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Back in the day employee benefits were something nice to have; a way to stand out in a high-demand marketplace and keep employees around.

Today, employee benefits still serve those basic purposes, but they live in a world with lots of complicating factors and nuance. Keeping up with regulations alone is challenging enough. Good luck staying on top of trends and what inspires people to stay or move.

Access Perks is here to help. We're capturing every relevant piece of information on employee benefits, perks and compensation, and sharing them out here (with links to original sources).

By relevant, we mean released within the past couple years, and primarily geared toward our American and global audiences.

Check them out here:

 

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We used to keep these statistics on our employee engagement and loyalty stats page, but we feel like benefits are complex enough to merit their own collection. Like each of our stat pages, we'll update this one on a weekly basis.

Have data you'd like to see on these pages? Drop us a link in the comments.

This page is brought to you courtesy of Access Perks, provider of America's best employee discount programs. Visit our site to learn more!

Benefits and Employee Engagement/Retention/Recruitment Stats

  • 32% of workers are looking to change jobs in 2019, citing low pay or a lack of benefits (15%) and poor company culture (10%) as the reasons (CareerBuilder)

  • Most employees would quit their job today if offered a position at a different company with a similar role, pay and benefits (O.C. Tanner)

  • 61% of full-time workers who changed jobs in the past two years said that a 9% pay boost could persuade them to quit their job, while 30% said being underpaid would probably cause them to look for another job (Ajilon)

  • 89% of employers think employees leave because of money, when only 12% actually do (O.C. Tanner)

  • 72% of employees said having more work benefits would increase job satisfaction (Zoro)

  • About two-thirds of workers would trade their work-related data for more customized compensation, benefits and rewards and 61% would do the same for more customized learning and development opportunities (Accenture)

  • 79% of Gen Z and Millennial employees said an increase in recognition rewards would make them more loyal to their employers (daVinci Payments)

  •  70% of Gen Z and Millennial employees would stay at their job for another year if given rewards amounting to only $150 over one year (daVinci Payments)

  • 70% of staff members would be at least somewhat likely to leave their current organizations and take a job with one that is known for investing in employee development and learning (The Harris Poll)

  • Among employees who left their previous job, 34% said finding a new job with more career development opportunities spurred them on (The Harris Poll)

  • Career development ranked 2nd to compensation as the reason employees left their organizations (The Harris Poll)

  • Hourly workers prefer to be developed for advancement internally rather than look elsewhere for career growth opportunities (Branch)

  • 36% of workers and nearly half of millennials would consider quitting a job that didn’t provide learning opportunities (Docebo)

  • Top reasons workers left a job were not feeling valued, not being paid enough, and inadequate opportunities for advancement (Reflektive)

  • Slightly more than half of employees ranked opportunities for growth as more important than compensation (Hibob)

  • 25% of employees reported leaving a previous job because they felt underpaid (Hibob)

  • 58% of workers said money is the main driver in choosing their work, followed by benefits and vacation packages (Reflektive)

  • 54.2% of employees would leave their job for a pay raise, career advancement (37.8%) and for better corporate benefits (20.7%) (Achievers)

  • Money remains the top reason workers quit their jobs, but it’s not always what attracts them to a new opportunity (PayScale)

  • 25% of employees cited a bigger paycheck as the top reason for quitting their job, but 27% said the opportunity to do more meaningful work is why they accepted a new position (PayScale)

  • Less than one-fifth of employees said they were unhappy at their current organization, while the same number said increased responsibilities drove them to a new job or that more pay was the key driver for switching jobs (PayScale)

  • Women were 11% more likely than men to say flexible work options drove them to a new job, and millennials were 9% more likely to leave a job for more money than boomers (PayScale)

  • 80% of workers would keep a job with benefits rather than take one that offered more pay and no benefits (AICPA)

  • 72% of workers are satisfied, but 60% are still looking around for a new job with higher wages (Addison Group)

  • 78% of workers would likely remain with their employer because of the benefits it offers, up from 72% in 2016 (WTW)

  • More than 50% of employees said they have left jobs after hearing the siren calls of better benefits elsewhere (Randstad)

  • 55% of employees would be somewhat likely to accept a job with lower compensation but a more robust benefits package (Aflac)

  • More than 35% of 18-34 year olds ranked compensation as the top motivating factor to leave their job (Ceridian)

  • Employees said their top concerns during their job search would be their experience in the hiring process, the number of perks, programs and benefits a company offers to help workers with work-life balance and their connection with a company’s culture and values (Spherion)

  • Retention (72%) and recruiting (58%) were the top reasons for increasing benefits (SHRM)

  • In companies without flexible work options, women are 20% more likely to look for a new job in the next three years and men are 30% more likely to do so (BCG)

  • 34% of female employees said their company has a flexible work program in place (BCG)

  • 69% of women with advanced degrees or high-honors undergraduate degrees that had left work would not have done so had their workplace offered more flexible work arrangements (Center for Work-Life Policy)

  • 71% of employees would quit if another employer offered them flexible scheduling in a new job (ExecuSearch)

  • 51% of employees would not consider a job that provides less flexibility than their current job (Alight Solutions)

  • 89% of employers said flexible working options are important when it comes to staff attraction and retention (Hays)

  • 33% of employees said flexible working options were critical to their remaining in employment (Hays)

  • 80% of employees who ranked their benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high also ranked job satisfaction as extremely or very high (EBRI)

  • Nearly two-thirds of employees who ranked benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high ranked their moral as excellent or very good (EBRI)

  • 83% of employees say health insurance is very or extremely important in deciding whether to stay in or change jobs (EBRI)

  • It’s to the employer’s advantage, even for small businesses, to offer benefits in the quest to attract top talent and keep their good employees from jumping ship (Clutch)

  • 79% of employees cited a competitive benefits plan as an influencer, and 77% cited cost (Wellable)

  • 45% of employers have raised pay rates in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 43% of employers increased benefits in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 36% of employers offered more flexible work arrangements in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 23% of employers offered additional recognition programs in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 17% of employers offered college loan repayment and/or college savings programs to combat the talent shortage (SunTrust)

  • To overcome technology gaps, employers said they plan to adopt change management strategies and new technologies to attract specialized or highly skilled talent (75%), find talent that can do the work faster (62%), speed up talent acquisition (57%) and reduce reliance on costly brand-name consulting firms (40%) (Catalant)

  • The top factors cited for job satisfaction were: having the latest digital and technology skills; savings or financial assistance programs and vacation (Randstad)

  • 58% of business leaders said their technology offerings are a factor in candidates’ decisions to work for them and 51% said outdated technology hampers their ability to compete for talent (Harvard Business Review)

  • Over two-thirds of businesses believe they will no longer be competitive if they don’t become “significantly digitized” by 2020 (Gartner)

  • 83% of employers say retaining employees is their top benefits objective (MetLife)
  • 51% of employers plan to leverage benefits as a retention strategy in the next three to five years (MetLife)
  • 83% of employers have changed their benefits strategy within the last three years (Empyrean)

  • 61% of U.S. adults look for career development opportunities when considering employment opportunities (Jobvite)

  • Younger workers are more likely to prefer career development to more money, while the unemployed are slightly less likely to select career growth as a top priority (Jobvite)

  • Development opportunities were a top attraction for 23% of Gen Z vs. 17% of millennials at the same age in 2013 (Gartner)

  • More than 70% of HR professionals believe outmoded work practices, sketchy career paths and limits on advancement, development and mentoring are impacting attrition and 69% identified flexible work schedules, wellness programs, fast-track promotions and other perks as problematic (Allegis Group)

  • 51% of employees would quit their job if training was not offered (Udemy)

  • More than 80% of employees would quit their jobs for better development opportunities (ExecuSearch)

  • Offering career training and development would keep 86% of millennials from leaving their current position (Bridge)

  • If a job lacks growth opportunities and avenues for leadership development, 67% of millennials would leave that position (Bridge)

  • Money is the number one motivator for 67% of job seekers and employees looking elsewhere for career opportunities (Glassdoor)

  • 43% of employees said they would leave their current jobs for another that paid better (Ajilon)

  • Half of employees would sacrifice their salary, as much as 29% of it, to work a job they enjoy (Kforce)

  • 79% of employees would not accept a job with a higher salary from a company that failed to act in response to a report of sexual harassment (The Manifest)

  • 76% of employees wouldn’t join a company offering a higher salary that sells users’ data without users’ knowledge (The Manifest)

  • 54% of employees are willing to accept a higher salary to work for employers that make donations to political candidates they dislike, block labor unions from organizing (39%) and use legal loopholes to minimize their tax liability (38%) (The Manifest)

  • 44% of workers would leave their job for one with better pay (Robert Half)

  • 58% of managers extend counteroffers to workers who say they’re leaving; these workers, on average, leave in less than two years later (Robert Half)

  • 50% of adults would leave their current job for better benefits (Yoh)

  • 42% of adults said they’d jump ship for a flexible work option (Yoh)

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  • 70% of millennials have considered leaving a job for another boasting flexible work options, but just 50% of older workers have felt the same pull (FlexJobs)

  • Almost 80% of millennials said they would be more loyal to an employer offering flexible work options, while just over 70% of older workers said they same (FlexJobs)

  • Roughly one-third of adults would leave their job for a higher-level position, a better company culture or a shorter commute (Yoh)

  • 75% of employees reported they’re more likely to stay with their employer because of their benefit program (WTW)
  • Gen Xers are slightly more satisfied with their benefits than millennials (53% vs 52%), and 49% of boomers report they are satisfied with their benefits (LIMRA)

  • 35% of millennials have turned down job offers because they were dissatisfied with the benefits, compared to 27% of all other age categories (Anthem)
  • Employees who are very satisfied w/ benefits are almost 4x more likely to be very satisfied with their jobs (MetLife)
  • One in three millennial workers, and 27% of other employees, has turned down a job offer due to insufficient or lackluster health insurance (Anthem)
  • 76% of millennials reported that benefits customization is important for increasing their loyalty, compared to 67% of baby boomers (MetLife)
  • 55% of employees cited health coverage as the greatest driver of job satisfaction, followed by paid vacation (18%), overtime pay (11%) and retirement plans (10%) (Clutch)

