation Y (12%) have considered changing employers to one that offers better benefits in the last 12 months  (Barclays)
  • 94% of Millennials, 92% of Gen X say nontraditional benefits make employers more attractive (ICIMS)
  • 64% of millennials say benefits are extremely or very important to employer loyalty (Aflac)
  • 62% of US workers say ‘better-than-average pay and benefits’ is a leading workplace differentiator (Aon Hewitt)
  • 69% of employees are not satisfied with the employee benefits they are currently offered (ICIMS)
  • 92% of full-time employees believe that companies that offer nontraditional benefits are more likely to recruit top-tier talent (ICIMS)
  • 19% of employers altered their benefits programs to aid in employee retention over the last year (SHRM)
  • 65% of employees are more likely to recommend their employer as a good place to work because of the benefits offered (Lodestar)
  • 62% of all employees look to their employers for help in achieving financial security through employee benefits (MetLife)
  • 16% of employees have left a job or turned down a job in the last 12 months due to the benefits offered (Aflac)
  • 96% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are satisfied with their jobs (Aflac)
  • 51% of employees are extremely or very satisfied with their benefits packages (Aflac)
  • 87% of employees from Generation X and Generation Y feel their current benefits package is not sufficiently flexible to meet their personal and financial needs (Barclays)
  • 36% of employees say improving their benefits package is one thing their employer could do to keep them in their jobs (Aflac)
  • 54% of employees choose "benefits and paid time off" as what drives engagement most (Namely)
  • 37% of employees say they have seen some degree of improvement in their benefits (Lodestar)
  • 54% of On-Demand Economy workers believe they should receive more benefits as part of their job (Burson Marsteller)
  • 19% of employers say taking care of my employees by offering the widest range of benefits options is the most important objective of their benefits programs (Aflac)
  • 74% of employees want better benefits (BambooHR)
  • 62% of employees would leave a job for better benefits (Care.com)
  • 50% of employees cite benefits as an important reason they remain with their current employer (MetLife)
  • 70% say that benefits that can be customized to meet their needs would increase their loyalty to their employers (MetLife)
  • At companies where employees are offered no benefits, only 46% of employees would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • At companies offering 1-5 benefits, 53% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife
  • At companies offering 11 or more benefits, 66% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • 87% of employers say retention is a very important benefits objective (MetLife)
  • 41% of employers ranked retention as their top employee benefits objective  (MetLife)
  • 23% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to have been distracted at work by a personal issue (compared to 33% of those who are unsatisfied) (Aflac)
  • 88% of executives and 85% of benefit managers agree that benefit programs have the most impact on improving employee loyalty as well as increasing employee engagement and lowering company medical costs (Wells Fargo)
  • Nearly 40% of employees say having a wide selection of benefits would make them feel more loyal to their employer (MetLife)
  • Most important factors in Millennial workplace selection: career advancement, salary, benefits, work-life balance and job security (Boston College)
  • 26% of job offers are rejected due to benefits/salary not meeting expectations (MRI Network)
  • Benefits students look for from employers: More than two weeks of vacation, Tuition reimbursement for advanced education, Promised annual salary increase, Company match for 401(k), Casual dress policy (NACE)
  • 80% of government workers are satisfied with the benefits that their employer offers (Gallup
  • 57% of nongovernment workers are satisfied with the benefits that their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 51% of millennials say benefits are where their current employer has the most room for improvement (Aon Hewitt
  • 57% of people say benefits and perks are among their top considerations before accepting a job (Glassdoor)
  • 78% said that the employee benefits package is very or extremely important in their decision to accept or reject a job (EBRI
  • 31% of employees are only somewhat satisfied with the benefits offered by their current employer; 26% are not satisfied (EBRI
  • 26% of small-business employees would jump ship to a larger company if it meant better benefits offerings (Aflac)
  • 72% of small-business employees say an improvement in their benefits offerings would make them even happier (Aflac)
  • 50% of small-business employees say that having a benefits package is either extremely or very important to their happiness (Aflac)
  • Among small business employees, 33% saying they’re “satisfied” with the benefits they receive, 20% are “disappointed,” 13% are “happy,” 3% are “angry.” (Aflac)
  • 50% of employees are satisfied with their benefits (MetLife
  • Of the 79% of employees who have no intention to change jobs, 54% cite liking the people they work with, 50% cite good work/life balance, and 49% cite good benefits as reasons for staying (CareerBuilder
  • Top employer attributes that jobseekers value most: salary and employee benefits, long-term job security, pleasant working atmosphere (Randstad)
  • 26% of workers said that providing special corporate perks is an effective way to improve employee retention (CareerBuilder
  • 41% of employed patients and survivors indicate health insurance is one of the primary reasons they want to work (Cancer and Careers)
  • 42% of employed cancer patients and survivors feel they need to stay at their current workplace because they need health insurance (Cancer and Careers)
  • 35% of employed cancer patients and survivors are afraid to change their work status because it would limit their health insurance options (Cancer and Careers)
  • 91% of employees say implementing pet-friendly policies would increase company loyalty (Banfield)
  • Millennials are far more likely to continue employment at a company that implements pet-friendly policies (60%) than their elders (39%) (Banfield)
  • 53% of employees said that financial planning programs are important for increasing loyalty (MetLife)New Call-to-action

Salary and Base Compensation Stats

  • The United States is projected to have an average of 2.7% actual wage growth (accounting for inflation) in 2016, the largest increase in three years (KFHG)
  • Wages increased 1.9% and inflation declined by 0.2% from 2014 to 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • The most important benefits and incentives to American employees are: competitive compensation (84%), retirement plans (75%), and vacation time (62%) (Oxford Economics
  • 33% of organizations are offering higher salaries than they were last year (Randstad)
  • Base pay is expected to rise 3.0 percent in 2017, up slightly from 2.8 percent in 2016 (Aon Hewitt)
  • Pay raises will likely remain stagnant at 3% in 2017 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 98% of employers are planning to give employees raises in 2017 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 41% of employees were satisfied with the amount of money they earned in 2016 (Gallup)
  • 20% of U.S. workers say they are making less money than five years ago (Gallup)
  • 10% of organizations froze salaries in 2016 (Aon Hewitt)
  • US businesses are planning to boost pay by around 3% on average in 2017, the same as 2016 (WorldatWork)
  • Workers’ wages on average rose only 2% in 2016 (Colonial Life)
  • 99% of employers plan to give annual wage increases, averaging 3.0%; executives can expect increases averaging 3.1% (Willis Towers Watson)
  • The average 2017 total salary increase budget is 3.0%, the same as it has been for the past 3 years (WorldatWork)
  • Base salary increases are being awarded to 89% of employees in 2017 (WorldatWork)
  • 18.6% of companies plan to award merit increases of up to 2.5% in 2017; 45.1% plan on 2.51% to 5%; 2.1% plan on 5.01% to 10%; 1.6% plan on 10% or greater (BLR)
  • Promotional increases were awarded to 7.9% of employees in 2016 (WorldatWork)
  • Of the promotional increases received, the size of the average pay was 8.4% (WorldatWork)
  • 29.2% of employers did not award merit increases in 2016 (BLR)
  • 49.2% of employers did not offer general increases in 2017 (BLR)
  • 86.9% of employers did not reward employees who failed to meet the requirements of their jobs in 2016, and 57.2% didn’t reward employees needing improvement (BLR)
  • Exempt workers will receive 4.5% on average, or 73% more than the 2.6% raises average performers can expect in 2018; below-average performers can expect increases of about 1.0% (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 70% of HR leaders say they’ll have to pay workers increased wages as the the talent pool thins (CareerBuilder)
  • 53% of workers say they would prefer a salary increase over any other perk (Teem)
  • 78% of American workers are living paycheck to paycheck (CareerBuilder)
  • 20% of US workers worry about pay cuts (Gallup)
  • 55% of Americans experience serious monthly variations in income (JP Morgan Chase)
  • 77% of executives say that wages are the most important job factor for employees, beating out health insurance by nearly 28% (Adecco)
  • 10% of workers earning $100,000 or more live paycheck to paycheck (CareerBuilder)
  • 36% of employees say that “appreciation is best demonstrated with money” (AttaCain)
  • 41% of employees say a significant increase in income is very important to them when considering a new job (Gallup)
  • 20% of organizations have plans to offer higher starting salaries going into the second part of 2016, by as much as 5% higher; 53% plan to raise starting salaries by more than 5% (CareerBuilder)
  • 60% of current undergrads expect jobs to start at $60,000 annually; 10% expect starting salaries of $100,000 a year (Yello)
  • College seniors expect to earn approximately $53,483 at their first job after college (iCIMS)
  • 54% of college seniors said they expect $50,000+, a 12% increase from 2016; on average, entry-level employees can expect to earn approximately $45,361 (iCIMS)
  • 44% of men expect to eventually make $100,000, compared to 20% of women (CareerBuilder)
  • 43% of young women expect to make less than $35,000 in their first job, compared to 34% of men (Adecco Staffing)
  • Women in the workforce receive just 82% of the pay that men do in similar positions (Women’s Policy Research)
  • 60% of women feel underpaid (Paysa)
  • Women working full-time, on average, make 79 cents to the man’s dollar (Prudential)
  • Men (56%) are more comfortable negotiating salary than women (38%) (Jobvite)
  • The median annual income of women age 65 and older is 42% lower than men (Prudential)
  • 41% of women never ask their current employers for a raise (Paysa)
  • Employers deny women a raise more often than men, at 42% versus 33% (Paysa)
  • 29% of job seekers negotiated their salary at their current or most recent job (Jobvite)
  • 71% of workers don't ask for more money in their current or most recent jobs (Jobvite)
  • 84% of workers who negotiate a higher wage are successful (Jobvite)
  • 39% of managers said asking for a 5% raise is asking for too much money (Paysa)
  • Employees earn a 5.2% pay increase on average when changing jobs (Glassdoor)
  • A 10% increase in base pay increases the odds an employee will stay at the company by 1.5 percent (Glassdoor)
  • 60% of hiring managers report job seekers are asking for more money compared to six months ago. In healthcare, this rises to 66% (DHI Group)
  • 72% of candidates want to hear about salary range during job interviews (LinkedIn)
  • 59% of IT professionals feel they’re underpaid; 24% don’t expect a raise of more than 5% in 2017 (Spiceworks)
  • 15% of organizations offered specific retention bonuses to executive-level employees, and 15% offered them to nonexecutive employees (SHRM)
  • 97% of employees want to be recognized and rewarded for contributions beyond the organization’s financial results and activity metrics (Mercer)
  • 79% of employees would prefer new or additional benefits to a pay increase (Glassdoor)
  • 76% of employees reported a salary increase or promotion after completing an online certification (Simplilearn)
  • Benefits that employees say would increase engagement and loyalty: compensation (40%), better benefits (36%), career advancement opportunities (34%), training/education (31%), coworkers they like (18%), corporate culture (18%) (Workforce 2020)
  • 70% of employees reported that increasing salaries is the best way to boost employee retention, 58% said better benefits (CareerBuilder
  • 53% of employees think their pay is fair compared with their counterparts outside the company (Willis Towers Watson)
  • When comparing similar jobs in the same company, 55% of employees think their pay is fair (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 38% of workers feel they are fairly paid (Aon Hewitt)
  • Employees who received the highest performance ratings received an average salary increase of 4.6% in 2016, compared to the 2.6% increase given to employees receiving an average rating (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 68% of Millennials say compensation is the most important aspect of their workplace (Oxford Economics
  • 68% of people say that salary and compensation is among their top considerations before accepting a job (Glassdoor)
  • 22% of employees say compensation is the major factor determining happiness in the workplace (Spherion
  • 76% of Hiring Managers believe Millennials are motivated by money (Elance/Odesk)
  • 77% of Millennials would be willing to take a salary cut in exchange for long-term job security (Qualtrics)
  • 90% of millennials would choose to stay in a job for the next 10 years if they knew they'd get annual raises and upward career mobility (Qualtrics)
  • 43% of employees expect a pay raise in the next 12 months (Glassdoor
  • Of those who expect a pay raise, 49% expect it to be between 3-5% (Glassdoor)
  • 28% of employers believe “that most or all of their employees understand the company’s compensation philosophy.” (WorldatWork
  • 82% of employers give out bonuses (WorldatWork
  • 45% of companies offer spot bonuses/awards, or unscheduled bonuses for exceptional performance (SHRM
  • 41% of Millennials say higher compensation would increase their loyalty and engagement with the company (Oxford Economics
  • 39% of employees say higher compensation would increase loyalty and engagement with their current job (Oxford Economics
  • 15% of employees have taken a pay cut to work for a sustainable company (Bain & Co)
  • Reasons why retirees return to the workforce, according to HR professionals: money (72%), occupying time (58%), health care benefits (45%), social interaction (42%) (SHRM)
  • 39% of executives say their company offers competitive compensation (Oxford Economics
  • 38% of millennials say money would motivate them to work harder and stay with their employer longer (opportunities for advancement was cited by 30%, meaningful work 15%, good boss 7%, and working for a fast-growing company 6%) (Millennial Branding/Randstad)
  • Salary and "meaningful work" are the most important benefits potential employees look for (Millennial Branding/Beyond.com
  • 34% of stay-at-home mothers say earning enough money to pay for childcare is a "major factor" in their employment decisions (Gallup)
  • 90% of organizations provide severance packages, 38% offer the benefit to all workers (RiseSmart)
  • 57% of IT employees see affordable benefits as more important than salary (CareerBuilder
  • Bisexual women earn 7% to 28% less than heterosexual women after education, age and occupation are factored in (Indiana University)
  • Bisexual men earn 11% to 19% less than heterosexual men after education, age and occupation are factored in (Indiana University)
  • 54% of employees have had a paycheck problem while being paid (Kronos)
  • 15% of salaried workers have been shortchanged on a paycheck; 16% reported being paid late; 23% said they have been paid early (Kronos)
  • 80% of companies are paying salespeople inaccurate commission rates (WorldatWork)
  • 18% of employers don't report commission results to salespeople; 47% are slow to process commission payments, sometimes taking four or more weeks (WorldatWork)
  • 42% of employees said taxes and deductions on their paychecks are confusing to read and understand (Kronos)
  • 45% of employees would feel more engaged with their job if their employer helped them better understand the impact of taxes and deductions (Kronos)
  • 80% of employers say they pay U.S.-born workers and immigrants the same for doing the same job (CareerBuilder)
  • Employers planned to pay high-skilled H-1B visa holders a median salary of $80,000 in 2016, up from $69,000 a decade ago (Pew)
  • The median salary for H-1B visa holders is higher than the median wage for U.S. workers in similar jobs, who earned a median wage of $75,036 in 2016 (Pew)
  • 40% of CIOs say salary demands is the top barrier to securing the best IT job candidates (Robert Half)