  • Health coverage is the reason 56% of employees remain on their current job (American’s Health Insurance Plans)

  • 68% of employers believe health benefit plans affect their reputations and can raise employee morale and satisfaction (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 75% of employers say that retaining and attracting quality employees were important outcomes of benefits (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 68% of employers say improving employee morale and satisfaction is an important consideration in employee benefits; 67% cite improving employee health (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 43% of employees said annual leave is the work-related benefit that would make them feel most loved at work, followed by public recognition (15%), team drinks (15%), training (10%), professional mentoring (7%), sleeping in once a week (7%), and getting a parking space for a month (2%) (Xexec)

  • 62% of employees under 50 wouldn't consider working for a company that didn't offer voluntary benefits (BenefitsPro)
  • 55% of workers who feel their employer cares about their well-being want to stay at their company for 10 years or more vs. 33% who don’t believe their company cares (Guardian)

  • 73% of U.S. workers said health and wellness programs are a consideration in deciding whether to work for a company (OfficeTeam)

  • 87% of U.S. workers ages 18-34, 70% ages 35-54, and 44% ages 55+ factor in health and wellness offerings in their job decisions (OfficeTeam)

  • 79% of men and 65% of women consider health and wellness in their employment decisions (OfficeTeam)

  • 59% of employees say that health and wellness benefits are important for increasing loyalty to their employer and 53% say the same about financial planning programs (MetLife)
  • If offered financial programs at work, 89% of Gen Xers would participate in them (Purchasing Power)

  • Nearly a third of millennials say they’ll be chasing higher salaries at another employer five years from now (Staples)

  • 68% of employees did not choose salary as the most important factor to inform their decisions to take or reject job opportunities (Lexington Law)

  • Reasons employees value their work and are loyal to their employer include the work they perform (55%), salary (50%) and immediate supervisor (39%) (Addison Group)

  • Almost 40% of employees chose interests and passion as the most important factor that informs their decisions to take or reject job opportunities (Lexington Law)

  • 10% of employees said benefits are the most important factor that informs their decisions to take or reject job opportunities (Lexington Law)

  • 45% of employees said they consider a prospective company’s work-life balance a crucial factor when researching a job (Lexington Law)

  • 50% of employees said they have left a position to escape a bad manager (Lexington Law)

  • 72% of employees say that having the ability to customize their benefits would increase their loyalty to their current employer (MetLife)
  • 66% of employees who receive perks are satisfied with them (Clutch)

  • 47% of people actively looking for new positions say company culture is the main reason (Hays)

  • 60% of employees say they have left jobs, or would consider leaving because they don’t like their supervisors, and 58% say they would leave their job because of negative office politics (Randstad)

  • 80% of employees would take a contract position if it offered more of what they want (Hays)

  • 23% of active job seekers would take a new position without a pay increase (Hays)

  • 41% of Gen X are happy in their role, 51% experience high or very high workplace pressure, and one-third say they are highly likely to consider leaving their current role (Hays)

  • Baby Boomers are most likely to be satisfied in their current role (48%) and least likely to consider leaving (77%) (Hays)

  • 37% of Gen X contemplate leaving to advance their careers, 5% lower than millennials (DDI)

  • 52% of employees who aren’t satisfied with their benefits want more of a benefit they already have (Clutch)

  • 14% of employees want different benefits altogether (Clutch)

  • 32% of employees say that they feel neutral about, or are not satisfied with, the benefits they receive (Clutch)

  • 42% of businesses report that their ability to recruit has been improved by their pension scheme (CBI)

  • 42% of businesses report that pension provision has a positive impact on employee retention (CBI)

  • 75% of Gen Z college grads are more likely to work for a company that offers opportunities to work abroad (Graebel)

  • 24% of Gen Xers say the desire for financial stability motivates them to stay in a job (Purchasing Power)

  • 96% of employers reported that personal financial issues affect their employees’ overall job performance (IFEBP)

  • More than one-third of U.S. workers believe their current financial concerns are negatively affecting their lives vs. just 21% two years ago (WTW)

  • 33% of workers are distracted by personal financial issues, and 46% of those distracted by financial stress say they spend three or more hours each week dealing with related issues at work (PwC)

  • 44% of employees are happy in their current role (Hays)

  • 12% of businesses are happy with current levels of employee engagement (CBI)

  • 55% of businesses think that stronger engagement would improve their ability to either retain, recruit or carry out succession planning (CBI)

  • 44% of businesses think improved employee engagement would lead to them better being able to retain, whilst 36% think it would have a positive impact on recruitment (CBI)

  • 7% of gig economy-only workers (those without access to employer-sponsored benefits) have long-term disability insurance, while 16% have access to a retirement savings account vs. 52% off full-time employees (Prudential)

  • 67% of gig-only millennials reported that they like their current work situation and wouldn’t want to change it, and 75% of workers over the age of 56 reported the same (Prudential)

  • 45% of Gen X gig-only workers reported satisfaction with their work (Prudential)

  • 70% of millennial gig-only workers (or those without a job that provides benefits) have no access to benefits vs. 44% of gig-only workers over the age of 55 (Prudential)

  • 50% of employees cite benefits as an important reason they remain with their current employer (MetLife)
  • At companies where employees are offered no benefits, only 46% of employees would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • 23% of full-time employees do not receive any benefits from their employers (Clutch)

  • At companies offering 1-5 benefits, 53% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife
  • At companies offering 11 or more benefits, 66% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • 41% of employers ranked retention as their top employee benefits objective  (MetLife)
  • Nearly 40% of employees say having a wide selection of benefits would make them feel more loyal to their employer (MetLife)
  • Workers who have a good work-life balance are 10% more likely to stay at their companies than those who don’t (TINYpulse)

  • More than 80% of millennials say they seriously consider how a position will affect their work-life balance, but only 62% of older workers agreed (Flexjobs)

  • Workers who are finding balance between their jobs and personal lives are twice as happy, more productive and show greater loyalty to their employers than those struggling to find balance (Robert Half)

  • Workers said they would rank work-life balance higher than salary when considering a job prospect (FlexJob)

  • 45% of employees said they are very or extremely satisfied with their work-life balance (Spherion)

  • Workers ages 18-35 rank career advancement opportunities (32%) and work-life balance (34%) as most important to them at work (Comparably)

  • 41% of workers older than age 35 said work-life balance was the most important feature (Comparably)

  • 34% of parents felt resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance, with more fathers than mothers expressing this sentiment (37% vs. 32%) (Working Families)

  • 46% of millennial fathers feel resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance (Working Families)

  • 37% of parents said that changing company culture to make work-life balance more acceptable should be a priority for employers (Working Families)

  • When asked which work benefits they valued most, workers chose work-life balance, only 8% said it was less important than compensation (Comparably)

  • Workers in legal, design and business development picked work-life balance as the second most important work benefit (Comparably)

  • 25% of employees would require at least a 20% increase in salary to justify making a move (West Monroe)

  • 26% of job offers are rejected due to benefits/salary not meeting expectations (MRI Network)
  • 26% of small-business employees would jump ship to a larger company if it meant better benefits offerings (Aflac)
  • 72% of small-business employees say an improvement in their benefits offerings would make them even happier (Aflac)
  • 50% of small-business employees say that having a benefits package is either extremely or very important to their happiness (Aflac)
  • Among small business employees, 33% saying they’re “satisfied” with the benefits they receive, 20% are “disappointed,” 13% are “happy,” 3% are “angry.” (Aflac)
  • 50% of employees are satisfied with their benefits (MetLife
  • 87% of employees expect their employer to support them in balancing their life between work and personal commitments (Glassdoor)

  • 41% of employed patients and survivors indicate health insurance is one of the primary reasons they want to work (Cancer and Careers)
  • 42% of employed cancer patients and survivors feel they need to stay at their current workplace because they need health insurance (Cancer and Careers)
  • 35% of employed cancer patients and survivors are afraid to change their work status because it would limit their health insurance options (Cancer and Careers)
  • 53% of employees said that financial planning programs are important for increasing loyalty (MetLife)
  • 53% of employees would like their employers to offer tools that provide suggestions on how they can improve their financial situation (WTW)

  • 60% of employees said they would be more loyal to a company that helped cover prenatal care, family planning and abortion care (NARAL Pro-Choice America)

  •  45% of job seekers said it’s become harder to find a job this year, despite low unemployment numbers (Jobvite)

Salary and Base Compensation Stats

  • 49% of professionals feel they are paid fairly at their jobs (Robert Half)

  • While employees prefer pay over benefits, most business leaders believe employees want benefits and perks over beefier paychecks (WSU)

  • 32%-35% of employers are reserving variable pay for executives and managers, while 22%-25% are reserving it for lower-level employees (Gallagher)

  • 39% of organizations use variable pay for at least one employee group (Gallagher)

  • 20% of employers reported using lump sum awards for at least one employee group (Gallagher)

  • The portion of compensation subject to performance rises from 5% for low-level workers to 25% for executives (Gallagher)

  • 26% of employers indicated higher healthcare costs were a primary factor for keeping salary increases in check (Gallagher)

  • Almost 57% of employees would give up any and all offered benefits if it meant their salary increased (Zoro)

  • For a $5,000 salary increase or an extra week of PTO, the majority of employees would happily say goodbye to office birthday celebrations, company memorabilia, free snacks, and even free coffee (Zoro)

  • 41% of employees said a higher salary would improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 25% of workers say they are very well paid and 48% say they are somewhat well paid (CNBC)

  • 55% of full-time employees rank fair compensation as the first or second most valuable employer attribute, closely followed by fair treatment (54%) and ethical standards (38%) (Clutch)

  • Money is a major pain point for 80% of workers (Ceridian)

  • 80% of North American workers are stressed to some capacity about pay and money issues on a regular basis (Ceridian)

  • 27% of employees believe their employers do not care about their financial wellbeing, and only 25% believe they care very much (Ceridian)

  • 59% of full and part-time employees are currently paid every two weeks but 37% would prefer to be paid weekly (Ceridian)

  • 30% of workers are content with how transparent employers are about pay (Ceridian)

  • About 50% of female workers and 35% of male workers said not earning enough money is the top reason they’re unhappy with their employers (Ceridian)

  • 37% of workers said they aren’t comfortable discussing pay with managers (Ceridian)

  • About 30% of workers said they must turn to credit cards to pay unexpected expenses, and 11% must borrow from relatives (Ceridian)

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  • Employers are on average offering new talent 15% pay increases to come on board, but employees only expect a 10% pay raise when switching employers (Gartner)

  • Organizations with attractive EVPs can reduce the compensation premium needed to attract qualified candidates as well as potentially decrease annual employee turnover by just under 70% (Gartner)

  • Companies using a daily payment benefit were able to fill open positions 52% faster and reduce employee turnover by 41% (DailyPay)

  • Employees are willing to take a 13% reduction in pay in order to receive daily versus weekly pay (DailyPay)

  • 47% of employees feel underpaid, 44% are dissatisfied with benefits and 43% feel unsatisfied with their career path (Addison Group)

  • Nearly half of employees have expressed concerns that their current pay did not line up with that of other employees in similar roles (Paychex)

  • 46% of professionals feel they are underpaid at their jobs (Robert Half)

  • 5% of professionals feel they are overpaid at their jobs (Robert Half)

  • 90% of employees would forgo 23% of their earnings – an average of $21,000 a year – for more meaningful work (Betterup)

  • Male employees said they wanted an average annual salary of $444,958 while women wanted an average annual salary of $278,637 (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • Women make about 80 cents for every dollar men earn, which increases to 92 cents when education and occupation are factored in (Georgetown University)

  • When measured by total earnings across the most recent 15 years for all workers who worked in at least one year, women workers’ earnings were 49% of men’s earnings (Georgetown University)

  • 71% of employees won’t tolerate companies paying women and minority employees less than others for doing the same job (The Manifest)

  • Half of all employees received a raise or promotion in the prior year (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

  • About 70% of HR managers and senior execs expect employee pay raises to stay at 3% or less on average (PayScale)

  • More than 40% of employers gave raises of 10% or more for some jobs within their organization (PayScale)

  • More than 60% of employers plan to raise wages in 2019, with 70% saying increase will range from .5% to 3% (LaSalle)

  • Nearly 60% of Americans would take a job they love over a job they hate, even if the preferred position paid half the amount of salary they would earn at the job they dislike (Lexington Law)

  • Cities with the most workers who feel underpaid: San Diego (62%), Austin (54%), Houston (53%), Nashville (53%) and Philadelphia (52%) (Robert Half)

  • Cities with the fewest professionals who report being underpaid: Miami (33%), Dallas (37%), New York (37%), Los Angeles (39%), San Francisco (39%) (Robert Half)

  • 52% of workers ages 55 and older think they are compensated fairly, 44% ages 18-34 and 51% ages 35-54 feel the same (Robert Half)

  • 31% of U.S. employees don’t believe their employers pay fairly when factoring in age or race, and 48% believe men are paid more than women (Begom)

  • 49% of women were more apt to feel underpaid compared to men (44%) (Robert Half)

  • Men are paid 18% less when they’re viewed as warm, agreeable, caring and sympathetic (Harvard Business Review)

  • Men are more likely to leave for being underpaid compared to women (39% vs. 33%) (Ajilon)

  • Employees with a bachelors degree or higher, as well as those earning more than $100,000 per year were most likely to say they’re being paid fairly (50% and 57%) (Robert Half)

  • U.S. employers project to give exempt, non-management employees average pay increases of 3.1% in 2019, compared to 3% in 2018 (WTW)

  • Average merit salary increases aren’t expected to reach beyond 2.9% in 2019 (Mercer)

  • The average total budget increase, including merit and promotional budgets, is expected to be 3.4% (Mercer)

  • 78% of organizations are concerned with talent retention, 73% with talent attraction and just over half a need to pay for performance (Mercer)

  • 80% of organizations have an annual salary increase budget to stay market competitive and reward individual performance (77%), but less than half do so for talent retention (Mercer)

  • Workers’ wages, in relation to inflation, dropped by 1.8% (Mercer)

  • With the rapidly rising Consumer Price Index, U.S. workers earned 1.4% less this year than they did in 2017 (Mercer)

  • About half of employers have a separate budget for promotional increase, which rings in at an average of 1.2% of payroll, with an average promotion salary increase at 7.8% of base pay (Mercer)

  • 88% of employers use performance as a driver of base salary adjustments (Mercer)

  • A little less than half of employees would accept a smaller salary to work for an environmentally friendly and socially responsible employer (Swytch)

  • More than 10% of employees would take a salary decrease of $5,000-$10,000 each year and 3% would accept a decrease of more than $10,000 to work at an environmentally friendly and socially responsible employer (Swytch)

  • 52% of organizations reported a need to deliver “pay for performance” (Mercer)

  • Higher pay was the first priority for hourly workers, followed by predictable work schedule, a positive work culture, scheduling flexibility and supportive managers (Branch)

  • Nonexempt hourly employees can expect larger pay increases next year with 3% in 2019 vs. 2.9% in 2018 (WTW)

  • Only 3% of companies plan to freeze salaries next year (WTW)

  • Pay raises have hovered around 3% for the past decade, with 2008 showing the last significant increase in pay at 3.8% (WTW)

  • Star performers receive the highest possible ratings and were granted an average increase of 4.6% in 2018, 70% higher than the 2.7% increase granted to those receiving an average rating (WTW)

  • U.S. workers’ wages grew on average 3% over last year, an increase of $0.80 per hour, raising the average hourly wage to $27.46 (ADP)

  • Wage growth for newcomers to the workforce dipped by .1%, while wages increased by 4.5% for workers age 55 and older (ADP)

  • Job switchers age 55 and older are seeing higher wages, up 6.3% - 1.5% higher than workers ages 35 to 54 (ADP)

  • Wages for full-time workers who switched jobs grew by 4.9% on average year-over-year (ADP)

  • Wage growth for job holders was 4.3% on average year-over-year (ADP)

  • 33% of organizations are offering higher salaries than they were last year (Randstad)
  • Base pay is expected to rise 3.0 percent in 2017, up slightly from 2.8 percent in 2016 (Aon Hewitt)
  • Workers saw a 2.9% raise in base pay in 2017 (Aon)

  • 76% of business leaders plan to raise wages (JPMorgan Chase & Co)

  • 48% of employers reported plans for increasing wages in 2018 compared to 58% in 2017 (LaSalle Network)

  • In 2018, workers are projected to see a 3% increase in base pay (Aon)

  • 51% of senior managers said they expect year-end bonus levels to be at least somewhat higher than 2016 (Robert Half)

  • Employers plan to spend only 12.5% of payroll on bonuses, the lowest increase since 2010 (Aon)

  • 70% of decision makers say they plan to offer bonuses in 2017 (Modis)

  • While 63% of entry-level employees wanted extra opportunities to earn more money, only 49% of employees in middle management desired the same (Zoro)

  • 40% of employers are reducing or eliminating pay increases for less-than-stellar performers and 15% are setting performance targets that are more stringent (Aon)

  • 19% of U.S. workers are satisfied with their current salaries (Indeed)

  • 60% of U.S. workers said it would take an extra $6,000 per year to feel comfortable/satisfied with their job (Indeed)

  • 35% of workers were satisfied with their financial situation this year vs 48% from two years ago (WTW)

  • 44% of employees believe they are paid at or above market rate (Hays)

  • 90% of employees who believed they were paid below market rate for their jobs were actually paid at market or above market; only 11% of people who believed they were underpaid were correct about that belief (PayScale)

  • 75% of people who think they are paid at or above the market rate report being satisfied with their job (PayScale)

  • 59% of workers who believe they are paid below market still report job satisfaction (PayScale)

  • 47% of employees believe fair and market competitive compensation would improve their work situations (Mercer)

  • 28% of HR leaders identified ensuring rewards competitiveness as a top priority (Mercer)

  • 10% of organizations froze salaries in 2016 (Aon Hewitt)
  • US businesses are planning to boost pay by around 3% on average in 2017, the same as 2016 (WorldatWork)
  • Workers’ wages on average rose only 2% in 2016 (Colonial Life)
  • 59% of employers say they do not plan to make any changes to their executive compensation strategies (WTW)

  • 99% of employers plan to give annual wage increases, averaging 3.0%; executives can expect increases averaging 3.1% (WTW)
  • The average 2017 total salary increase budget is 3.0%, the same as it has been for the past 3 years (WorldatWork)
  • Base salary increases are being awarded to 89% of employees in 2017 (WorldatWork)
  • 18.6% of companies plan to award merit increases of up to 2.5% in 2017; 45.1% plan on 2.51% to 5%; 2.1% plan on 5.01% to 10%; 1.6% plan on 10% or greater (BLR)
  • Nearly two-thirds of workers are accepting a promotion without an increase in pay (OfficeTeam)

  • 39% of HR managers said promoting employees without a raise is common in their organization (OfficeTeam)

  • 72% of men and 55% of women said they’re receptive to a promotion without a pay increase (OfficeTeam)

  • 72% of workers ages 18-34 said they’ll take a new title without a pay hike, compared to 61% of workers ages 35-54 and 53% of those 55+ (OfficeTeam)

  • Promotional increases were awarded to 7.9% of employees in 2016 (WorldatWork)
  • Of the promotional increases received, the size of the average pay was 8.4% (WorldatWork)
  • 29.2% of employers did not award merit increases in 2016 (BLR)
  • 49.2% of employers did not offer general increases in 2017 (BLR)
  • 86.9% of employers did not reward employees who failed to meet the requirements of their jobs in 2016, and 57.2% didn’t reward employees needing improvement (BLR)
  • Exempt workers will receive 4.5% on average, or 73% more than the 2.6% raises average performers can expect in 2018; below-average performers can expect increases of about 1.0% (WTW)
  • 63% of employers say they feel they have to pay workers more because the market is getting more competitive for talent (CareerBuilder)