Healthcare and Wellness Benefits Stats

  • 34% of employees feel “extremely satisfied” with the benefit options their employers offer, up from just 22% in 2012 (Connecture)
  • 80% of “best in class” employers offer health insurance (Adecco)
  • 92% of employers said they are “very confident” their organization will continue to sponsor health benefits in five years (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 95% of HR pros rate healthcare as one of the three most important benefits to employees; 71% say retirement savings and planning, 50% say leave (SHRM)
  • 75% of employees are more likely to stay with their employer because of their health benefits plan (Liazon)
  • 96% of millennials say great health-care benefits are important in choosing a job, more important than frequent raises (94%) and promotions (82%) (Bentley University)
  • Healthcare benefits (68%), paid family sick leave (54%) and flexible scheduling benefits (47%) are the most popular perks among Millennial employees (ReportLinker)
  • 19% of American workers say their employer does not discuss the specifics of their health care benefits at all (Zocdoc)
  • 34% of employees have children under 18 covered on their health plans (Aflac)
  • 55% of employees whose companies offer health insurance say they would like help from their employer when choosing a health plan (Jellyvision)
  • 49% of employees say making health insurance decisions is always very stressful (Jellyvision)
  • 41% of employees can’t identify all of the elements that add up to the full cost of their health care (Jellyvision)
  • 25% of employees said they would rather file their annual income taxes than select a health plan (United Healthcare)
  • 41% of employees feel the open enrollment process at their company is extremely confusing (Jellyvision)
  • 73% of employees feel confident about health insurance details like deductible size, but only 53% know their out-of-pocket maximums and just 47% know their employer’s contributions (Jellyvision)
  • 32.8% of Americans would like to see an improvement of their health benefits (LendingTree)
  • 85% of employees feel more engaged in their health care decisions (Liazon)
  • 63% of employees are not willing to spend at least an hour a day on health-related activities (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 38% of employees use online tools to shop for group or employer-sponsored insurance: up from 9.5% five years ago (Connecture)
  • 59% of employees wouldn’t spend more than one hour to research and choose their health plan; nearly 50% said they’re not sure what they pay in health care costs each month (Connecture)
  • 52% of employees are willing to bear more of the cost of their benefits in order to have a broader array of offerings that suit their personal needs (MetLife)
  • 40% of the workforce would take a paycut for better health insurance (LendingTree)
  • 87% of employees feel more customized benefit choices that better fit their lives would help them feel more confidence in their plan choices (Sun Life)
  • 32% of people are uncomfortable navigating medical benefits and the healthcare system (Accolade)
  • Just 7% of employees can successfully define four basic health insurance concepts: plan premium, deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximum (United Healthcare)
  • 9 in 10 consumers report dealing with health benefits and health-related issues at work (Accolade)
  • Employed adults spend an average of 3.5 hours each month dealing with and researching health benefits, insurance, or other health-related issues (Accolade)
  • 15% of Gen Z and 19% of Millennials say health care is the most important employee benefit (Future Workplace)
  • 70% of Gen Z said their top priority is health insurance (Monster)
  • 43% of employees have medical coverage through their job and only 33% have a 401(k) plan through their company (Jobvite)
  • Employees now pay for about 43% of health care expenses (Milliman)
  • The cost of health care benefits is projected to rise 7.8% in 2017, an increase from 7.3% in 2016 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • From 2016 to 2017, health care costs increased for 79% of organizations, with an 11% increase on average (SHRM)
  • 97% of organizations are very or somewhat concerned about controlling healthcare costs (SHRM)
  • The $25,826 in healthcare costs for a typical family of four covered by an employer-sponsored preferred provider plan is $1,155 higher than last year (Milliman Medical Index)
  • Of that $25,826, employers pay $14,793, or 57% - a 4% decrease from 2001 (Milliman Medical Index)
  • Healthcare costs for active workers doubled from 2001 to 2015, from 5.7% to 11.5%  (Willis Towers Watson)
  • Healthcare expenses are expected to rise by 5.5% in 2018, up from a 4.6% increase in 2017 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • The average health care rate increase for midsize and large companies was 3.9% in 2017; the average healthcare cost increases for midsize and large companies will be 4.% after plan design changes and vendor negotiations in 2018 (Aon)
  • The average deductible for employer-sponsored health plans increased by 13% in 2016 (Colonial Life)
  • Large employers predict a 5% hike in medical and pharmacy benefits costs in 2018 for the fifth straight year in a row (NBGH)
  • 2017 estimated total healthcare costs is $13,482 per employee - expected to rise to $14,156 in 2018; employers' share of the cost will be 70% and employees will cover about 30%, or about $4,400 (NBGH)
  • 2018’s average healthcare cost increase for U.S. employees is projected to be 7.2%, up from 6.9% in 2017 (Aon)
  • The average costs for health care, including employee premiums and out-of-pocket costs, are projected to be $5,248, up from $4,895 in 2017, and employee premium costs are projected to average $2,678 (Aon)
  • Employees at small organizations pay an average of $3,557 annually for the cost of their coverage, with their employers paying $9,474 of the balance (United Benefits Advisors)
  • Employees at large companies pay $3,378 annually, while their organizations pay $9,727 (United Benefits Advisors)
  • Average out-of-pocket costs for employees are projected to be $2,570, 17% of the total health care cost (Aon)
  • 28% of employees with health insurance through work facing an out-of-pocket expense of $5,000 or more would use their personal savings to pay rather than other means, including an HSA (8%) or supplemental group insurance (7%) (Securian)
  • 21% of employees say they do not know how they would pay for an out-of-pocket expense (21%); 12% say they would need to rely on credit cards, 7% said a loan from their 401(k) (7%), 4% said they’d borrow from family/friends (4%), 2% would sell/pawn a personal possession (2%) (Securian)
  • 42% of workers say paying for out-of-pocket medical expenses would be the top financial concern when facing a debilitating injury; 58% say their top concern would be lost wages from work, the ability to pay for regular monthly expenses such as groceries, or the need to take on additional expenses such as lawn care or cleaning (Securian)
  • Employees will spend an average of $5,200 in health care costs next year (Aon)
  • Increases in employee contributions to the cost of premiums (48%) and higher cost sharing through plan design changes (48%) remain the top two health care cost-control tactics (AJG)
  • Some of the tactics employers expect to adopt to help control costs by 2019 include cost-transparency tools (24%) and healthcare decision support (19%) (AJG)
  • The median in-network deductible on employer-sponsored PPO health plans increased 50% from $1,000 to $1,500 in 2016 (United Benefit Advisors)
  • The average health plan costs for employers decreased slightly from $9,736 in 2015 to $9,727 in 2016 (United Benefit Advisors)
  • Medical insurers project the healthcare benefits costs to rise by 9.1% in 2016, an increase from 8.0% in 2015 and 7.5% in 2014 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • Overall cost increases of healthcare benefits will hold steady at 6% in 2017 (NGBH)
  • 98% of all employers now offer healthcare coverage for full-time employees; 23% offer coverage for part-time employees (SHRM)
  • 57% of organizations offer health benefits to at least some of their employees (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 87% of midsize employers offer PPO health coverage (BenefitFocus)
  • Among employers with 50+ full-time employees, 4% reported switching full-time employees to part time status (4%), changing part-time workers to full-time workers (10%), reducing the number of full-time employees they intended to hire (5%) or increasing waiting periods (2%) in response to the employer shared responsibility provision which took effect for some firms in 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 80% of employers who hire independent contractors offer healthcare benefits to full-time, W2-based employees, only 17% offer those same benefits to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 34% of companies now offer healthcare coverage to part-time employees (SHRM)
  • Among part-time employees, 25% have medical insurance, 18% have dental insurance and 14% have disability insurance and only 13% have life insurance through their employer (Guardian Life)
  • 24% of part-time workers “feel good” that they could pay a $3,000 medical bill, compared to 34% of their full-time colleagues (Guardian Life)
  • 19% of employers (and 50% of large employers) use a specialty pharmacy benefit manager (AJG)
  • 62% of employers are currently evaluating pharmacy benefit contract terms, with another 32% planning to or considering to by 2019 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 60% recently adopted new coverage or utilization restrictions as part of specialty pharmacy strategy, with another 24% planning to or considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 44% address specialty drug costs and utilization performance through medical benefits, with another 38% planning to or considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 31% of large firms offering health benefits provide an incentive to complete a health risk assessment (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 65% of companies offer personal health risk assessments; 71% cover second medical opinions; 54% cover biometric screenings; 48% cover lifestyle and health education (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 91% of employees would engage in healthier behaviors if they were rewarded (Welltok)
  • 64% of employees say they believe that keeping employees healthy should be one of the top goals of a company’s benefits program (One Medical)
  • Healthcare costs have dropped from 11.6% to 8% since 2010 (Xerox HR)
  • Healthcare costs to organizations will rise by 6% in 2017 (CEB)
  • The average cost of providing healthcare makes up 7.6% of a company’s annual operating budget (SHRM)
  • The average cost per covered employee has increased by nearly $500 from 2015 to 2016 (SHRM)
  • 24% of employers only offer high-deductible health plans, doubling the percentage from 2012 (PwC)
  • 24% of workers were enrolled in high-deductible health plans in 2015, up from 20% in 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 68% of employees say their organization offers healthcare benefits (ReportLinker)
  • 87% of midsize employers offer PPO health coverage (BenefitFocus)
  • SMBs are contributing nearly 25% more than legally required to their employees’ monthly premiums, covering on average 73% of the total cost (Zenefits)
  • With a 49% adoption rate, PPOs are the most popular type of SMB benefits plan (Zenefits)
  • Employees who select HDHPs earn 17% more than employees who choose preferred provider organization plans (Benefitfocus)
  • 29% of all insured employees were enrolled in HDHPs in 2016; up 9% since 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 34% of employees at midsize companies go with a HDHP option (BenefitFocus)
  • 40% of Millennials over age 26 opt in to HDHPs (BenefitFocus)
  • 70% of employers offer PPO plans; 67% offer FSAs; 59% offer HSAs; 53% offer HDHPs (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 14% of the U.S. population is enrolled in a CDHP and 14% is enrolled in an HDHP (EBRI)
  • 50% of employees are not knowledgeable about HDHPs (Jellyvision)
  • The number of education industry employers offering HDHPs doubled to 44% over the past year (BenefitFocus)
  • 61% of manufacturers adopted HDHPs in 2017 (BenefitFocus)
  • HDHP adoption also increased 30% among retail employees over the past year (BenefitFocus)
  • HMOs account for 37% of enrollment choices in education (BenefitFocus)
  • 26.4% of all employees are now enrolled in a CDHP (United Benefit Advisors)
  • Among individuals enrolled in CDHPs, 56% opened an HSA, 19% were in an HRA, and 25% were enrolled in an HSA-eligible health plan but had not opened an HSA (EBRI)
  • 20% of CDHP enrollees reported an employer contribution of at least $2,000 in 2016, up from 10% in 2014 (EBRI)
  • 45% of CDHP enrollees reported that their employer offered a health risk assessment, compared with 34% of traditional-plan enrollees and 30% of HDHP enrollees (EBRI)
  • 70% of CDHP and 67% of HDHP enrollees reported a cash incentive or reward for a biometric screening, compared with 51% among traditional-plan enrollees (EBRI)
  • PPO plans remain the most common plan type, enrolling 52% of covered workers in 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • For single coverage, 61% of covered workers are in plans that require them to make a contribution of less than or equal to a quarter of the total premium, 2% are in plans that require more than half of the premium, and 16% are in plans that require no contribution at all (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • For family coverage, 44% of covered workers are in plans that require them to make a contribution of less than or equal to a quarter of the total premium and 15% are in plans that require more than half of the premium, while only 6% are in plans that require no contribution at all (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 81% of covered workers have a general annual deductible for single coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 68% of covered workers have a copay for office visits with a primary care or specialist physician, in addition to any general annual deductible (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 99% of covered workers are in a plan that covers some prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 12% of covered workers enrolled in a plan with prescription drug coverage are enrolled in a plan with a separate annual drug deductible that applies only to prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation
  • 87% of employers offer a mail-order prescription program (SHRM
  • 92% of companies offer generic prescriptions, with 95% of organizations offering a 90-day mail-order prescription service (SHRM)
  • Compared with Gen X and boomers, millennials were more likely to ask for a generic form of medicine (47%), manage healthcare expenses through a budget (35%) and check their plans to ensure coverage (57%) (EBRI)
  • Opioid abusers cost employers nearly twice as much ($19,450) in medical expenses on average annually as non-abusers ($10,853) (Castlight)
  • 98% of covered workers are in plans with an out-of-pocket maximum for single coverage, significantly more than the 88% in 2013 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 47% of employers with 3 to 9 workers offer health insurance coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 23% of large firms that offer health benefits in 2015 also offer retiree health benefits (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 17% of small firms and 74% of large firms offer the option of contributing to a flexible spending account (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 96% of organizations offer dental coverage to their employees (SHRM
  • 99% of organizations offer dental plans (WorldAtWork)
  • 82% of employees cite dental insurance as a very important employee benefit; 54% consider it a “must-have” (Lincoln Financial Group)
  • 54% of employees say they’d like their employer to provide a list of local in-network dentists, and 34% would appreciate ratings or rankings of in-network dentists  (Lincoln Financial Group)
  • 69% of employers offer dependent care flexible spending accounts (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 30% of organizations offer employer contributions to HSAs, a 10 percentage point increase over the last five years (SHRM
  • 67% of employers offer HSAs; 15% offer employee-funded Health Reimbursement Arrangements (CEB)
  • Of employers who offer an HSA, 79% fund at least part of the account (Conrad Siegel)
  • 52% of employers offer HSAs and 77% offer HRAs (SHRM)
  • On average, employers contribute $576 to their employees’ HSA accounts and $1,885 to employee HRAs (SHRM)
  • 75.3% of employers see HSAs as part of their retirement benefits strategy (Plan Sponsor Council of America)
  • The average per-employee cost of HSA-eligible plans is 13% less than that of a traditional PPO (Mercer)
  • 55% of organizations offered HSAs in 2017, and 36% provided an employer contribution to the HSA (SHRM)
  • 53% of large employers offer HSA plans, 6% position it as a full replacement for traditional medical coverage (Mercer)
  • At companies that offer HSAs, only 24% of covered employees enroll in one (Mercer)
  • 40% of eligible employees choose an HSA to which their employer contributes versus 35% when there is no employer contribution (Mercer)
  • 60% of plan sponsors believe HSAs should replace flexible spending accounts (Plan Sponsor Council of America)
  • 47% of employers said their employees weren’t aware of the tax advantages of HSAs, flexible spending accounts and similar savings vehicles (Mercer)
  • In 2015, 13% of large employers and 42% of small employers automatically enroll eligible employees (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 63% of covered workers are enrolled in a plan that is either partially or completely self-funded (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 33% of companies offer cash compensation to their own employees who waive medical and drug insurance, an average of $2,083 (Conrad Siegel)
  • Across all plans, the average annual in-network deductible for employee-only coverage is $1,554; the total monthly premium for employee-only coverage is $461; and the total monthly premium for family coverage is $1,292 (SHRM)
  • Annual family premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance coverage climbed an average of 3%, to $18,142 in 2016 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 43% of insured employees have a tough time paying the deductible (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 29% of insured employees have problems paying medical bills; 73% of these report cutting back on spending on food, clothing, or basic household items (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 27% of insured employees have put off needed health care due to finances; 23% have skipped a recommended medical test; 21% have not filled a prescription (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • The average co-pay for in-network primary care office visits for employee-only coverage across all plans is $22 (SHRM)
  • Workers on average contribute $5,277 annually toward their family premiums (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 65% of employees have $1,000 or less to pay unexpected out-of-pocket medical expenses (Aflac)
  • 63% of employees with employer-provided benefits are concerned about how they will pay unexpected out-of-pocket costs (Sun Life)