  • 53% of workers say they would prefer a salary increase over any other perk (Teem)
  • 78% of American workers are living paycheck to paycheck (CareerBuilder)
  • 31% of struggling employees said money concerns were keeping them from doing their best work (WTW)

  • 29% of struggling employees were fully engaged at work (WTW)

New call-to-action

  • 16% of workers claim their jobs don’t offer them the opportunity to add money to their savings (Bankrate)

  • 81% of struggling employees are living paycheck to paycheck (WTW)

  • 38% of U.S. hourly workers who make $20 or less per hour say they’re struggling to make ends meet (Snag)

  • 80% of underemployed workers are willing to work more than one job to earn a living wage, but 74% would prefer having one full-time, decent-paying job (Snag)

  • 54% of underemployed workers are actively looking for a better-paying full-time job (Snag)

  • The average debt-to-salary for 20-30 year olds is 60% to 70% or higher (PayScale)

  • 62% of those in health care/social assistance are concerned with salary and total compensation (Modis)

  • HR salaries flatten after three years (Namely)

  • The average salary for HR professionals is $98,048 (Namely)

  • 79% of workers say they don’t earn their desired salary, with 36% saying they don’t earn anywhere near it and 58% say they don’t think they are better off financially than their parents (CareerBuilder)

  • 8% of workers have current salaries of $100,000 or more and 21% say they feel they need to earn $100,000 or more to be successful (CareerBuilder)

  • 37.3% of employees say it would be very difficult to meet their current financial obligations if their next paycheck were delayed for a week, while 33.78% say it would be somewhat difficult (APA)

  • 59.66% of employees say they are very certain their payroll withholding and net amount of their paycheck are correct each payday, while 27.38% are somewhat certain (APA)

  • 93.74% of employees receive their pay via direct deposit, while 4.3% receive their pay via a paper paycheck; .73% receive it via a payroll card; .53% receive their pay via a prepaid reloadable card; .7% receive pay via another method – most of those say they get paid in cash (APA)

  • 63.13% of employees say higher wages are more important than health benefits, while 36.87% say better health care benefits are more important (APA)

  • Providing simple savings options can help reduce financial stress and boost productivity for lower-wage workers (Common Wealth)

  • 75% of workers earning less than $60,000 a year believe that if their companies offered workplace savings programs at the same time as salary increases, they’d be less stressed and more confident about their finances (Commonwealth)

  • Of employees who have savings, 43% said they had less than $400 set aside (Commonwealth)

  • The probability of employees being able to save increases by 2% for every additional dollar earned, up to a wage of $20/hr (Commonwealth)

  • 57% of workers report they are very or somewhat stressed about their financial situation (Prudential)

  • 59% of employees worry about their future financial state (WTW)

  • 48% of middle-income earners worry about their household’s financial situation at least once a week (Mass Mutual)

  • 37% of employees said they felt “not very” or “not at all” financially secure (Mass Mutual)

  • 50% of global workers often worry about their future financial state, and two-thirds said they felt their future financial state would be worse off relative to that of their parents’ generation (WTW)

  • 55% of employees believe their employer cares about their financial well-being (PwC)

  • 62% of Millennials are more likely to say that their loyalty to their company is influenced by how much the company cares about their financial well-being as compared to Gen X (50%) and baby boomers (36%) (PwC)

  • 72% of millennials and 71% of Gen X are more likely to be attracted to another company that cares more about their financial well-being than baby boomers (45%) (PwC)

  • 71% of workers have accepted a job when they knew their skill set and experience were worth more than what they were getting paid (CareerBuilder)

  • 77% of executives say that wages are the most important job factor for employees, beating out health insurance by nearly 28% (Adecco)
  • 10% of workers earning $100,000 or more live paycheck to paycheck (CareerBuilder)
  • 36% of employees say that “appreciation is best demonstrated with money” (AttaCoin)
  • 44% of workers said they would leave their current job for one that pays more (OfficeTeam)

  • 41% of employees say a significant increase in income is very important to them when considering a new job (Gallup)
  • Top reasons for leaving a job: insufficient pay (44%), limited career paths (43%), lack of challenging work (30%), work-life balance (28%), and lack of recognition (27%) (Randstad)

  • 81% of employees would consider leaving their current role for the right offer (Hays)

  • 60% of current undergrads expect jobs to start at $60,000 annually; 10% expect starting salaries of $100,000 a year (Yello)
  • College seniors expect to earn approximately $53,483 at their first job after college (iCIMS)
  • 54% of college seniors said they expect $50,000+, a 12% increase from 2016; on average, entry-level employees can expect to earn approximately $45,361 (iCIMS)
  • Hospitals employed the largest number of workers making less than $15 an hour (MGH & Perelman School of Medicine)

  • Raising the minimum wage to $15/hr would decrease poverty rates among female health care workers by up to 50%, while increasing U.S. health care costs by 1.5% (MGH & Perelman School of Medicine)

  • The average hourly wage for female healthcare workers is almost 25% lower than the average for men working in health care (MGH & Perelman School of Medicine)

  • About one-third of female healthcare workers make less than $15 per hour, and nearly half of black and Latina women in healthcare earn less than $15 per hour (MGH & Perelman School of Medicine)

  • Black women are paid 38% less than white men and 21% less than white women (Lean In)

  • A third of Americans aren’t aware of the pay disparity between black women and white men, and half of Americans don’t know about the gap between black women and white women (Lean In)

  • The disparity in black women’s wages amounts to $800,000 over the course of a career in lost earnings (Lean In)

  • 40% of people aware of the pay gap still underestimate its magnitude (Lean In)

  • Racism, sexism or both do not affect today’s workplace according to 70% of people who are not black, yet 64% of black women say they’ve faced those forces at some point during their careers (Lean In)

  • 44% of men expect to eventually make $100,000, compared to 20% of women (CareerBuilder)
  • 61% of professional recruiters believe men earn more than women for the same jobs (Jobvite)

  • Men are offered higher salaries than women for the same work 63% of the time (Hire)

  • Companies pay women on average 4% to as much at 45% less than men in the same jobs (Hire)

  • 54% of women found out they were being paid less than a male peer in the same role, compared to 19% of men who learned they were paid less than a colleague (Hire)

  • Employers paid African-American and Hispanic women 90 cents for every dollar they paid white men in the same roles (Hire)

  • Women in education technology received 10% less than men doing similar work, and women in the health and finance industries were paid 7% less than their male peers (Hire)

  • The wage gap between men and women was 8% in the San Francisco Bay area and 11% in Seattle, which had the highest gender gap (Hire)

  • 60% of women feel underpaid (Paysa)
  • 45% of workers said they rarely or never get the money they deserve (Mental Health America)

  • 51% of men say their organization does an adequate job of matching performance to pay, while only 43% of women say the same (Mercer)

  • 48% of younger millennials (ages 26 to 30) said they felt they were fairly paid, compared with 50% of older millennials (ages 31-35) and 54% of Gen Z (ages 18-25) (Comparably)

  • 40% of Gen Z employees think they’ll earn more than $100,000 a year at the peak of their career (InsideOut)

  • 80% of employees would pay to keep co-workers from learning their salaries (UCLA & Harvard Business School)

  • About 50% of employees said they wouldn’t accept $125 in exchange for telling five of their peers what they earn (UCLA & Harvard Business School)

  • 89% of employees said they believe that if they ask coworkers about their salaries, they will get asked about theirs (UCLA & Harvard Business School)

  • 45% of U.S. workers know their colleagues’ pay rates, and 46% admit they shared or talked about their wages with colleagues (Begom)

  • Less than 19% of U.S. workers are comfortable talking about compensation with their managers or supervisors (Begom)

  • When asked what their top priority would be if they became boss, 27% of Gen Z said they would increase employee pay while 35% of Gen Z and 32% of Millennials said they were likely share pay information with coworkers (Comparably)

  • 23% of female workers don’t feel like they are paid fairly compared to their counterparts (Randstad)

  • 40% of employees have discussed salary with a coworker before, and 49% of female workers would leave a job if they learned a male counterpart was making 25% more (Randstad)

  • 25% of workers felt they were adequately paid (Mental Health America)

  • Women working full-time, on average, make 79 cents to the man’s dollar (Prudential)
  • 55% of professionals tried negotiating a higher salary with their last job offer, a 16 point increase from 2018 (Robert Half)

  • 68% of male employees tried negotiating pay, compared to 45% of women (Robert Half)

  • 65% of professionals ages 18-34 asked for higher salaries versus 55% of those ages 35-54 and 38% of those 55+ (Robert Half)

  • 70% of senior managers expected some back and forth negotiating from candidates (Robert Half)

  • 62% of senior managers said they were open to negotiating pay and 59% said they were open to negotiating benefits and perks than they were a year ago (Robert Half)

  • Men (56%) are more comfortable negotiating salary than women (38%) (Jobvite)
  • Women candidates who declined to discuss their past pay history were paid 1.8% less than women who did (PayScale)

  • Men candidates who declined to discuss their past earnings were paid 1.2% higher than men who did (PayScale)

  • The median annual income of women age 65 and older is 42% lower than men (Prudential)
  • More than 21% of men were dissatisfied with their earnings, compared with 16% of women (Indeed)

  • 53.1% of women and 52.9% of men plan to ask for a raise (Indeed)

  • 60% of workers said they want a raise simply because they feel their performance merits one (Indeed)

  • 63% of top-performing companies don’t plan to conduct audits of their pay practices to look for ethnicity and gender gaps (PayScale)

  • A third of women do not believe they are making as much as their male counterparts even though they have similar experience and qualifications; 12% of men feel the same way (CareerBuilder)

  • 35% of women don’t expect to reach a salary over $50,000 during their career, compared to 17% of men, while 47% of men expect to reach a six-figure salary, compared to 22% of women (CareerBuilder)

  • 94% of employers think there should be equality of pay in the U.S. (CareerBuilder)

  • 15% of employers do not believe female workers make the same wage as their male counterparts at their organization (CareerBuilder)

  • 50% of HR managers think that female workers make the same wage as their male counterparts at their organization, and 35% said they would hope they do (CareerBuilder)

  • 82% of employers said there should be transparency of pay in the U.S. (CareerBuilder)

  • 80% of women agree they would switch employers if they felt another company had greater gender equality (Randstad)

  • Women of color are 19% less likely to receive a raise than white men and men of color are 25% less likely (PayScale)

  • 70% of workers received a wage increase with 39% receiving the amount they asked for and 31% receiving less (PayScale)

  • A third of workers reported getting a raise before they requested one (PayScale)

  • The most common justification for not granting workers a raise was budget restraints (49%) (PayScale)

  • Among the employees who were told a budget couldn’t accommodate their pay increase, only 22% believed this rationale (PayScale)

  • 72% of workers didn’t accept the rationale for why they didn’t get a raise, and 71% who received no rationale said they planned to look for a new job within six months (PayScale)

  • As long as workers believe their employer’s rationale for not giving them a raise, 50% had the same level of job satisfaction as employees who received a raise (PayScale)

  • 33% of employees who were denied a raise were provided no rationale (PayScale)

  • Of employees that received some rationale as to why they didn’t get a raise, just over 25% actually believed it and of those who didn’t believe the rationale or didn’t receive one, more than 70% said they planned to seek a new job in the next six months (PayScale)

  • 57% of employees who believed the rationale they were given when not getting a raise and 42% of employees who did receive the raise they requested were planning to leave their job (PayScale)

  • In order to receive an immediate 10% annual raise in salary, Americans would give up: dental care for the next five years (40.06%), all social media accounts for the next five years (53.55%), watching Game of Thrones for life (88.61%), exercise for the next five years (43.86%), the right to vote in all elections for life (34.98%), their child’s future or future child’s right to vote in all elections for life (9.13%), all alcoholic beverages for the next five years (73.42%), Social Security benefits for the next two years (17.93%), access to health insurance for the next five years (18.9%), watching movies for the next three years (50.65%), all their vacation days for the next five years (15.27%), and all caffeinated  products for the next two years (47.74%) (Hire)

  • In order to receive an immediate 10% annual raise in salary, Americans would: eat a single tide pod (5.33%), work one day every weekend for the next year (50.4%), work an extra 10 hours per week for life (55.9%), and break up with their partner or significant other (12.2%) (Hire)

  • More than two-thirds of workers said they’d prefer additional benefits over a pay raise, citing healthcare (36%) first, followed by flexible work hours (35%) and yearly holiday leave (34%) (Indeed)

  • 44% of workers said their employers could improve their happiness by awarding a pay raise of 25%, and 33% said their happiness would improve with a 10% raise (One4all)

  • 46% of Millennials have asked for a raise in the last two years (Bank of America)

  • 80% of Millennials who asked for a raise got one (Bank of America)

  • 51% of workers have not asked for a raise (CareerBuilder)

  • 41% of women never ask their current employers for a raise (Paysa)
  • Employers deny women a raise more often than men, at 42% versus 33% (Paysa)
  • Older working women with college degrees are twice as likely as college-educated men to be in low-paying jobs (22% vs 11%) (The New School)

  • 53% of employers offer job candidates less money than they are willing to pay, and of those employers, more than 25% said they low-ball candidates by $5,000 or more (CareerBuilder)

  • 60% of job seekers reported being at least somewhat comfortable negotiating their salary compared to 51% a year ago (Jobvite)

  • 67% of workers were unable to negotiate for their current salary (Monster)

  • For pay negotiations, 41.5% of workers said their company told them what they would make (Monster)

  • 4.4% of workers reported they were offered a pay rate higher than what they’d asked for (Monster)

  • 14.6% of candidates provided a salary range and the employer offered them a salary within that range (Monster)

  • 15.3% of workers said their final salary offer was less than what they requested (Monster)

  • 54% have negotiated with their current employer for a higher salary in the past year (Addison Group)

  • 39% of job finalists tried to negotiate a higher salary than the one offered (Robert Half)

  • Employers said they were more comfortable negotiating a higher salary with a new employer (54%) than they were asking for a raise in their current job (49%) (Robert Half)

  • More than half of workers research compensation online to see if they’re competitive in the market (Addison Group)

  • 56% of workers said they don’t negotiate pay (CareerBuilder)

  • 51% of workers don’t negotiate pay because they are uncomfortable asking for more money; 47% fear the employer will rescind the job offer if they do so; and 36% don’t want to appear greedy (CareerBuilder)

  • 45% of workers age 35+ typically negotiate the first offer, which is higher than workers ages 18-34 (42%) (CareerBuilder)

  • 47% of men say they negotiate first offers vs. 42% of women (CareerBuilder)

  • 29% of job seekers negotiated their salary at their current or most recent job (Jobvite)
  • 71% of workers don't ask for more money in their current or most recent jobs (Jobvite)
  • 84% of workers who negotiate a higher wage are successful (Jobvite)
  • 39% of managers said asking for a 5% raise is asking for too much money (Paysa)
  • Employees earn a 5.2% pay increase on average when changing jobs (Glassdoor)
  • A 10% increase in base pay increases the odds an employee will stay at the company by 1.5 percent (Glassdoor)
  • 60% of hiring managers report job seekers are asking for more money compared to six months ago. In healthcare, this rises to 66% (DHI Group)
  • 72% of candidates want to hear about salary range during job interviews (LinkedIn)
  • 59% of IT professionals feel they’re underpaid; 24% don’t expect a raise of more than 5% in 2017 (Spiceworks)
  • 61% of current tech workers say they are underpaid (Blind)

  • A little over one-third of tech workers said they were paid fairly and 5% said they were overpaid for their position (Blind)

  • 41% of tech employees feel they are paid unfairly (Blind)

  • 60% of tech workers said their current employer discourages talk about salary between co-workers (Blind)

  • 97% of employees want to be recognized and rewarded for contributions beyond the organization’s financial results and activity metrics (Mercer)
  • 44% of workers felt skilled employees were unrecognized for their work (Mental Health America)

  • Almost all HR certifications lead to a pay raise of some sort, with increases ranging from 2.9% to 28% (PayScale)

  • 60% of organizations said they’re very concerned about worker retention in 2018, but 73% expect wage increases to remain at or under 3% as they were in 2017 (PayScale)

  • 67% of managers think employees are fairly paid, while only 21% of employees think their pay is adequate (PayScale)

  • Minimum wage violations are causing affected workers to lose out on an estimated $15 billion in wages (Politico)

  • 41% of the wages states order employers to pay workers aren’t recovered (Politico)

  • One of the most common recruiting methods is offering competitive salaries (43%) (Hays)

  • 75% of executives believe that in the next decade, in order to recruit and retain talent, compensation alone will not be enough (Covestro)

  • 71% of employers raised salaries in 2017; 43% did so by more than 3% (Hays)

  • 62% of managers boosted a salary offer to woo a specific candidate (Hays)

  • 48% of hiring decision makers note salary and compensation is the most influential factor for a candidate decision on where to work (Glassdoor)

  • 45% of hiring decision makers note that salary is the top reason for employees changing jobs (Glassdoor)

  • 77% of Millennials would be willing to take a salary cut in exchange for long-term job security (Qualtrics)
  • 90% of millennials would choose to stay in a job for the next 10 years if they knew they'd get annual raises and upward career mobility (Qualtrics)
  • 58% of workers say they’d start a job with a lower salary if that meant working for a great boss (Randstad)

  • 85% of managers claim they know how to explain pay decisions to employees, and only 37% of organizations agree (PayScale)

  • 48% of employers haven’t decided how they’ll communicate the pay ratio to employees, 39% plan to have their organization’s leadership answer employees’ questions, 16% are preparing managers for discussions with workers, 14% have a detailed communication plan to inform workers, and about 14% don’t plan to inform workers at all (WTW)

  • New call-to-action90% of workers would prefer bonuses or extra time off rather than the company-sponsored event (Randstad)

  • 61% of employers are planning on presenting workers with holiday bonuses (CareerBuilder)

  • 77% of employees said their favorite type of holiday bonus is cash; 15% said paid time off; and 5% said gift cards (Express Employment Professionals)

  • 62% of workers and 78% of Millennials said they’d accept a pay cut to work for a company with a mission that mirrored their values (Udemy)

  • 71% of employees would take a pay cut for their ideal job (Hays)

  • 21% of employees would take a 10% pay cut to work in a nicer workplace (Staples)

  • 36% of millennial workers plan to take a pay cut to work fewer hours (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • Gen Z, manual workers, low-wage earners and workers from densely-populated areas reported experiencing the highest levels of extreme stress (Ginger)

  • 36% of parents are willing to take a pay cut, while 41% of millennial parents intended to downshift to a less stressful job (Working Families)

  • 71% of workers say the ability to provide for themselves and their families is what motivates them to do their job, followed by money (63%), and the ability to make a difference (38%) (CareerBuilder)

  • Millennials’ annual hourly earnings are growing at a rate nearly double the national rate (5.8% vs 3%) (Paychex)

  • The average hourly wage for a female millennial is $20.44, but $23.03 for men (Paychex)

  • Female millennial hourly workers experience a lower annual growth rate in hourly wages at 5.3% vs 6.2% for men (Paychex)

  • 90% of organizations provide severance packages, 38% offer the benefit to all workers (RiseSmart)
  • Among IT professionals who plan to leave, 75% are looking for a higher salary (Spiceworks)

  • Black men’s average hourly earnings were 80% of that of white men’s in 1979. By 2016, the pay gap widened to 70% on the dollar (San Francisco Research)

  • 54% of employees have had a paycheck problem while being paid (Kronos)
  • 29% of hourly and 41% of salaried workers are completely satisfied with pay (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (65%) are more satisfied than hourly workers (50%) with vacation time (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (48%) are more satisfied than hourly workers (34%) with their retirement benefits (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (45%) are more satisfied with opportunities for promotion than hourly workers (35%) (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (55%) are more satisfied with recognition for accomplishments at work than hourly workers (46%) (Gallup)