  • 34% of employees do not make enough money to cover additional expenses like voluntary benefits (Sun Life)

  • 59% say they wouldn’t be able to adjust to the large financial costs associated with a serious injury or illness (Aflac)

  • 10 years after an injury, the average worker received 88% of the earnings and income benefits that an uninjured worker would have received (WCRI)

  • 29% of employers say they are now collaborating with outside organizations to find opportunities to reduce employee costs (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 44% of employees say they would have to borrow from their 401(k)s or use credit cards to cover unexpected out-of-pocket expenses (Aflac)

  • 55% of employees in lower-income households (less than $50,000 in household income per year) are not prepared to pay for costs associated with an unanticipated serious illness or accident not covered by major medical insurance (Aflac)

  • In 2015, 52% of employers did not offer coverage to spouses of employees eligible for workplace health care coverage, as opposed to 31% of companies reporting in 2014 (Conrad Siegel)

  • Spouses make up one-fifth of all people covered by an employer-sponsored plan, yet generate one-third of healthcare costs (Mercer)

  • 5% of the employer-insured population generates 50% of healthcare costs, while 15% generates 80% of healthcare costs (Big Bang Health)
  • 25% of employees have had difficulty paying a medical bill due to high medical costs (Aflac)
  • 38% of consumers with employee-provided insurance coverage asked about an alternative treatment because of costs (PWC)
  • 81% believe the medical costs they are responsible for will increase (Aflac)
  • 61% of employees are worried about having enough money to meet out-of-pocket medical costs that are not covered by health insurance (MetLife)
  • Just 16% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to put off a medical procedure longer than they should (Aflac)
  • 40% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the health insurance benefits their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 50% of employees strongly agree that because of the benefits they receive at work, they worry less about unexpected health and financial issues (MetLife)
  • The percentage of employers with fewer than 100 workers that offer healthcare benefits to their employees has declined an average of 24% since 2008 (Employee Benefit Research Institute)
  • % of employees offered the following benefits: health insurance (76%), retirement savings plan (67%), dental insurance (66%), vision insurance (60%), life insurance (58%), short-term disability insurance (55%), long-term disability insurance (49%), AD&D (48%), pension (38%), long-term care insurance (25%), retiree insurance (22%) (EBRI
  • %of employees who accept the following benefits: health insurance (83%), life insurance (81%), dental (80%), retirement savings plan (80%), pension (76%), vision insurance (73%), short-term disability (71%), AD&D (70%), long-term disability (66%) (EBRI
  • 34% of employees surveyed say they have disability insurance (OneAmerica)
  • Among employed Americans who do not have short- or long-term disability insurance provided by their employer, 43% say the reason is because their employer does not offer it (OneAmerica)
  • 23% of workers with a household income of less than $50,000 a year have employer-provided disability insurance (OneAmerica)
  • 34% of working women between 18 and 34 who lack disability insurance said they don’t have it because they think they are healthy and don’t need it (OneAmerica)
  • 83% of organizations offer company paid group life insurance, 58% offered life insurance for dependents, and 21% offered accelerated death benefits (SHRM
  • 78% of employees rate health insurance in their top two most desired benefits, 37% rate retirement savings plan in their top two (down from 67% in 1999), 26% rate PTO (up from 16% in 2004), traditional pensions were rated by 13% (down from 21% in 1999) (EBRI
  • 83% of insurance brokers report that employers look to them to manage health care spending (DirectPath)
  • 78% of insurance brokers have added new products and services in the past year to help their clients control healthcare costs (DirectPath)
  • Employers will select carriers vendors based on competitiveness of negotiated provider discounts (94%); competitiveness of vendor’s network access (94%); and competitiveness of vendor’s total cost of care (92%) (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 25% of American workers say they have utilized all of the preventive health benefits offered by their company (Zocdoc)
  • 50% of employed Americans would be more likely to work for or stay with an employer who is supportive of scheduling preventive care appointments or who gives them time off for preventive care appointments (49%) (Zocdoc)
  • 60% of American workers feel uncomfortable leaving work for preventive care appointments (Zocdoc)
  • 46% of American workers say that their manager has made them feel like they shouldn’t take time off work to go to preventive care appointments (Zocdoc)
  • 42% of American workers never see their CEO leaving work to go to preventive care appointments, and 29% never notice their manager leave for routine check-ups (Zocdoc)
  • 40% of American workers say they haven’t missed work even once in the past 12 months for a preventive care appointment (Zocdoc)
  • 86% of employees admitted they would cancel or reschedule a booked preventive care appointment due to workplace pressures (Zocdoc)
  • 50% of American workers say their employer has made them feel like they shouldn’t go to preventive care appointments during work hours (Zocdoc)
  • 28% of workers say they feel guilty for missing work and 24% say worrying about being judged would prevent them from going to an appointment during work hours (Zocdoc)
  • 30% of managers say they proactively encourage the employees they manage to take time off work for preventive care appointments (Zocdoc)
  • 38% of American workers think their colleagues would feel negatively if they were to take a day off work for a preventive care appointment (Zocdoc)
  • Employees would also be more likely to go to preventive care appointments if they were encouraged to do so by their employer, manager or co-workers (51%), or if their company gave them time off specifically for these types of appointments (46%) (Zocdoc)
  • 14% of workers don’t even know which preventive visits their insurance covers (Zocdoc)
  • 33% of health care workers never see their manager leave work for preventive care appointments (Zocdoc)
  • 96% of employers will use telehealth services (NBGH)
  • 78% of employers currently use telemedicine consultations, with another 16% planning to or considering to by 2019 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 70% of surveyed employers agree that access to care has been achieved in onsite clinics (SpringBuk)
  • Typical onsite clinic visits take only 30 minutes, compared to an average of 2.5 hours of lost time for off-site clinic visits (SpringBuk)
  • 75% of employers who offer onsite clinics specifically measure clinic ROI (SpringBuk)
  • 88% of employers report a positive ROI on their onsite clinic, with 41% reporting and ROI of between $1.50 and $2.99 for every dollar spent (SpringBuk)
  • 56% of employers plan to offer telehealth for behavioral health services (NBGH)
  • 36% of large companies will offer high-touch concierge services in 2018, up from 28% in 2017 (NBGH)
  • The use of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) could increase 100% by 2020, and 54% of employers will provide onsite or near site health centers in 2018 (NBGH)
  • 77% of employers offer free or discounted flu shots (IFEBP)
  • 40% of organizations offered rewards or bonuses for completing certain health and wellness activities (SHRM
  • 26.3% of organizations planned to add wellness rewards and penalties in 2015 (SHRM
  • 39% of employers throughout the world are now offering wellness or well-being programs (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 59% of companies offer a general wellness program (SHRM)
  • 80% of organizations provide wellness resources and information, and 70% offered wellness programs (SHRM
  • 33% of organizations said they are very likely to offer wellness benefits (MetLife)
  • 70% of employers are investing in wellness programs (United Healthcare)
  • 73% of employees say they are interested in wellness programs (United Healthcare)
  • 48% of employees are unsatisfied with their employers’ investments in wellness and preventative care (One Medical)
  • 59% of employees said that health and wellness benefits are important for increasing loyalty (MetLife)
  • 36% of employers said wellness benefits and financial planning programs are valuable to their employees (MetLife)
  • 18% of employers are looking to enhance wellness and preventative health programs (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 90% of benefits consultants say that their clients are shifting to a total well-being approach over physical health programs (ShortLister)
  • 73% of benefits consultants are prioritizing wellness/well-being as a business objective (ShortLister)
  • 16% of employers rely on health plan vendors to administer wellness programs and 14% enlist the expertise of an outsourced wellness vendor, including 24% of large employers (AJG)
  • 57% of benefits consultants are staying with the same wellness vendor, 34% are moving to a new one (ShortLister)
  • Engaged workers are 28% more likely than their actively disengaged peers to get involved in company-sponsored wellness programs (Gallup
  • 53% of employees would participate in an exercise program through their workplace to help lower their health insurance cost (Aflac
  • 77.6% would work out more if their employer had a gym they could use during work hours (Treadmill Reviews)
  • 76% of employees say they would work out if their employer had exercise equipment (Treadmill Reviews)
  • 40.1% of employees would approve of mandatory in-office exercise (Treadmill Reviews)
  • 59% of employees say they exercise on a regular basis (CareerBuilder)
  • 22% of U.S. workers who regularly work out four or more days a week say they lost weight at their present job (CareerBuilder)
  • 41% of workers don't work out regularly or at all, and 47% of this group say they gained weight at their current job (CareerBuilder)
  • 28% of employees say their company provides gym passes, workout facilities, or wellness benefits, but 63% of this group don't take advantage of them (CareerBuilder)
  • 77.6% of survey respondents would go along with mandatory in-office exercising if their employers had a gym that was accessible during work hours (Treadmill Reviews)
  • 44% of employees say the climate in their organization supports employee well-being (American Psychological Association)
  • 33% of employers say they are very likely to offer wellness benefits (MetLife)
  • 33% of employees participate in workplace wellness or well-being programs (Flex+Strategy)
  • 54% of benefits professionals cite employee morale as their most improved metric from implementing wellness programs (HUB)64% of workers say their employers do not offer wellness benefits, but if offered, 42% believe they would take advantage of them (CareerBuilder)
  • According to employers, the main goals of wellness programs are reducing health costs (60% of companies), investing in culture (43%), and improving employee experience and satisfaction (37%) (AJG)
  • Personal coaching drives as much as 70% of medical cost savings in wellness programs (HealthFitness)
  • 28% of employees participated in lifestyle coaching if a spouse was involved, compared to 14% with no spousal involvement (Mercer)
  • 88% of employers reported improvements in health risk with spousal involvement, compared to 81% without (Mercer)
  • 70% of HR pros expressed an interest in allowing employees dealing with addiction to take a break from work to receive treatment and helping them transition back to their position after completing rehab (National Safety Council)
  • 38% of employers offer wellness programs with a mental health or substance abuse component; 23% offer one with a stress-management program (IFEBP)
  • 72% of Millennials say wellness initiatives are the best way for their employers to help relieve stress (Udemy)
  • 95% of employees want healthcare packages that include mental health (Businessolver)
  • 33% of U.S. workers say they regularly participate in employer-provided health promotion programs (American Psychological Association)
  • 66% of companies see an ROI on their health and performance initiatives; 35% report improved productivity and 34% cite improved morale (Hub International)
  • 54.6% of employers would describe their wellness program as "metric-driven" (SpringBuk)
  • Among employers offering and measuring their wellness efforts, 50% have found a decrease in absenteeism, 63% are experiencing financial sustainability and growth, 66% reported increased productivity and 67% said employees are more satisfied (IFEBP)
  • Only 23% of employers say they measure ROI for traditional employee wellness initiatives (SpringBuk)
  • By 2018, 64% of U.S. employers will focus on developing workplace cultures that support employee well-being as a primary strategy to boost health engagement (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 56% of employers ask employees what’s missing from their well-being experience (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 35% of US employers invite family members to participate in well-being programs and activities (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 51% of employers say their senior leaders are visible champions of the organization’s health and well-being strategy (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 70% of employers have improved their physical environments to encourage healthy behaviors, including adding healthy foods to cafeteria menus, walking paths and campus bike-sharing programs (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 20% of employees said even though their company provides a wellness program, they do not participate; 25% said wellness/wellbeing programming is not an option at their workplace (Flex+Strategy)
  • 71% of employees prefer a phone conversation as their #1 communication preference about personal or emotional wellness issues; 65% prefer face-to-face meetings (Health Advocate)
  • 73% of employees with senior managers who show support through involvement and commitment to wellbeing initiatives said their organization helps employees develop a healthy lifestyle (American Psychological Association)