  • 15% of salaried workers have been shortchanged on a paycheck; 16% reported being paid late; 23% said they have been paid early (Kronos)
  • 80% of companies are paying salespeople inaccurate commission rates (WorldatWork)
  • 18% of employers don't report commission results to salespeople; 47% are slow to process commission payments, sometimes taking four or more weeks (WorldatWork)
  • 42% of employees said taxes and deductions on their paychecks are confusing to read and understand (Kronos)
  • 45% of employees would feel more engaged with their job if their employer helped them better understand the impact of taxes and deductions (Kronos)
  • 80% of employers say they pay U.S.-born workers and immigrants the same for doing the same job (CareerBuilder)
  • Employers planned to pay high-skilled H-1B visa holders a median salary of $80,000 in 2016, up from $69,000 a decade ago (Pew)
  • The annual media base pay in the U.S. grew only .9% year over year in January 2018 to $51,364 (Glassdoor)

  • 66% of employees said they’d rather receive two tickets to a concert of their choice than three times the value of those tickets paid into their paycheck over the course of a year; 34% of employees chose the money (Xexec)

  • 35% of employees chose a small token gift like cake, ice cream or chocolate, while 65% chose receiving 10 times its monetary value in additional salary (Xexec)

  • The industry with the biggest wage gain was medical technology, in which the median salary rose 4.1% to $54,747 (Glassdoor)

  • The median salary for H-1B visa holders is higher than the median wage for U.S. workers in similar jobs, who earned a median wage of $75,036 in 2016 (Pew)
  • 44% of CIOs say salary demands is the top barrier to securing the best IT job candidates (Robert Half)
  • Cybersecurity professionals of color earn, on average $115,000 a year compared with $122,000 industry average (ICMCP)

  • Whites in cybersecurity are more likely to receive a salary increase in the past year than those of other races and ethnicities (ICMCP)

  • 79% of professionals found a heavy workload to be less stressful than not having enough work to do, and 74% would prefer a heavier workload and more pay to less work and less pay (Korn Ferry)

  • With wage parity, the data reveals companies publishing their pay equity analysis reported a 3% ROE advantage (JUST Capital)

Healthcare and Wellness Benefits Stats

  • 34% of employees feel “extremely satisfied” with the benefit options their employers offer, up from just 22% in 2012 (Connecture)
  • Americans overestimate their benefits’ value thinking they make up on average 40% of their total compensation, while data shows they actually account for an average of 31.7% of total compensation (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

  • 62% of millennials are generally satisfied with their benefits, and 63% with their company culture (LaSalle)

  • About a third of workers said the most difficult part of making annual benefit elections is keeping track of changes within the plan (Paychex)

  • 28% of workers said it’s challenging evaluating the providers and plan options for benefits (Paychex)

  • More than 40% of employees found dealing with multiple benefits vendors to be confusing (Health Advocate)

  • 78% of employers offered workers live support services to help navigate their benefits (Health Advocate)

  • Employers have cited employee engagement strategies including: intranets and newsletters (78%), events and meetings (67%), and contributions to FSAs/HSAs/HRAs (65%) (Health Advocate)

  • 54% of employers have cited using employee engagement incentives like reduced insurance premiums, cash and gifts (Health Advocate)

  • 73% of full-time employees want and expect to have 24/7 access to their benefits (Health Advocate)

  • About 90% of employees understood all their employer’s benefits when they took their current job, 86% have kept up to date with benefits changes, and 86% know where to get information on how to use their benefits (AICPA)

  • 28% of employees are very confident they’re fully using their benefits (AICPA)

  • When employees were asked which three benefits would help them meet their financial goals, 56% cited a 401(k) match or health insurance, 33% cited paid time off, 21% flexible work hours and 15% working remotely (AICPA)

  • 68% of employers believe their employees have enough options available to help them meet their health care financial obligations, down from 73% last year (Aflac)

  • 81% of employers that offer benefits agree their company’s benefits offerings increase employee satisfaction (Aflac)

  • 61% of employees are satisfied with their benefits compared with 46% in 2011 (Aflac)

  • 67% of millennials, 62% of gen x and 61% of baby boomers believe their employer’s benefit plans are competitive with those offered by other organizations (PwC)

  • 70% of millennials, 71% of gen x and 75% of baby boomers say they review their benefit elections every year and make changes if needed (PwC)

  • 70% of workers say they are comfortable sharing personal health information with their employers in return for personalized guidance in managing their health – a marked difference from the 53% who said that last year (Alight)

  • Millennials are the most comfortable (79%) sharing personal health information with their employers, followed by Gen X (70%) and Baby Boomers (56%) (Alight)

  • Workers are slightly less comfortable, but three in five are still willing to share personal financial information with their employer to allow them to provide personalized financial guidance or planning (Alight)

  • Millennials are the most comfortable sharing personal financial information with their employer (67%), followed by Gen X (59%) and Baby Boomers (44%) (Alight)

  • 15% of employee candidates don’t ask about benefits at all during the interview process (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 80% of employees who said they have a good variety of benefits to choose from also said they identified strongly with their organization’s vision and values, as opposed to 40% of those who don’t (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • Over 50% of employees say they can’t access their benefits in the way they prefer and 21% say they can easily access their benefits (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 46% of employees that discuss benefits face-to-face with an employer report being satisfied (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 81% of employees who can easily access their benefits said they feel loyal to their employer and 79% say they were proud to work for their organization (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 77% of employees who understand their benefits offering said they saw themselves staying at their organization for the foreseeable future (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • Employee burnout is costly, as burnout is estimated to be attributed to 120,000 deaths per year and $190 billion in healthcare spending (O.C. Tanner)

  • Healthcare coverage was the most important employee benefit followed by retirement savings programs (Randstad)

  • 28% of employers made changes to their healthcare benefits, with 32% adding health insurance and 36% adding other healthcare benefits (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • 59% of small business reps said their company offered healthcare benefits to full and part-time workers, vs. 85% of overall employers (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • 28% of employers cited cost as an obstacle to offering health insurance (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • 16% of employers said they think offering the best health benefits package is the biggest benefit-related priority (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • 1% of employers currently offering health insurance said they won’t be providing it in two-three years (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • 61% of benefits decision-makers said their company is aware of potential healthcare policy changes at the federal level (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • 39% of employers anticipate health insurance quality improving in the next one to three years (Transamerica Center for Health Studies)

  • The cost to provide health benefits could near $15,000 per worker by the beginning of 2019 (NBGH)

  • 39% of employees have a full understanding of their health insurance policy (Aflac)

  • Employees spend just 18 minutes on average enrolling in their benefits (PlanSource)

  • 19% of employees did not feel confident they understood everything they signed up for after their most recent benefits enrollment (Aflac)

  • 93% of employees choose the same benefits each year rather than making changes during open enrollment periods (Aflac)

  • 56% of employees spent less than a half hour researching their benefits options during the last open enrollment, including 19% who didn’t do any research at all (Aflac)

  • 52% of employees say they understand their health benefits and 43% indicate they understand their non-health benefits very/extremely well (EBRI)

  • 35% of employees either know nothing about or don’t fully understand their healthcare coverage, while another 33% don’t understand their medical bills (Maestro Health)

  • 62% of employees said their employer does not act as a resource for healthcare-related questions (Maestro Health)

  • 31% of employees indicate their employer or benefits company provides no education or advice on benefits (EBRI)

  • 39% of employees state that their employer provides education on how health insurance works, 24% say that their employer provides education n how a health savings account works, and 28% confirm that their employer offers education on how to invest money in their retirement plan (EBRI)

  • 75% of millennials, 75% of Gen S and 85% of baby boomers say they have a good understanding of employer benefit and savings plans and the role those plans play in their overall financial well-being (PwC)

  • 53% of small businesses are helping workers make better benefits decisions and 44% are increasing employee financial education over the next five years (Guardian)

  • 67% of employees report that their employers offered health insurance in 2017, up from 63% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 80% of “best in class” employers offer health insurance (Adecco)
  • 92% of employers said they are “very confident” their organization will continue to sponsor health benefits in five years (WTW)
  • 31% of workers rated healthcare as the top concern in America (EBRI)

  • 60% of employees said health coverage is extremely important in whether to stay in their job (EBRI)

  • 75% of employees are more likely to stay with their employer because of their health benefits plan (Liazon)
  • 71% of adults with employer-provided coverage are satisfied with their current health insurance plan, while 19% are dissatisfied and 9% say they have neither favorable nor unfavorable opinions (AHIP)

  • 52% of adults with employer-provided coverage say their premiums and deductibles are reasonable, while 41% say their premiums are unreasonable and 36% say their deductibles are unreasonable (AHIP)

  • When asked if they had a medical emergency and were required to go to the hospital, 75% of adults with employer-provided coverage say their coverage would protect them from the majority of their medical costs, while 25% do not have confidence their plan would adequately protect them (AHIP)

  • 71% of Americans are satisfied with their current employer-sponsored health plan (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 56% of Americans said their health plan is the reason they’ve stayed at their current job (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 71% of Americans worry that healthcare costs will continue to increase (America’s Health Insurance)

  • Comprehensive benefits ranked higher in importance among Americans (58%) than affordability of plans (42%) (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 46% of Americans said their health plan was either a deciding factor, or a positive influence, in the decision to take their current job (America’s Health Insurance)

  • Americans said the most important benefits are prescription drug coverage (51%), preventive healthcare (47%) and emergency services (47%) (America’s Health Insurance)

  • Personalized wellness programs, combined with a variety of non-cash incentives like paid time off, would motivate 80% of employees to be more engaged in employer programming (Welltok)

  • Almost one-third of workers said they would like their employer to assist more than they currently do with their financial health and planning; health care and prescription drug costs were a desired area of financial assistance for 34% of workers and the cost of housing was a top concern for 26% (NBGH)

  • About 27% of workers said they would like overall support for their mental health (NBGH)

  • About 25% of workers want resources to help them sleep better and be more resilient, and another two in five want assistance with burnout on the job (NBGH)

  • 59% of employees reported high levels of well-being when their employers provided access to health-enabling communities compared to those without such communities (28%) (NBGH)

  • 84% of employees said their company offers one-size-fits-all wellness programs, and 56% said they have received irrelevant support (Welltok)

  • More than 60% of employees want help from their employer for all facets of health, with financial health being their top priority (Welltok)

  • 35% of employees want student loan repayment and 27% want financial planning resources (Unum)

  • 64% of employees reported feeling stressed at work, but only one-third of employees reported employers offering stress management programs (Welltok)

  • 79% of employers say they offer wellness programs to improve absenteeism/presenteeism, 78% attract and retain talent, and 76% to improve and maintain employee morale (Optum)

  • Since 2016, the amount of employers that use health-related mobile apps rose 46% (Optum)

  • About 75% of employers reported health-related mobile apps assisted the increase in worker participation (Optum)

  • The amount of organizations reporting their well-being programs included the use of fitness or activity devices rose by almost 40% (Optum)

  • 84% of employers said they will augment their investment in women’s health services (Optum)

  • 78% of employers think their company can improve how they communicate about their wellness initiatives (Lifeworks)

  • 82% of workers expect employers to offer Health and Wellness plans (Accenture)

  • 82% of workers are dissatisfied with their employer’s wellness plans (Accenture)

  • 60% of employers want to reduce the scope of their offerings (Accenture)

  • Being covered by a health plan at work boosted the probability of women continuing to work full time by 8.5%, cut the likelihood that they’d resort instead to working part time (probably with no health coverage) by 5.7% and also reduced the probability of their retiring by 2.7% (Marco Angrisani; Erik Meijer; Maria Casanova)

  • 68% of employees said they think work perks are just as important as health coverage, life insurance, and other traditional benefits (Zenefits

  • Employees identified wellness programs as the most import perk followed by education programs, financial wellness programs, free meals or snacks and commuter benefits (Zenefits)

  • Although about one-third of U.S. employees participated in some form of financial wellness programming last year, many report struggling financially (Bank of America & Merrill Lynch)

  • Healthcare benefits (68%), paid family sick leave (54%) and flexible scheduling benefits (47%) are the most popular perks among Millennial employees (ReportLinker)
  • 37% of those 64 years old and under are connected to their plan on social media vs 7% of Medicare enrollees; of those who are connected, 65% of Medicare enrollees and 78% of the younger respondents say the connections are helpful (HealthMine)

  • 55% of employees whose companies offer health insurance say they would like help from their employer when choosing a health plan (Jellyvision)
  • 49% of employees say making health insurance decisions is always very stressful (Jellyvision)
  • 41% of employees can’t identify all of the elements that add up to the full cost of their health care (Jellyvision)
  • Employees spend 30 minutes or less reviewing benefits materials before open enrollment (Unum)

  • Workers said that signing up for benefits made them feel stressed (21%), confused (22%) and anxious (20%) (Unum)

  • 96% of employees said they were content with the enrollment and shopping experience for benefits (WTW)

  • Employee satisfaction with benefits rose to 95% in 2018 from 92% in 2016, while employer satisfaction with benefit offerings rose to 99% - a 22% increase from 77% in 2016 (WTW)

  • 41% of employees feel the open enrollment process at their company is extremely confusing (Jellyvision)
  • 73% of employees feel confident about health insurance details like deductible size, but only 53% know their out-of-pocket maximums and just 47% know their employer’s contributions (Jellyvision)
  • 24% of workers would pay more each month for services and tools that would help them live healthier lives and improve their financial situation (19%) (WTW)

  • 43% of workers said their benefits package gives them more choice and variety to meet their needs, and 27% believe their employer’s offerings help them manage their finances (WTW)

  • 85% of employees feel more engaged in their health care decisions (Liazon)
  • 63% of employees are not willing to spend at least an hour a day on health-related activities (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 38% of employees use online tools to shop for group or employer-sponsored insurance: up from 9.5% five years ago (Connecture)
  • 50% of employees have online access to benefits and less than 25% having access on their mobile device (Accenture)

  • 59% of employees wouldn’t spend more than one hour to research and choose their health plan; nearly 50% said they’re not sure what they pay in health care costs each month (Connecture)
  • 52% of employees are willing to bear more of the cost of their benefits in order to have a broader array of offerings that suit their personal needs (MetLife)
  • More than 60% of women say better health, dental and vision benefits would be taken into heavy consideration by women applicants compared to only 47% of men (Harvard Business Review)

  • 80% of employees would choose additional benefits over a pay raise (Harvard Business Review)

  • Just 6% of employees can successfully define four basic health insurance concepts: plan premium, deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximum (United Healthcare)
  • Healthcare consumers spend $25 billion each year on low-value health procedures that aren’t always necessary (VBID Health)

  • Dissatisfaction stems from employees’ need for additional benefits (57%), the desire for benefits they currently don’t have (24%), benefits they can’t use (22%) and benefits they feel pressured not to use (8%) (Clutch)

  • 38% of full-time employees don’t have a health insurance plan through their employer (Clutch)

  • 25% of employees lack health coverage (Clutch)

  • 44% of millennials (18-34) name health insurance as the most important benefit they receive (Clutch)

  • 62% of Generation X and baby boomers say health insurance is the most important benefit to receive (Clutch)

  • Employees now pay for about 43% of health care expenses (Milliman)
  • 62% of employers offer health care services such as diagnosis, treatment or prescriptions provided by phone or video, which is up 28% from last year (SHRM)

  • 3% of large self-insured employers contract directly with an accountable care organization for healthcare services (National Business Group on Health)

  • The cost of health care benefits is projected to rise 7.8% in 2017, an increase from 7.3% in 2016 (WTW)
  • From 2016 to 2017, health care costs increased for 79% of organizations, with an 11% increase on average (SHRM)
  • 38% of workers would pay more each month for a better healthcare plan, and 46% would be willing to spend more money for lower, more predictable healthcare costs (WTW)

  • 76% of employers are concerned about healthcare affordability, and 86% of that are trying to reduce costs (TCHS)

  • 97% of organizations are very or somewhat concerned about controlling healthcare costs (SHRM)
  • The $25,826 in healthcare costs for a typical family of four covered by an employer-sponsored preferred provider plan is $1,155 higher than last year (Milliman Medical Index)
  • Of that $25,826, employers pay $14,793, or 57% - a 4% decrease from 2001 (Milliman Medical Index)
  • Healthcare costs for active workers doubled from 2001 to 2015, from 5.7% to 11.5%  (WTW)
  • Healthcare expenses are expected to rise by 5.5% in 2018, up from a 4.6% increase in 2017 (WTW)
  • Employers spent on average 70% more on healthcare benefits than retirement benefits in 2015 (WTW)

  • Healthcare is costly across all industries, spanning from 10.4% of pay in the retail industry to 12.7% of pay in the oil, gas and electric industry (WTW)

  • Employers’ cost to provide employee benefits, measured as a percentage of pay, increased 24% between 2001 and 2015 (WTW)

  • The total cost of employer-provided benefits (health care, retirement, and postretirement medical) rose from 14.8% of pay in 2001 to 18.3% of pay in 2015, a jump of 24% (WTW)

  • Healthcare costs for active employees more than doubled, rising from 5.7% in 2001 to 11.5% of pay in 2015 (WTW)

  • In 2002, healthcare costs for active employees comprised about 42% of benefits, while retirement benefits made up the remaining 58%. But in 2015, healthcare benefits accounted for 64% and the retirement share accounted for 37% (WTW)

  • The average health care rate increase for midsize and large companies was 3.9% in 2017; the average healthcare cost increases for midsize and large companies will be 4.% after plan design changes and vendor negotiations in 2018 (Aon)
  • Average annual total costs per employee increased from $9,727 to $9,935 on employer-sponsored health plans (United Benefits Advisors)

  • The employee share of total costs rose 5% from $3,378 to $3,550, while the employer’s share rose less than 1%, from $6,350 to $6,401 on employer-sponsored health plans (United Benefits Advisors)

  • 12.8% of all plans are self-funded, up from 12.5% in 2016, while 60.9% of all large employer (1,000+ employees) plans are self-funded (United Benefits Advisors)

  • The average deductible for employer-sponsored health plans increased by 13% in 2016 (Colonial Life)
  • Large employers predict a 5% hike in medical and pharmacy benefits costs in 2018 for the fifth straight year in a row (NBGH)
  • 2017 estimated total healthcare costs is $13,482 per employee - expected to rise to $14,156 in 2018; employers' share of the cost will be 70% and employees will cover about 30%, or about $4,400 (NBGH)
  • 2018’s average healthcare cost increase for U.S. employees is projected to be 7.2%, up from 6.9% in 2017 (Aon)
  • 63% of employees with employer-sponsored insurance say they are concerned this open enrollment season about their plans’ out-of-pocket medical costs increasing in 2018 (Securian)

  • The average costs for health care, including employee premiums and out-of-pocket costs, are projected to be $5,248, up from $4,895 in 2017, and employee premium costs are projected to average $2,678 (Aon)
  • Costs for employer sponsored-medical plans in 2018 are likely to rise 8.4% (Aon)

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  • Premium renewal rates for employer-sponsored health insurance rose an average of 6.6% (United Benefit Advisors)

  • Average employee premiums for family coverage rose 3%, up to $1,272 from $1,236 (United Benefits Advisors)

  • Annual employer-sponsored health insurance premiums for family coverage rose by an average of 3% this year to $18,764 (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • While premium increases slowed, employee contributions (32%) have been growing faster than employers’ (14%) since 2010 (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • Workers at large companies now pay an average of $5,714 annually for health premiums, while workers in firms with fewer than 200 employees pay an average of $6,814 a year (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • Average deductibles remained stable at $1,221 (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average premium for single coverage increased by 4% to an annual total cost of $6,690 (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average annual premium for family coverage for covered workers in small firms ($17,615) is lower than the average premium for covered workers in large firms ($19,235) (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average annual premiums for covered workers in high-deductible health plans with savings options are lower for single coverage ($6,024) and family coverage ($17,581) than overall average premiums (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average premiums for covered workers enrolled in PPO plans are higher for single ($6,965) and family coverage ($19,481) than the overall plan average (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average premiums for covered workers vary across industries, with those in the retail industry being particularly low ($5,716 for single coverage and $16,920 for family coverage) (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average premiums for covered workers in firms with a relatively large share of younger workers (where at least 35% of the workers are age 26 or younger) are lower than the average premiums for covered workers in firms with a smaller share of younger workers ($5,922 vs. $6,762 for single coverage and $16,893 vs. $18,939 for family coverage) (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average premiums for covered workers in firms with a relatively large share of lower-wage workers (where at least 35% of workers earn $24,000 a year or less) are less than the average premiums at firms with a smaller share of lower-wage workers ($6,035 vs. $6,739 for single coverage and $16,376 vs $18,942 for family coverage) (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • The average premiums for covered workers in firms with at least some union workers are higher than the average premiums for covered workers in firms without union workers ($7,183 vs. $6,434 for single coverage and $19,885 vs $18,177 for family coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • 50% of firms with fewer than 50 employees provide coverage, down from 59% in 2012. Of the small firms that don’t offer health coverage, 44% cite the reason as the high cost, and 17% cited their small size as the cause (Kaiser Family Foundation)