  • 74% of employers view wellbeing as an important to employees and a useful tool for recruiting and retaining staff (Xerox)
  • 83% of employers found financial well-being benefits improved performance and productivity among their employees, while 81% saw an improvement in employee morale (Xerox)
  • 18% of organizations offer financial planning programs (MetLife)
  • 51% of wellness programs address financial health, up from 38% in 2015 (Optum)
  • 34% of wellness programs cover financial wellbeing; 28% cover volunteer opportunities and 27% include community engagement (AJG)
  • 58% of employers have a tool available that covers at least one aspect of financial wellbeing, that percentage is expected to reach 84% by the end of 2017 (Aon Hewitt)
  • 60% of employers say the importance of employee financial wellness has increased over the past two years (Aon Hewitt)
  • 91% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts say they feel motivated to do their best (American Psychological Association)
  • 91% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts are satisfied with their job (American Psychological Association)
  • 91% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts have a positive relationship with supervisors (American Psychological Association)
  • 93% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts have a positive relationship with co-workers (American Psychological Association)
  • 89% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts are more likely to recommend their company as a good place to work (American Psychological Association)
  • 25% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts said they intend to leave their job in the next year (American Psychological Association)
  • 40% of working Americans said their senior managers are involved in and committed to well-being initiatives (American Psychological Association)
  • 61% of employees agree that they’ve made healthier lifestyle choices because of their company’s wellness program (Aflac
  • 81% of large employers and 49% of small employers offer employees programs to help them stop smoking, lose weight, or make other lifestyle or behavioral changes (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 47%  of wellness programs address employees’ social health, compared to 37% in 2015; 68% address behavioral health, up from 65% in 2015 (Optum)
  • The most common wellness benefit is providing resources and information (71% of companies), and 62% give wellness tips or information at least quarterly in the form of a newsletter, e-mail, column or tweets (SHRM)
  • 26% of employees have access to a corporate wellness programs, 63% don’t use them (CareerBuilder)
  • 85% of employees with access to a wellness program say they are “somewhat aware” or “very aware” of the details of the program (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 59% of employees with access to a workplace wellness program credit it with improving their health (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 39% of employers throughout the world are now offering wellness or well-being programs (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 73% of employees are interested in workplace wellness programs (UnitedHealthcare)
  • Among employees working at organizations with a wellness program, 43% say they are “actively involved” in the program (Modern Survey
  • 46% of organizations that provide health care coverage to their employees have increased employee participation in preventive health and wellness initiatives to control health care costs (SHRM
  • The number of insurance plans that offer wellness incentives rose to 58% from 50% between 2016 and 2017 (DirectPath)
  • 46% of Millennials would be more likely to make a donation to a corporate giving program if a coworker encouraged them to (Case Foundation
  • Just 27% of Millennials would be more likely to donate to a CSR program if a direct supervisor suggested that they do so, 21% if the CEO asked (Case Foundation
  • 84% of Millennials made a corporate donation in 2014, 22% of those who gave said at least part of it was done through solicitation from an employer (Case Foundation
  • 60% of employees are willing to bear more of the cost in order to have a choice of benefits that meet their needs (MetLife
  • 19% of employers offer gym/fitness membership (ReportLinker)
  • Eight in ten full-time employees would be motivated to use company-provided wearable tech that allows employers to track their health and wellness data (Cornerstone)
  • 19% of employers currently encourage the use of mobile apps for condition management or health risk reduction to their employees, with another 28% planning to or considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 26% of employers currently promote wearable devices for tracking physical activity, with another 18% planning to or considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 35% of employers use wearable devices in their wellness programs, a 10% increase since 2015 (SpringBuk)
  • 48.6% of employers are considering purchasing wearable fitness devices for employees over the next twelve months (SpringBuk)
  • 30% of companies will offer subsidies or discounts on wearables (Fidelity)
  • Employees who opted in to a wearable device program cost, on average, $1,242 less than other employees (SpringBuk)
  • Among employees without an activity tracker, 62% said they would be interested in using a wearable fitness tracker as part of a workplace wellness program (UnitedHealthcare)
  • When considering a wearable device for their population, 60% of employers cited "app usability" as a "very important" feature (SpringBuk)
  • Employers indicated that $79 was the ideal per-unit price when purchasing wearable devices for their population (SpringBuk)
  • 44.1% of employers surveyed use wearable device data in the strategic planning of their wellness initiatives (SpringBuk)
  • 48.6% of employers surveyed are considering purchasing devices for their population over the next 12 months (SpringBuk)
  • 20% of employers have made adjustments in their offices to improve employee health and wellness (Work Design
  • 51% of employers offer price comparison tools, 18% plan to add similar tools in the next three years (CEB)
  • 29% of health benefit plan sponsors offer a price comparison tool (HealthMine)
  • 42% of employee in wellness programs say having a price comparison tool in their wellness program is “very important,” and 48% said it would be “nice to have.” (HealthMine)
  • 81% of wellbeing program participants saw a positive impact on their physical well-being (Welltok)
  • 74% of businesses with holistic wellness programs said employee satisfaction increased (Virgin Pulse)
  • 78% of the businesses say employee wellbeing is a critical part of their business plans (Virgin Pulse)
  • 62% of wellness program participants said it helped them lower their healthcare costs (HealthMine)
  • 38% of wellness program participants said it helped them take fewer sick days (HealthMine)
  • 33% of wellness program participants said it helped them be more productive at work (HealthMine)
  • 35% of consumers enrolled in wellness programs engage in them at least once per week (HealthMine)
  • 44% of employee enrolled in a wellness program have a chronic condition, yet only 14% said that their programs help manage those conditions (HealthMine)
  • 68% of employees would engage with their wellness program more if there were better incentives (HealthMine)
  • According to employees, the most appealing incentives for wellness program participation are health insurance premium reductions (77%), grocery vouchers (64%) and health savings accounts (62%) (United Healthcare)
  • 95% of employers offer wellness incentives to their employees; 74% offer incentives to family members (Optum)
  • 58% of 2017 benefit plans offer some type of wellness incentive, up from 50% in 2016 (CEB)
  • 27% of employers are now offering healthy lifestyle and wellness incentives (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 52% of employees in wellness programs reported that they do not receive incentives for fitness or weight loss programs (HealthMine)
  • 56% of employees believe they are overweight, and 45% believe they've gained weight at their present job (CareerBuilder)
  • 65% of companies offer personal health risk assessments, 71% offer second medical opinions, 54% offer biometric screenings, 48% offer llifestyle and health education (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 66% of companies will offer medical decision support and second opinion services in 2018 (NBGH)
  • 86% of employees ranked their colleagues as one of the top motivators to improving their overall health and well-being at work, 57% cited their direct manager (Welltok)
  • 64% of Millennials said their direct managers as a top influence to improve their overall health (Welltok)
  • Employees 55 or older cited direct managers (51%) and HR (40%) as top motivators in improving overall health (Welltok)
  • 60% of employees between 18 and 34 thought employers should be involved in financial health, less than half of those 45 and older agreed (Welltok)
  • 18% of employers currently offer financial planning programs (MetLife)
  • 84% of companies polled now include employee financial security in their wellness programs (NBGH)
  • 84% of companies say they now have financial security programs — such as access to debt management tools or student loan counseling (Fidelity)
  • 52% of employers said that they have implemented, or are considering implementing, a financial wellness program (Charles Schwab)
  • 44% of employers believe that a financial wellness program is becoming a “must-have” benefit in order for them to be competitive (Charles Schwab)
  • 59% of employers said the best way to structure financial wellness programs is to integrate the offering with the rest of the employee benefits package (Charles Schwab)
  • 37% of employers expressed concern over the potential cost of implementing a financial wellness program (Charles Schwab)
  • 71% of companies expect to offer tools and resources to support emergency savings, debt management and budgeting (Fidelity)
  • 25% of employees say their company’s health and wellness programs are actually making them healthier (One Medical)
  • 75% of employers offer wellness initiatives primarily to improve overall worker health and well-being (IFEBP)
  • 77% of organizations indicated their wellness program was somewhat or very effective in reducing healthcare costs (SHRM)
  • 88% of organizations rated their wellness initiatives as somewhat or very effective in improving employees’ health (SHRM)
  • 92% of workplaces offering wellness programs and tracking wellness ROI report their initiatives as very or somewhat successful (IFEBP)
  • 37% of employees who don’t participate in wellness programs did not find them personally relevant and 20% didn’t know they were available (Welltok)
  • 66% of employees say their wellness program does not include a medical test for nicotine use (HealthMine)
  • 48% of employees believe that colleagues who smoke should pay a penalty (HealthMine)
  • 57% of wellness programs do not include smoking cessation (HealthMine)
  • 11% of employees currently participate in a smoking cessation program through their wellness plan (HealthMine)
  • 19% of organizations have added a smoking surcharge to the cost of health care premiums (SHRM)
  • 80% of employees said they wouldn't be likely to complete a smoking cessation program without a financial incentive; 34% said their programs offer financial incentives (HealthMine)
  • 22% of survey participants currently have mindfulness programs and 21% are thinking about introducing one in 2017 (National Business Group on Health)
  • 41% of employee who don’t compare costs before scheduling services, 41% said it is because the “cost is covered by my health plan, so it doesn’t matter.” (HealthMine)
  • 72% of employees who choose their benefits through a private exchange say they are more likely to stay with their employer because of their benefits program (Liazon)
  • 83% of employees better understand what their health insurance and other benefits cover than they did prior to accessing a benefits marketplace (Liazon)
  • 85% of employees are more engaged in their health care decisions than they were prior to accessing a benefits marketplace (Liazon)
  • 85% of employees say they are more aware of the cost of health care than before they began using the private exchange marketplace (Liazon)
  • 77% of employees appreciate their benefits more than they did prior to accessing a benefits marketplace (Liazon)
  • 5% of employees say they would prefer their employer not use an online benefits exchange in the future (Liazon)
  • The number of employers using private exchanges for employee benefits rose 144% between June 2015 through the end of December 2016 (Employee Benefits Adviser)
  • 74% of companies have not considered providing subsidies to purchase health care insurance through a private exchange (SHRM)
  • If it means controlling costs without reducing benefits, 44% of employers would be inclined to switch to a private healthcare exchange (Liazon)
  • 57.8% of employers are “not confident” that private exchanges will provide a viable alternative to current methods of providing health coverage to active employees; no respondents stated they were “very confident” (Pacific Resources)
  • 64.4% of employers say “reduce company costs” would be the top reason to consider moving to an exchange (Pacific Resources)
  • 97% of employers said they were satisfied with their experience using a private marketplace (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 86% of employers say the marketplace has helped them control benefit costs (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 85% of employees using exchange marketplaces reported that they are “more aware” of the cost of medical care compared to their pre-exchange experience (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 82.6% of employers say they have a thorough or basic knowledge of the opportunities, challenges and decisions required to move to a private exchange (Pacific Resources)
  • 28.9% of employers have conducted an evaluation and decided not to move active employees to a private exchange (Pacific Resources)
  • 61% of employees rank their health as more important than their wealth or career (Mercer)
  • 47% of employees expect their workplace to become more focused on employee health in the next few years (Mercer)

Retirement Benefits Stats

  • The most popular retirement benefit among older Americans is the traditional pension, collected by 56% of households 65 and older (US Census)
  • 66% of “best in class” employers offer 401(k) plans (Adecco)
  • Employers' 401k contributions rose to 4.7% of workers' wages in 2016, up from 3.9% in 2015 (Wall Street Journal)
  • 92% of employers offer a 401(k), 402(b) or similar plan (SHRM)
  • An average of 66% of employees participated in 401(k) or similar plans (SHRM)
  • 70% of workers want personalized investment advice for 401(k) plans (Charles Schwab)
  • 15% of employers say they are satisfied with their workers’ current savings rate in programs such as 401k(s) (Aon Hewitt)
  • 60% of savers and 53% of nonsavers who have at one time contributed to a 401(k) say their 401(k) is their largest or only source of retirement savings (Charles Schwab)
  • 82% of millennials are investing in a retirement savings vehicle, more than Gen X (77%) and baby boomers (75%) (BoA Merrill Lynch)
  • 97% of auto-enrolled employees don’t opt out of retirement programs (BoA Merrill Lynch)
  • 53% of benefits executives ranked investment volatility as one of their top three current retirement plan risks, while 49% ranked retirement benefit costs as a top concern (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 31% of all employers, and 50% of large organizations, had their retirement plans audited by the federal government over the past two years (Willis Towers Watson)
  • One in four U.S. employees expect to work beyond age 70 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 72% of employers believe that many of their employees expect to work past age 65 or do not plan to retire (Transamerica)
  • 63% of working adults say they plan to work past retirement age, but on a part-time basis; 11% say they will work full time (Gallup)
  • Retirement plans, flexibility and time-off rank well ahead of amenities such as fitness centers, daycare and subsidized food (Oxford Economics
  • 69% of employers believe most of their employees could work to age 65 and not save enough to meet their retirement needs (Transamerica)
  • 27% of employers encourage workers to participate in succession planning, training and mentoring as they approach retirement (Transamerica)
  • Of 78% of employers that offer a retirement program, only 37% take steps to measure employee retirement readiness (AJG)
  • 33% of part-time employees have an employer-sponsored retirement plan compared to 69% of fulltime employees (Guardian Life)
  • 33% of part-timers “feel good” that they are saving for retirement; 41% of full-timers agree (Guardian Life)
  • 39% of employers offer pre-retirees flexible schedules, 31%  enable them to shift from full time to part time, 27% allow them to take on positions that are less stressful or demanding (Transamerica)
  • 71% of employers consider themselves to be “aging-friendly” by offering opportunities, work arrangements, and training and tools needed for employees of all ages (Transamerica)
  • 59% of employers cite negative perceptions of employees 50 years old and older, including higher healthcare costs (35%), higher wages and salaries (29%), and higher disability costs (15%) (Transamerica)
  • 45% of those who are not saving for retirement say they either have no money left over or are actually behind on bills at the end of each month; 23% of savers say the same (Charles Schwab)
  • 42% of those who are not saving for retirement say keeping up with monthly expenses is a significant source of stress; 20% of savers agree (Charles Schwab)
  • Among those actively saving for retirement, 66% say they’ve increased their contribution percentage in the past two years; 62% say they believe they are saving enough to retire when they want to (Charles Schwab)
  • 92% of employees participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan; 77% contribute enough to earn the full employer match (Financial Finesse)
  • 62% of employers surveyed see increased participation in retirement programs as the biggest measure of financial wellness program success (Charles Schwab)
  • 48% of plan sponsors have a formal metric system to track how prepared workers are for retirement (T. Rowe Price)
  • Employers with a metric tracking system had higher plan participation rates (63%) than those without (52%) (T. Rowe Price)
  • 51% of workers indicate that they don’t factor retirement into their long-term financial goals (Country Financial)
  • 90% of employers are concerned with their employees’ level of understanding about how much they need to save to achieve an adequate retirement savings (Aon Hewitt)
  • 82% of government employees say they are "completely" or "somewhat satisfied" with their retirement plan (Gallup
  • 35% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the retirement plan offered (Gallup)
  • 57% of nongovernment employees say they are "completely" or "somewhat satisfied" with their retirement plan (Gallup
  • Retirement plan participation has increased 19% in the past five years (Wells Fargo)
  • 62% of employees say they would be willing to pay more out of their paychecks for more generous retirement benefits (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 23% of employees believe they’ll have to work past age 70 to live comfortably in retirement; another 5% don’t think they’ll ever be able to retire (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 78% of millennials are on track to replace 80% of their pay in retirement, compared to 62% for Generation X and 50% for baby boomers (Wells Fargo)
  • 23% of employees under the age of 35 consider retirement on a weekly basis, compared to 27% of those 25-49 and 45% of those 50+ (OneAmerica)
  • 30% of young workers sign themselves up for 401(k) plans (over 50% of workers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and early 60s voluntarily take this step) (T. Rowe Price)
  • 18% of millennials are confident they will have a secure retirement (TransAmerica)
  • 60% of Millennials would forgo some of their pay if it meant a more secure retirement (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 30% of Millennials say they contribute more than 10% of pay to their retirement account (TransAmerica)
  • 46% of employers offer defined contribution retirement plans (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 98% of organizations offer defined contribution plans (WorldAtWork)
  • 91% of workers say it is important to know their retirement plan investments have been made with their best interests in consideration (LIMRA)
  • 77% of employees appreciate being able to take a loan from their retirement plan in case of an emergency (LIMRA)
  • 36% of employees would take a paycut for increased 401k matching (LendingTree)
  • 31.4% of Americans would like to see improvements to 401k matching (LendingTree)
  • 60% of workers 50 years old and older are worried that something may delay their retirement (Investopedia)
  • Only 10% of women are very confident they’ll be able to retire comfortable (Transamerica)
  • 83% of workers with a bachelor's degree have access to a retirement plan, compared with 62% of high school graduates and 43% of high school dropouts (ChangHwan Kim)
  • 67% of boomers say they are staying healthy so they can continue working (TransAmerica)
  • Among 20-something workers, 84% go along with being auto-enrolled in a 401(k) plan (T. Rowe Price)
  • 72% of plan sponsors are satisfied with their retirement advisors (Fidelity Investments)
  • 87% of companies use an advisor or plan consultant (Fidelity Investments)
  • 88% of companies said they have employees who put off retirement because they haven't saved enough (Fidelity Investments)
  • 43% of business owners who plan to increase contributions to their company’s 401(k) plan say they are doing so because their plan is now more important for attracting and retaining employees as a result of the ACA (Nationwide)
  • 86% of small business owners say America’s workers are facing a retirement readiness crisis (Nationwide)
  • 83% of millennials plan to work into retirement (Merrill Edge)
  • 58% of small business owners who offer retirement plans say they plan to increase contributions, and 19% of business owners who don’t currently offer 401(k) plans say they will offer them in the future (Nationwide)
  • 64% of non-profits are worried employees will delay retirement because they do not have enough money (TIAA)

PTO, Vacation and Time Off Stats

  • 56% of employees say additional PTO would make them more loyal to an organization (Fierce)
  • 60% of mid-size executives rank “benefits and paid time off” as having the best ROI (Namely)
  • 44% of small business employees believe PTO is important; 21% said they believe it drives their team’s performance (JustWorks)
  • 63% of employees would turn down a job offer that didn't include PTO (TSheets)
  • 88% of employees say employers should offer PTO (TSheets)
  • 90% of employees who plan vacations ahead of time are happy with their professional success; 87% are happy with their workplace (Project: Time Off)
  • 45% of employees say the ideal number of PTO days would be 20 or more; employees aged 18 to 29 say 16 to 20 days (Fierce)
  • 15% of employees would like to take unlimited vacation days each year, up 5% since 2012 (Fierce)
  • Among companies that offer unlimited vacation days, employees only take about 13 days off (Namely)
  • The average person in Europe works 19% less than the average person in the U.S. (EBN
  • 14% of the US workforce has access to employer-sponsored paid family leave (Boston Consulting Group)
  • 26% of organizations offered family leave above required federal FMLA, and 22% provided family leave above any state FMLA requirements (SHRM
  • 55% of people think others probably take paid leave on false premises (Pew)
  • 85% of Americans say sick workers should receive paid leave (Pew)
  • 82% of Americans say women should receive paid leave after giving birth or adopting (Pew)
  • 69% of Americans say men should receive paid paternity leave (Pew)
  • 51% of Americans say the federal government should mandate that employers cover paid family and medical leave, 48% say employers should be able to decide whether to offer that leave (Pew)
  • 114 million people in the U.S. still don’t have a single day of paid family leave (PL+US)
  • 32% of employers offer paid family leave programs (DMEC)
  • Among companies that don't offer paid family leave, 18% said they plan to include it in their benefits offerings in 2017, 33% hope to make it available in 2018 and 41% said that adding the benefits could take from 3-5 years (DMEC)
  • 30% of organizations are now providing more paid maternity leave than legally required, up from 26% in 2016 (SHRM)
  • 58% of private employers offer paid sick leave, up from 53% in 2016 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • The number of companies providing paid paternity declined 5% between 2010 and 2014 (PL+US)
  • Women who take paid leave are 93% more likely to be with the same company 9 to 12 months after a child's birth than women who take no leave (Boston Consulting Group)
  • 21% of organizations offer paid maternity leave (SHRM
  • 58% of organizations offer at least some replacement pay for women on maternity leave; up from 46% 11 years ago (SHRM)
  • 81% of employers allow employees to return to work gradually after the birth of a child or adoption, up from 73% in 2012 (SHRM)
  • Among employers offering any replacement pay, the percentage offering full pay has declined from 17% in 2005 to 10% in 2016 (SHRM)
  • 57% of working dads feel they don’t spend enough quality time with their children during the week, and 87% want to be more involved with the family’s daily routine (Care@Work)
  • 52% of working fathers feel their employers don’t do enough to support working parents (Care@Work)
  • 95% of working fathers feel they should have paid paternity leave (Care@Work)
  • 36% of men said they have no plans to use paternity leave benefits (Deloitte)
  • 57% of men with paternity leave benefits said that taking parental leave would show a lack of job commitment; 41% believed they would lose opportunities; 54% said colleagues would judge a man more harshly than a woman for taking the same amount of leave (Deloitte)
  • 67% of companies offer parental leave (Mercer)
  • 38% of US employers offer paid parental leave (WorldAtWork)
  • 78% of the employers offering paid parental leave make it available to all workers (WorldAtWork)
  • 53% of employers mandate that workers take paid parental leave in the first year of parenthood (WorldAtWork)
  • 64% of employers worldwide provide maternity leave for only the birth mother (Mercer)
  • 24% of employers provide parental leave to the primary caregiver regardless of gender (Mercer)
  • 37% of employers offer paid maternity leave; 24% offer paid paternity leave; 19% offer paid leave for adoption (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 9% of employers provide paid leave to attend a child's activities, 21% offer unpaid leave (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 83% of employees say that more time off would increase their commitment at work (Ultimate Software)
  • 41% of US employees spend half of their days off working or thinking about work (Adobe)
  • 91% of governmental workers say they are satisfied with their vacation time (Gallup
  • 74% of nongovernmental workers say they are satisfied with their vacation time (Gallup)
  • 49% of households set aside time to plan vacations; these are 51% of them use all their vacation time (Project: Time Off
  • 56% of Americans say they haven't taken a vacation in the last 12 months, compared to 52% who reported going without a vacation for a year in 2014 (Allianz
  • 15% of Americans said they haven't been on vacation in 7 to 12 months and 10% said it has been 4 to 6 months, with 16% saying they have been on vacation within the last 3 months (Allianz
  • 99% of companies provide some form of paid vacation leave to their full-time employees (SHRM
  • 86% of organizations provide between 6 and 20 vacation days to full-time employees on average, with 40% providing 11 to 15 days (SHRM
  • 23% of Americans have no paid holidays (CEPR
  • 98% of organizations offer paid holidays (SHRM
  • 75% of Americans favor proposals that would require employers to provide seven days of sick leave and two weeks of paid vacation (Gallup)
  • 75% of Americans favor proposals that would require employers to provide seven days of sick leave and two weeks of paid vacation (Gallup)
  • 73% of organizations offer six to 10 days of paid holidays to their full-time employees per year (SHRM
  • 72% of organizations offered six to 10 days of paid holidays to part-time employees (SHRM
  • 95% of organizations provide some form of paid sick leave to employees (SHRM)
  • 85% of all employees say sick leave is still important (TSheets)
  • 35% of workers call in “sick” just to take a mental health day (American Express)
  • 80% of all employers offer paid vacation to full-time W2 based employees, while just 13% offer these benefits to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 43 million private sector workers have no sick days (National Partnership for Women & Families
  • 39% of employees don’t believe their bosses encourage them to take allotted vacation days (Randstad) 
  • 40% of workers who received paid vacation as a benefit did not use all of their available days in 2014 (Alamo
  • 55% of employees left vacation days on the table in 2015 (Project: Time Off)
  • Americans used 73.8% of earned vacation time (16.2 days used of 21.9 days earned) in 2015 (Project: Time Off)
  • Americans lost 222 million vacation days (due to rollover, etc.) in 2015, resulting in $61.4 billion in forfeited benefits and free work for employers (Project: Time Off)
  • 26% of employees feel like they can’t turn off their job outside of work hours or even while on vacation (Cornerstone
  • 700 million vacation days went unused in 2016 (Namely)
  • 19% of employees left five days or more of paid vacation unused last year (Alamo)
  • 70% of employees did not use all their PTO last year, and 26% of them had 10 or more unused PTO days (TSheets)
  • 70% of employees say they didn’t use all their PTO last year (Namely)
  • Low performers in the office take 14 days of vacation, compared with 19 days on average for high performers (Namely)
  • Employees at companies with unlimited PTO policies take just 13 days a year, compared with 15 days for those with traditional paid time off plans (Namely)
  • 38% of employees believe taking fewer vacations makes them look better in the eyes of their boss (Randstad) 
  • 49% of employees feel stressed after they return from vacation (Randstad)
  • 62% of employees are either more stressed or have the same level of stress upon returning from vacation (Fierce)
  • 38% of employees unsatisfied with work feel more stressed returning from vacation; just 14% of those very satisfied feel the same (Fierce)
  • 46% of employees say they worry about work while on vacation (Randstad) 
  • 34% of millennials work every day of their vacations (Alamo
  • 95% of senior business leaders recognize the importance of using time off (US Travel Association
  • 36% of employees have had to cancel vacation plans due to work (Randstad)
  • 65% of employees say they hear nothing, mixed messages, or discouraging message about taking time off (Project: Time Off)
  • 46% of employees say they receive no encouragement from managers or companies to take time off (Project: Time Off)
  • 31% of employees put pressure on themselves to work during vacation; 17% report pressure from bosses (Project: Time Off)
  • 40% of both full- and part-time workers plan to work during their vacation or at least check in with the office (University of Chicago)
  • 45% of managers put pressure on themselves to check in with the office during time off, 25% of them feel like their boss expects them to (Project: Time Off)
  • 32% of managers never talk about the importance of taking time off (Project: Time Off)
  • 25% of employees are unsure or agree that their employer wants them to work on vacation (Project: Time Off)
  • 80% of employees would take more time off if encouraged by their boss (Project: Time Off)
  • Over 50% of employees believe their managers support and encourage them to take time off; 40% of employees believe the same of their coworkers (Fierce)
  • 80% of employees feel more comfortable taking time off if a manager encouraged them (Namely)
  • 58% of employees sense a lack of time off support from their boss; 53% sense a lack of support from colleagues (Project: Time Off)
  • 24% of employees say their manager is most influential in taking time off; family was cited by 23% (Project: Time Off)
  • 57% of dissatisfied employees say no one encourages them or supports them taking PTO; just 18% of those very satisfied feel the same (Fierce)
  • 45% of individuals in households making $50,000 or less a year say no one encourages them to take vacation, while less than 30% of those making $100,000 or more say the same (Fierce)
  • 41% of employees do not plan to use all their paid time off this year (US Travel Association
  • 89% of employees said PTO influenced their employer choice and job satisfaction (TriNet)
  • 33% of employees feel they don't have enough vacation time (Accountemps)
  • 63% of organizations say they’ve moved to PTO plan policies, up from 50% in 2013 and 38% in 2010 (Mercer)
  • 44% of small business employees said they believe PTO is important; 21% said they believe it drives their team’s performance (JustWorks)
  • 56% of workers are satisfied with the amount of vacation they receive (Gallup)
  • 25% of workers plan to take no vacation time in 2017 (Monster.com)
  • 52% of Americans who get vacation days say they plan to leave some of their paid time off in the bank (Bankrate)
  • 31.6% of employees would give up a portion of their salary for more PTO days (LendingTree)
  • 1 in 3 workers would like more PTO (TSheets)
  • 35.7% of Millennial employees would give up over $1000 for five extra PTO days (LendingTree)
  • 50% of small business employees would accept a lower-paying job for more PTO (JustWorks)
  • 62% of employees would forego a raise for more flexibility in their work schedules and approximately 20% preferred PTO to a raise (TSheets)
  • 64% of American workers get vacation days (Bankrate)
  • 28% of millennials and 25% of boomers said they weren't using up their vacation days because they had too much work to do (Bankrate)
  • 52% of Boomers are comfortable being accessible outside of normal business hours (compared to 48% of other generations) (Monster.com)
  • 22% of workers underreport their work hours (Kimble Applications)
  • Baby boomers were twice as likely (26%) to say they need four weeks or more off work than millennials (13%) (TriNet)
  • 41% of Americans didn't take a single vacation day in 2015 (Skift
  • 33% of employees say they cannot afford to use their PTO (US Travel Association)
  • 46% of employees respond to emails while taking PTO; 29% return calls from work (US Travel Association
  • 36% of employees admit they’ve responded to work emails after 10pm, 36% while on vacation, 15% while on dates, and 19% after 3am (American Express)
  • 50% of employees say they work on their own time to meet the demands of their job (Rand Corp)
  • 50% of employees check in with the office while on vacation, with 13% checking in daily (Fierce)
  • 61% of Americans work while they’re on vacation despite repeated complaints from members of their family; one-in-four are contacted by a colleague about a work-related matter while taking time off, while one-in-five have been contacted by their boss (Glassdoor
  • 37% of senior business leaders reported unplugging entirely from work during PTO , compared to 74% of employees (US Travel Association
  • Americans who used all of their paid vacation were more likely to unplug while on their trips (54% vs. 37%) with 40% stating they are more productive when they return to work (Alamo
  • Employees only use 51% of their eligible paid vacation time and paid time off (Glassdoor
  • 40% of employees feel they can't justify taking time off due to workload, 13% are intimidated by work piling up while they're gone (Oxford Economics
  • The biggest reasons why employees don’t use all their vacation time: returning to a mountain of work (37%), no one else can do the job (30%), the higher you rise in a company the harder it is to take time off (28%), and wanting to show complete dedication to the company and job (22%) (Project: Time Off)
  • 41% of employees say they have skipped vacations (or taken fewer days off) out of fear that their work would pile up while gone (Accountemps)
  • 41% of employees check in with the office at least once or twice a week while on vacation (Accountemps)
  • 36% of employees ages 18-34 check in with the office at least once or twice a day while on vacation (Accountemps)
  • 35% of employees took less or no days off because they worried about the effect it would have on co-workers (Accountemps)
  • 40% of women said they don't have enough vacation time, compared to 26% of men (Accountemps)
  • 56% of employees say their vacation allotment is just right, 33% say it’s not enough, 11% say they have too much (Accountemps)
  • 57% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the amount of vacation time they receive (Gallup)
  • 38% of employees say their company allows them time off to follow their passions (ReportLinker)
  • 28% of employers allow employees to receive special consideration after a career break for personal/family responsibilities (up from from 21% in 2012) (SHRM)
  • 81% of employers allow employees to take time off during the workday to attend to important family or personal needs without loss of pay, down from 87% in 2012) (SHRM)
  • 40% of employers will offer "Summer Fridays" in 2017 (Gartner)
  • Properly administering and managing lost time is a top pursuit for 62% of employers (AJG)

Flexible Working Stats

  • 43% of U.S. employees now say they work remotely in some capacity (Gallup)
  • Telecommuting has increased 159% since 2000 (Quartz)
  • 47% of employees say their employer offers flexible hours (ReportLinker)
  • 37% of U.S. workers say they have telecommuted (Gallup)
  • 60% of organizations offer some form of telecommuting (SHRM
  • 11% of employees say their workplace offers telecommuting; 70% of those say they can telecommute as often as they like  (ReportLinker)
  • 40% of employers allow employees to work some of their paid hours at home on a regular basis, up from 33% in 2012 (SHRM)
  • 56% of employers offer the option to use flexible work arrangements (SHRM)
  • The percentage of at-home workers grew from 19% to 22% between 2003 and 2016 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 7% of U.S. employers allow employees to telecommute (FlexJobs)
  • 40% of employers offer “softer” benefits like flexible schedules (Adecco)
  • 78% of employees say they are required to be present in their workplace during working hours (Rand Corp)
  • 47% of employers offer flexible workhours or compressed workweeks (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 71% of senior staff agrees that telecommuting allows them to get more work done, compared to 51% of middle or staff level employees (CompTIA)
  • 9% of employers offer job sharing (where two or more part-time workers share one full-time job) (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 3.9 million employees were telecommuting by 2015, up from 1.8 million in 2005 (FlexJobs)
  • Telecommuting has grown 159% since 2000 (FlexJobs)
  • 11% of employers offer telecommute benefits (ReportLinker)
  • 43% of employees worked remotely at least some of the time in 2016 (Gallup)
  • 31% of employees spend 80% or more of their time working remotely (Gallup)
  • 79% of employees with flexibility indicated that they were more happy at work (IBM)
  • Benefits that employees surveyed say demonstrate empathy from the company include: Flexible work hours (96%), Paid maternity leave (96%), Medical/health insurance (95%) (Businessolver)
  • 30% of employees who work from home are engaged (Gallup)
  • 76% of advertising and marketing executives say their company offers some form of alternative work arrangement (The Creative Group)
  • 61% of employees say their direct manager is supportive of flexible work arrangements (Mercer)
  • 61% of employees think the traditional 9-to-5 work schedule is outdated (CareerBuilder)
  • 22% of Millennials prefer to go into work every day (DeVry University)
  • Employees who spend less than 20% of their time working remotely are the most satisfied (Gallup)
  • Among mothers who are currently employed either full or part time, 40% say they would prefer to work outside the home, and 54% would prefer to stay home (Gallup)
  • 98% of working parents believe that having a job with flexibility would have a positive impact on their overall quality of life (FlexJobs)
  • 53% of stay-at-home mothers say having flexibility in their hours or work schedule is a "major factor" in their ability to take a job (Gallup)
  • 73% of working adults agree that flexibility is one of the most important factors they consider when looking for a new job (Mom Corps
  • 47% of working adults say asking for flexible work options would hurt their chances of job advancement (Mom Corps
  • 39% of working adults have considered leaving or have left a job because it wasn't flexible enough (Mom Corps
  • 41.5% of employees would like to see flexible hours introduced to their work benefits (LendingTree)
  • Perks Millennials prefer from employers: flexible schedules (70%), good benefits (60%) (NSHSS)
  • 58% of Americans believe remote workers are just as productive as those who work in a business office (Gallup)
  • 50% of employees believe working remotely or part-time can adversely impact promotional opportunities (Mercer)
  • Fully remote workers are 29% less likely to strongly agree that they have reviewed their greatest successes with their manager in the past six months (Gallup)
  • Fully remote workers are 30% less likely to strongly agree that they have talked with their manager about steps to reach their goals in the past six months (Gallup)
  • 58% of employed Americans are "completely satisfied" with the flexibility of their hours (Gallup)
  • 42% of small business employees would take a lower-paying job if it offered a greater degree of workplace flexibility (JustWorks)
  • 70% of small-business employees say flexible work schedules are very important (JustWorks)
  • 84% of Millennials report at least some degree of flexible working, with 39% saying they were a part of highly flexible environments (Deloitte)
  • 68% of small business employees said flexible hours positively affected their teams (JustWorks)
  • 75% of Millennials would prefer to work from home or other locations where they feel they could be most productive. However, only 43% currently are allowed to do this (Deloitte
  • 66% of employees consider the office the most productive place to get work done; 36% say the office is the most "inspiring place" to work (Staples)
  • 45% of telecommuters say they love their jobs, compared to 38% of mobile workers and 24% of employees who worked every day in their offices (Leadership IQ)
  • Top five reasons employees say they like working for small businesses: flexible scheduling (27%), seeing the fruits of their labor (23%), feeling their input matters (17%), being rewarded for hard work (14%) and getting noticed by people who matter (9%) (Aflac)
  • 46% of female employees say flextime is the most important benefit a company can offer its workers (Gallup)
  • 44% of employees indicated flexible work arrangements as the No. 1 benefit they’d love to have at work (Virgin Pulse
  • 30% of employees said they would take a 10% or 20% cut in pay in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 24% of employees are willing to forfeit vacation time in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 18% of employees would give up employer-matched retirement contributions in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 10% of employees want a situation where they do not come into the office at all, and 35% do not want any telecommuting days at all (CompTIA
  • 63% of Millennials say they're more likely to join a company that offers the option to telecommute (along with 57% of GenX, 41% of Boomers) (CompTIA
  • 44% of employees view companies that don't offer a telecommuting option as old-fashioned (CompTIA
  • 96% of employees reported having some type of flexibility (Flex+Strategy)
  • 97% of employees say a job with flexibility would have a positive impact on their overall quality of life (Flexjobs)
  • 19% of both Gen Z and Millennials say flexibility is their most important workplace benefit (Future Workplace)
  • Reasons why employees say they want flexible work options: Work-life balance (81%), Family (56%), Time savings (56%), Commute stress (48%) (Flexjobs)
  • Policies that would reduce voluntary turnover: Flexible schedules (51%), Increased recognition (awards, cash prizes, company trips) (50%), Acting on employee feedback (48%) (CareerBuilder
  • More than one-third of employees would change companies for an employer that embraces flexible work (Unify
  • 81% of Millennials think they should be allowed to make their own hours at work versus 69% of Boomers (MTV
  • The most common adaptions to accommodate millennials in the U.S. are making work hours more flexible (21%), allowing work from home (17%), increasing training (16%), implementing new mentoring programs (13%), and altering corporate culture (10%) (Duke/CFO
  • 73.5% of associations offer employees flexible work schedules (ASAE)
  • 24% of workers did either some or all of their work at home in 2015 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 77% of millennials say flexible work hours would make the workplace more productive for people their age (Bentley University
  • 65% of employees think a flexible and remote work schedule would increase their productivity (Cornerstone
  • 17% of employers offer seasonal scheduling (SHRM)
  • 40% of job candidates cite schedule flexibility as one of three top career considerations (Manpower Group)
  • 45% of U.S. job candidates want work flexibility (Manpower Group)
  • 30% of Millennials view the ability to work remotely as an important factor in selecting a workplace (Impraise)
  • 68% of recent grads said the ability to work remotely at least some of the time would affect their likelihood to accept a position (After College
  • 74% of millennials expect flexible schedules in the workplace (Deep Focus)
  • Only 19% of employees are allowed to work remotely by their employers (Cornerstone)
  • 43% of millennials would switch jobs for greater flexibility (Unify)
  • 74% of Millennials want flexible work schedules (Intelligence Group)
  • 50% of Millennials say flexible work hours and the freedom to work from any location would improve their work/life balance (RingCentral
  • 54% of employed mothers would prefer to stay home; 40% would prefer to work outside the home (Gallup)
  • 53% of stay-at-home mothers say flexible hours or work schedules are a "major factor" in their ability to take a job (Gallup)
  • 84% of working parents cited work flexibility as the most important factor when looking for a job (FlexJobs)
  • Work/life balance (80%) and salary (75%) are the second and third top considerations for working parents when looking for a job (FlexJobs)
  • 60% of women and 48% of men rate greater work-life balance and better personal well-being as a "very important" attribute in a new job (Gallup)
  • 44% of female employees would leave their current job for one that allowed them to work off-site part time (Gallup)
  • 51% of employees saying they are interested in contract or freelance work for more flexible hours (MetLife)
  • Job searches for flexible work are up 32% (Hiring Lab)
  • 38% of workers said their employers ensured that they had a suitable workspace at home (Bupa UK)
  • 51% of people who work from home said they suffer from work-related injuries (Bupa UK)
  • 78% of new parents said they considered not returning to their current employer after having their first child (Bright Horizons)

Benefits Management Stats

  • 32% of organizations increased their overall benefits offerings in the last 12 months (SHRM)
  • 6% of organizations decreased benefits during the last 12 months (SHRM)
  • Large organizations (12%) are three times more likely than midsize organizations (4%) to have decreased overall benefits offerings in the past 12 months (SHRM)
  • The cost of employee benefits as part of compensation has gone up 24% between 2001 and 2015 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 59% of employers are overwhelmed by the task of managing benefits (Guardian Life)
  • 70% of employers say keeping up with changing compliance laws is difficult (Guardian Life)
  • 65% of benefits professionals say they spend less than a year developing their annual benefit plan changes (HUB)
  • 53% of HR executives are satisfied or very satisfied (17%) with their current core benefits enrollment technology (Employee Benefits News)
  • 24.5% of employers use technology for non-payroll HR functions, such as education, benefits and communication (LIMRA)
  • 59% of employers are now using a technology platform for insurance benefit enrollment, administration, or both (LIMRA)
  • 77% of employers want a technology system that can manage all of their benefits on the same platform (LIMRA)
  • 53% of benefits professionals say they need a better technology solution to reduce their workload but 36% report that they struggle the most to convince their CEOs/CFOs to make technology investments (HUB)
  • 10% of companies are looking to adopt enrollment technology; 25% want to switch to a new benefits platform (LIMRA)
  • 60% of respondents considered their HR technology to be very effective for payroll, retirement and benefits administration (Paychex)
  • 73% of employees prefer to talk live with someone about their benefits rather than use an automated system (Health Advocate)
  • 41% of employees are concerned about infrequent communication about benefits (Health Advocate)
  • 38% of companies (and 53% of large orgs) count on the help of vendors to communicate benefits (AJG)
  • 60% of employees prefer to receive information about company benefits electronically (Jellyvision)
  • 20% of employees say they don’t always keep up with benefits correspondence (Jellyvision)
  • 73% of employees prefer a phone conversation as their No. 1 communication preference to discuss healthcare cost and administrative information (Health Advocate)
  • 19% of employers say their employees have a high level of understanding their benefits (IFEBP)
  • 80% of organizations report low benefits knowledge due to participants not opening/reading materials, almost half don't understand the materials, and 31% say participants do not perceive value in their benefits (IFEBP)
  • Gen Y employees are more than twice as likely (20%) than Baby Boomers (9%) to be confused about the benefits they are entitled to (Barclays)
  • 34% of employees say they pay attention to all of the materials they receive about their company benefits (Jellyvision)
  • 14% of HR professionals say employees are "very knowledgeable" about employer-sponsored benefits; 69% say employees are "somewhat knowledgeable" (SHRM)
  • 21% of employees often regret their benefit choices (Jellyvision)
  • 98% of employees would rather choose their benefits than have their employer choose for them (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 95% of employees prefer to select their own benefits rather than have their employers choose for them (Liazon)
  • 88% of employees like the idea of having choices to customize their benefit packages (Sun Life)

  • 74% of employees say that having benefits customized to meet their needs is important when considering taking a new job (MetLife)
  • 69% of employees do not trust their employer to know what benefits are right for them (Sun Life)

  • 92% of employees are confident in their benefits decisions (Sun Life)

  • 65% of organizations say educating employees about their benefits is a high priority (IFEBP)

  • Nearly two in five organizations have budgets specifically devoted to benefits communication and 25% are planning to increase those budgets in 2016 (IFEBP)
  • 26% of employers are interested in outsourcing employee benefits communications services to a third party (Aflac)
  • Platforms employers are using to communicate about benefits: (IFEBP)
    • Educational materials printed and mailed to homes—89%
    • Email—73%
    • Printed and distributed on site—69%
    • Internal websites—66%
    • External websites—58%
  • 86% of employers using independent contractors do so for cost-saving purposes such as taxes and benefits (Burson Marsteller)

  • 58% of employers say full-time hires are better for their company because they provide more value over the long-term despite having to pay more up-front on taxes and benefits (Burson Marsteller)
  • 66% of employers feel they should not be responsible for providing benefits to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 50% of employers don’t think they should be responsible for providing training or education to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 47% of employers worry about regulatory compliance (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 52% of HR departments cite controlling benefit costs remains the highest priority; 37% say improving employee engagement, 33% say creating a strong workplace culture (AJG)
  • 81% of benefits professionals selected managing costs as one of their three primary benefits priorities; 50% list helping workers make better benefits decisions (HUB)
  • Four out of five companies say one of their goals is to manage health benefits costs better; 40% do not plan to implement any new cost management programs in the next 12 to 18 months and 50% believe that they’ve done all they can reasonably do to manage costs (HUB)
  • 77% of organizations saw increases in their costs after ACA (SHRM)
  • 85% of employers say the ACA would have an impact on their workplace in the next 12 months (Littler)
  • Top concerns of HR and finance execs: employee wellness and productivity (83%), cost management (76%), ACA compliance (58%) (HUB)
  • 64% of HR and finance execs say that ACA compliance would cause them to struggle to stay in business (HUB)
  • 67% of employers expect the Affordable Care Act to be partially repealed, 17% predict total repeal, 9% predict no action (LIMRA)
  • 48% of employers say the ACA’s total repeal would have little or no effect on their benefits package (LIMRA)
  • 36% of employers understand health care reform legislation extremely or very well (Aflac)
  • 60% of employees said the top issues concerning them are increasing out-of-pocket medical expenses or the increasing cost of major medical or health insurance over maintaining their health benefits or the possibility of their employer eliminating spouse coverage (Aflac)
  • 46% of employers are outsourcing or looking to outsource reporting and other regulatory requirements of the Affordable Care Act, 40% for American with Disabilities Act directives and 39% for Family Medical Leave mandates (Prudential)
  • 97% of finance executives still have "significant concerns" with benefits costs (HUB)
  • 65% of HR and finance execs believe they are doing all they can to rein in rising benefits costs (Hub International)
  • 74% of employers claim cost is an important consideration in making benefits decisions (MetLife)
  • 32% of finance executives expect HR to go over budget (Hub International)
  • 5% of large employers reported that they intend to reduce the number of full-time employees that they intend to hire because of the cost of providing health care benefits (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 31.6% of total employee compensation costs were accounted for by benefits (SHRM)
  • 79% of employees see a growing need for voluntary insurance today compared to last year (Aflac)
  • 87% of companies offer voluntary benefits (Employee Benefit News)
  • 50% of companies agree that "voluntary benefits are a significant part of our company’s benefits strategy" (MetLife
  • 87% of employees offered voluntary benefits felt they mattered to their employers (BenefitsPro)
  • 78% of employers view voluntary benefits as being extremely effective or very effective in supporting employee financial well-being (Xerox)
  • 39% of employees don’t know what voluntary benefits are (Sun Life)
  • 30% of employees are familiar with voluntary benefits (Sun Life)
  • 79% of employees say voluntary benefits sound great, but they aren’t completely convinced to pay for them (Sun Life)
  • 83% of workers with healthcare coverage would enroll in a voluntary benefits program without expecting their employer to pay for it (BenefitsPro)
  • 79% of employees see voluntary benefits as necessary (AFLAC)
  • 66% of employer currently add choice in benefit types by offering voluntary benefits, with another 20% planning to or considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • Percentage of employees who report their employers offer types of voluntary insurance: Life insurance (54%), disability insurance (38%), health savings account (36%), accident insurance (24%), critical illness insurance (15%), and hospital indemnity insurance (9%) (Securian)
  • 12% of employees report being offered none of those benefits (Securian)
  • 75% of employees who have access to life insurance through their employer are enrolled (Securian)
  • 77% of organizations review their benefits programs annually, and 11% review them even more frequently (SHRM)
  • 38% of employees are not very confident they made the right benefits decisions at annual enrollment (MetLife
  • 24% of employers currently create a virtual shopping experience at the time of enrollment, with another 26% planning to or considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 55% of employers currently provide decision-support tools for health navigation, with another 26% considering (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 54% of employees claim they need more help understanding how their benefits work, and how those benefits can help meet their needs (MetLife
  • 43% of millennials and 30% of non-millennials are not reading most of their employee benefits handbooks; 11% of millennials haven’t even opened their handbooks (GuideSpark)
  • 23% of millennials and 36% of non-millennials don't know where their benefit handbooks are anymore (GuideSpark)
  • 45% of employees strongly agree their companies’ benefit communications helped them to understand how they would pay for specific services and effectively educated them on their benefit options (MetLife)
  • 88% of HR managers cite cost control as a very important benefits objective, 80% say optimizing benefits plans to reduce costs is a most important strategy (MetLife
  • 16% of employers said they are working directly with providers to design health plans (Healthcare Trends Institute)New Call-to-action

Employee Perks and Other Miscellaneous Benefits Stats

  • 78% of employees want a greater variety of benefits to choose from (MetLife)
  • 80% of employees would value benefits customized to individual circumstances and age (MetLife
  • 21% of Millennials define a good work environment as a place that offers incentives and perks (Staples)
  • US businesses spend $90 billion a year on non-cash incentives, up 17% from 2013 (Incentive Federation)
  • 84% of U.S. businesses use some form of non-cash incentive awards, which includes incentive travel, merchandise, gift cards, and award points (Incentive Federation)
  • 88% of employees agree it’s important that employers reward employees for great work (AttaCain)
  • 41% of employees say their employer effectively rewards employees for great work (AttaCain)
  • 90% of employees who work in places with effective rewards programs agreed with the statement “My work makes a difference” (AttaCain)
  • 46% of Millenials say more office perks would improve their happiness (Staples)
  • 64% of millennials care more about perks and benefits, compared to 51% of baby boomers and 54% of Gen X (LinkedIn)
  • Employees aged 18-34 (89%) and 35-44 (84%) prefer benefits or perks to pay raises, compared to those aged 45-54 (70%) and 55-64 (66%) (Glassdoor)
  • 46% of employees would consider a job that matched their current salary or even paid less (ADP)
  • 90% of millennials would choose to stay in a job for the next 10 years if they knew they'd get annual raises and upward career mobility (Qualtrics)
  • 65% of Generation Y employees said that they would value financial education or guidance in the workplace, but 83% confirmed that this was not available to them (Barclays)
  • 44% of Millennials are relying on their employers to ensure their financial security (MetLife)
  • 47% of US employers include financial well-being in their overall workforce well-being strategy; 80% expect to include it by 2018 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 64% of companies do not feature or market promotion opportunities as a key benefit to attract new employees (WorldatWork)
  • 48% of organizations offer community volunteer programs (SHRM
  • 91% of employers offer an employee assistance program (IFEBP)
  • 5% of employees say they use their company’s EAP (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 72% of CFOs say their company covers some or all of the cost for staff to obtain professional certifications; 76% said their organization helps in maintaining credentials once earned (Robert Half)
  • 88% of organizations offered professional membership benefits in 2016 (SHRM)
  • 29% of CFOs say their organization offers no financial support for employees' continuing education (Robert Half)
  • 41% of employers are sending current workers back to school to get an advanced degree; 14% fully funding the degree, and 22% funding it partially (CareerBuilder)
  • 61% of employers offer tuition reimbursement (SHRM)
  • 40.5% of associations offer employees tuition assistance (ASAE)
  • 56% of organizations offer undergraduate educational assistance (SHRM)
  • 30% are "very satisfied" with their work-life benefits, and about 1 in 10 employees aren't satisfied at all (Care.com)
  • 89% of working parents want family care benefits; 81% say their employers don't offer any (Care.com)
  • 22% of organizations allow employees to bring their children to work in a child care emergency (SHRM)
  • 41% of working parents say the lack of family assistance-related benefits has hurt their work performance (Care.com)
  • Most desired employee perks: Half-day Fridays (40%), On-site gym (20%), casual dress (18%) (CareerBuilder
  • 22% of employers offer a casual dress code; 40% only relax dress codes on Fridays (IFEBP)
  • 40% of employers are sending employees back to school to get an advanced degree (23% fund it partially, 12% fully funding) (CareerBuilder
  • 68% of employers offer training programs; 71% offer soft skills and 72% offer hard skills (CareerBuilder)
  • 77% of U.S. midsized employers provide employee training programs; 40% of employees participate in them (ADP)
  • 51% of employers plan to provide more online, competency-based learning opportunities in 2017 (CareerBuilder)
  • 39% of employees say their employer offers career development services (ReportLinker)
  • 57% of HR pros feel challenged to create engaging employee experiences in learning (SilkRoad)
  • Among companies with training programs, 11% say those budgets have been reduced over the past year; 39% report an increase, and 50% remained the same (SHRM)
  • 80% of 2016 grads expect their first employer to provide formal training (Accenture)
  • 54% of 2014 & 2015 grads received formal training from their first employer (Accenture)
  • 22% of employees believe their employers are "very effective" in providing easy access to training and development (Saba Software)
  • 22% of employees say their employers provide training and development that helps in career advancement (Saba Software)
  • 45% of workers believe that company-provided development programs are not applicable to their day-to-day job needs (Spherion)
  • 14% of employees would grade their company an “A” for the availability of training resources (Spherion)
  • 45% of companies say they have increased their investment in training and development programs during the last two years (Spherion)
  • 55% of employees say they think they could advance professionally if they were offered greater training opportunities (American Staffing Association)
  • 68% of workers say training and development is the most important workplace policy, followed by working hours flexibility (74%), promotion of health at work (72%) (EdenRed)
  • Executives cite a high level of education or institutional training as the most important employee attribute, only 23% say they offer development and training as a benefit (Oxford Economics
  • 84% of organizations offer their staff some form of professional development opportunities (SHRM
  • 63% of Millennials look for jobs at learning organizations where they will have access to training, workshops, and company-funded postgraduate schooling (Impraise)
  • 91% of organizations offer paid professional memberships (SHRM
  • 42% of organizations offer cross-training to develop skills not directly related to employees’ current jobs (SHRM
  • 46% of employees say their company's training courses/methods make them less likely to leave (CompTIA
  • 35% of employees are concerned about falling behind in acquiring the new skills required to succeed in more advanced future positions (Spherion)
  • Companies that pay for a spouse’s travel has fallen 7% in 2013 to just 2% (SHRM)
  • 59% of companies reimburse employees for internet access on business travel (SHRM)
  • 87% of companies will reimburse traveling employees for taxis or parking; 80% allow for mileage reimbursement for the use of a personal car to travel to and from the airport (SHRM)
  • 66% of employers allow employees to keep hotel points, down from 69% in 2013; 65% allow employees to keep frequent flyer miles, down from 69% in 2013 (SHRM)
  • 76% of companies offer a travel per diem or meal reimbursement, up from 70% in 2013; 9% cover minibar purchases (SHRM)
  • 4% of companies cover pay per view purchases for traveling employees (SHRM)
  • 83% of Millennials ranked travel rewards as the number one reward that they would want most from an employer (Achievers
  • Feeling encouraged by a supervisor to take breaks increases by nearly 100% people’s likelihood to stay with any given company, and also doubles their sense of health and well-being (The Energy Project
  • 33% of Millennials expect their employer to help repay existing student loans (EdAssist)
  • 4% of organizations offer student loan repayment benefits in 2016, a 1% rise since 2015 (SHRM)
  • 4% of employers offer student loan debt repayment (WorldAtWork)
  • 86% of employees said they’d stay with a company for at least five years if their employer helped pay down their student loans (American Student Assistance)
  • 50% of Millennials expect financial support in paying for further education (EdAssist)
  • 17% of organizations offer same-sex domestic partner benefits (excluding health care) (SHRM
  • 95% of employers offer coverage to opposite-sex partners and 85% offer it to same-sex partners (SHRM)
  • 86% of employers provide benefits to same-sex spouses, up from 79% in 2014 (IFEBP)
  • 31% of employers provide benefits to same-sex partners in civil unions, down from 51% in 2014 (IFEBP)
  • 48% of employers provide benefits to same-sex domestic partners, down from 59% in 2014 (IFEBP)
  • 75% of employers offer contraceptive coverage, down from 82% in 2013 (SHRM)
  • 24% of employers offer in-vitro fertilization coverage (SHRM)
  • 24% of employers w/ 500+ employees offer fertility services as part of their benefits; 19% cover IVF treatments, 12% cover fertility medications and 9% cover non-IVF fertility treatments (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 4% of employers with fewer than 50 employees offer fertility services (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 22% of employers offer resource and referral services for child care (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 14% of employers offer resource and referral services for adopted children (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 17% of employers offer take Your Child to Work Day (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 16% of employers offer financial assistance for adoption (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 10% of employers offer emergency/sick child care (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 8% of employers offer on-site or near-site child care (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 3% of employers offer child-care subsidies (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 1% of employers offer special needs child care (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 1% of companies allow babies at work (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 42% of companies offer onsite lactation rooms (SHRM)
  • 1% of companies offer breast milk shipping for new mothers who travel (International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans)
  • 49% of new U.S. parents would be willing to work for less than their current salary for an organization that offers more family-friendly perks (Bright Horizons)
  • 75% of employers believe that caregiving benefits will become more important to their companies over the next five years (SHRM)
  • 4% of benefits managers say caregiving benefits are within their top 10 priorities for employee health and benefit issues; 12% say it’s within their top five priorities (NEBGH)
  • Benefits each generation is most interested in: employee discount programs (34% of Boomers), paid parental leave (34% of Gen X), financial wellness programs (46% of millennials) (ADP)
  • 13% of organizations offer employer-sponsored personal shopping discounts (SHRM) 
  • 30% of organizations offer discount ticket service (SHRM) 
  • 79% of Millennials think they should be allowed to wear jeans to work (at least sometimes) versus 60% of Boomers (MTV)
  • 36% of companies offer casual dress every day, 62% offer it one day per week (SHRM)
  • 27% of employers allow seasonal casual dress (SHRM)
  • 8% of companies offer a paid day off for the employee’s birthday (SHRM)
  • 45% of companies offer a phone subsidy for business use of employees’ personal phones (SHRM)
  • 34% of organizations provide employee discounts on company services (SHRM)
  • 64% of employers offer an annual company outing (SHRM)
  • 55% of companies offer a “sit-to-stand” ergonomic desk or treadmill workstation (Fidelity)
  • 23% offered company purchased tickets to events such as cultural proceedings, sporting events or theme parks (SHRM)
  • 86% of organizations reported offering paid bereavement leave (SHRM
  • 54% of employees say their workplace offers paid family sick leave or bereavement (ReportLinker)
  • 76% of organizations provide free coffee (SHRM
  • 66% of employees whose offices provide free snacks or beverages report being extremely or very happy with their current job (PeaPod
  • 16% of employers offer free snacks (ReportLinker)
  • 83% of employees agree "having healthy and fresh snack options (e.g., fruit, vegetables, yogurt, low-calorie snacks) provided in the workplace is a "huge" perk (PeaPod
  • 66% of millennials agree "If I found or was offered a job at another company with better perks, including availability of snacks, I would take it." (PeaPod
  • 37% of organizations offer acupressure/acupuncture medical coverage (SHRM)
  • 91% of organizations offer mental health coverage to their employees (SHRM
  • 88% of organizations offer on-site parking, 10% offer parking subsidies (SHRM
  • 70% of organizations allow employees to retain frequent flyer miles (SHRM
  • 8% of companies allow pets at the office (SHRM
  • 2% of organizations offered nap rooms in 2015 (SHRM
  • Highest paying companies in America, 2016: A.T. Kearney, Strategy&, Juniper Networks, McKinsey & Co., Google; 24 of 25 are in consulting or technology (Glassdoor)
  • Employee offered a gross of 60 benefits in 1996 compared to 344 benefits covered today (SHRM)
  • 97% of higher education institutions feel that personal development programs for all employees have an effect on student success (Ellucian)
  • 63% of employees say a pet-friendly office would make them more keen on a new job (Purina)
  • 33% of employees say the wish they could bring their furry friends into the office (Purina)

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Topics: Employee Engagement + Loyalty, Benefits Trends

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