  • Employees at small organizations pay an average of $3,557 annually for the cost of their coverage, with their employers paying $9,474 of the balance (United Benefits Advisors)
  • Employees at large companies pay $3,378 annually, while their organizations pay $9,727 (United Benefits Advisors)
  • Average out-of-pocket costs for employees are projected to be $2,570, 17% of the total health care cost (Aon)
  • More employers are offering supplemental health coverage, up 20% since 2015, to help workers pay for expenses not covered by their HDHP (Guardian)

  • 28% of employees with health insurance through work facing an out-of-pocket expense of $5,000 or more would use their personal savings to pay rather than other means, including an HSA (8%) or supplemental group insurance (7%) (Securian)
  • 21% of employees say they do not know how they would pay for an out-of-pocket expense (21%); 12% say they would need to rely on credit cards, 7% said a loan from their 401(k) (7%), 4% said they’d borrow from family/friends (4%), 2% would sell/pawn a personal possession (2%) (Securian)
  • 42% of workers say paying for out-of-pocket medical expenses would be the top financial concern when facing a debilitating injury; 58% say their top concern would be lost wages from work, the ability to pay for regular monthly expenses such as groceries, or the need to take on additional expenses such as lawn care or cleaning (Securian)
  • Employees will spend an average of $5,200 in health care costs next year (Aon)
  • Increases in employee contributions to the cost of premiums (48%) and higher cost sharing through plan design changes (48%) remain the top two health care cost-control tactics (AJG)
  • 85% of employers said that healthcare acquisitions will have moderate to significant changes on their plan-design strategies and employees’ access to health services in the future (Aon)

  • 14% of employers expect significant changes in how healthcare is accessed; 71% expect moderate changes and 15% see no real changes (Aon)

  • Some of the tactics employers expect to adopt to help control costs by 2019 include cost-transparency tools (24%) and healthcare decision support (19%) (AJG)
  • Overall cost increases of healthcare benefits will hold steady at 6% in 2017 (NGBH)
  • 34% of companies now offer healthcare coverage to part-time employees (SHRM)
  • Among part-time employees, 25% have medical insurance, 18% have dental insurance and 14% have disability insurance and only 13% have life insurance through their employer (Guardian Life)
  • 24% of part-time workers “feel good” that they could pay a $3,000 medical bill, compared to 34% of their full-time colleagues (Guardian Life)
  • 19% of employers (and 50% of large employers) use a specialty pharmacy benefit manager (AJG)
  • 62% of employers are currently evaluating pharmacy benefit contract terms, with another 32% planning to or considering to by 2019 (WTW)
  • 60% of employers recently adopted new coverage or utilization restrictions as part of specialty pharmacy strategy, with another 24% planning to or considering (WTW)
  • 44% address specialty drug costs and utilization performance through medical benefits, with another 38% planning to or considering (WTW)
  • 65% of companies offer personal health risk assessments; 71% cover second medical opinions; 54% cover biometric screenings; 48% cover lifestyle and health education (WTW)
  • Almost half of the nation’s employers offer workplace health or wellness programs (UNC)

  • 12% of workplaces offer comprehensive health promotion programs, which include supportive social and physical environments as well as health screenings with follow-up and education (UNC)

  • Among employers with 50 or more workers, about 17% offer comprehensive health promotion programs (UNC)

  • Three factors that were independent predictors of having a comprehensive health promotion program: at least one person was assigned responsibility for the program, a budget was allocated for the program and the employer had several years of experience with health promotion programming (UNC)

  • Workers rate the following valuable well-being communications they would like to have available (in order of importance): a financial well-being site; overall well-being site; financial well-being seminars; physical or mental well-being site; and physical and/or mental health seminars (Alight)

  • The most valuable specific well-being tools were retirement savings plan decision tools; health plan comparisons; cost clarity; spending and savings assistance; and provider choice tools (Alight)

  • The most valuable well-being programs were: Paid time off exchange; onsite health clinics; personalized support for navigating the health system; higher education support; 1:1 financial support; fitness reimbursement programs; and nutrition, healthy eating, weight management classes and programs (Alight)

  • 2.5 times more employees feel their well-being is going well if the programs are convenient (Alight)

  • 90% of employees described their organization’s well-being program as one of the top perks of employment (Stanford University)

  • 36% of employees want a gym membership or onsite fitness center, 18% want fitness goal incentives, 14% want health coaching, 28% want onsite healthy snacks (Unum)

  • 26% of U.S. workers favored incentives that reward healthy behavior, while 22% said the same of programs with fitness facilities (23%) (OfficeTeam)

  • 42% of employees said their employer offered a health and wellness program (Staples)

  • 41% of employees would take a 10% pay cut for a company that cared more about employee wellness (Staples)

  • 20% of companies don’t offer health and wellness programs (OfficeTeam)

  • 66% of HR managers say their organization’s health and wellness offerings have increased in the past five years (Robert Half)

  • 89% of employees think their organizations support their health and wellness goals (Robert Half)

  • Many employees felt food habits were an obstacle to health and wellness goals, including food at office celebrations (30%), snacks brought by coworkers (22%) and free meals (10%) (Robert Half)

  • 42% of employers said their wellness programs aim to improve employee engagement (Virgin Pulse)

  • Substance use disorders concern 84% of employers and nearly 90% of employers say they plan to address the stigma of mental health (Optum)

  • Workers rate the following mental health services they would likely use if offered by their employer through a third party (in order of importance): a stress management program to build resilience; referral to offsite, in-person mental health professional; onsite services with a mental health professional; onsite meditation or mindfulness class; telephonic, virtual or online visit with a mental health professional; mental health awareness campaign or other promotion to encourage awareness; and mental and emotional health application (Alight)

  • 72% of employers offered a program for mental health, and 85% of workers said the need for stress management was key in persuading them to participate (Virgin Pulse)

  • 35% of employees said employers would spend more on wellness programs in 2018, while just 15% stated they would decrease spending (Wellable)

  • 31% of employees take part in employer-sponsored wellness programs (Bank of America Merrill Lynch)

  • 38% of employees said they’re less than financially well, including 44% of those in the survey under age 40 (Bank of America Merrill Lynch)

  • 53% of employees said they had skipped important healthcare needs in order to save money (Bank of America Merrill Lynch)

  • 47% of women reported being less than financially well, compared to 29% of men (Bank of America Merrill Lynch)

  • Mental and/or physical health accounted for more than 84% of direct effects on productivity loss, as well as 93% of indirect influences (Vitality Group, Cambridge and Charles University)

  • 62% of participants in wellness programs say their productivity has improved, 56% have had fewer sick days and 30% say they had a disease detected thanks to these programs (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 67% of participants in wellness programs reported reduced bodyweight and 23% quit smoking or other nicotine use (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 84% of baby boomers show interest in a wellness program (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 46% of employees at companies offering 7-8 health and wellness program categories strongly agreed they are proud to be a part of the company, compared with only 14% of employees whose employer offered no programs (Optum)

  • 26% of employees at companies offering 7-8 health and wellness program categories strongly felt their employer takes a genuine interest in their well-being, compared with only 3% of employees whose employer offered 1-3 program categories (Optum)

  • 35% of employees at companies offering 7-8 health and wellness program categories said they were extremely likely to recommend their employer, compared to 14% of employees at companies offering 1-3 program categories (Optum)

  • 30% of employees who frequently participate in wellness programs strongly agreed their employer values them, while only 19% of workers who occasionally participate felt similarly (Optum)

  • 22% of employees who frequently participate in health and wellness programs strongly agreed that their employer makes healthy choices compared to just 6% of those who never participate (Optum)

  • Nearly half of workers who frequently participate in wellness programs report having a good relationship with co-workers (Optum)

  • 35% of employees frequently participating in wellness programs believed their employer promotes positive relationships among colleagues, yet only 23% of employees who don’t participate felt that way (Optum)

  • 29% of employees who frequently participate in health and wellness programs believe they are much better than coworkers at meeting or exceeding job requirements and deadlines, compared with 20% of those who never participate (Optum)

  • 30% of workers said their employer was helping their goal of getting fit and staying healthy through a benefits program (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 44% of professionals said they eat healthier when they work from home (Robert Half)

  • 87% of employers say they should be involved in encouraging workers to make healthier lifestyle changes, but only 54% of workers agree (WTW)

  • 68% of employees say their organization offers healthcare benefits (ReportLinker)
  • SMBs are contributing nearly 25% more than legally required to their employees’ monthly premiums, covering on average 73% of the total cost (Zenefits)
  • With a 49% adoption rate, PPOs are the most popular type of SMB benefits plan (Zenefits)
  • Employees in high deductible health plans grew by more than 60%, from roughly 50% in 2017 to 81% in 2018 (Benefitfocus)

  • HDHP offering rates have increased 76% in the West since 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees in the West made and received the highest HSA contributions, with employee contributions averaging $1,490 and employer contributions averaging $750 for individual plans, up 11% from 2017 and 19% from 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • HDHPs are most prevalent in the Midwest, where 70% of employers offer them alongside traditional health plans, up from 46% in 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • 37% of Midwestern employees selected an HDHP, the highest adoption rate in the country (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees in the Midwest play the lowest preferred provider organization premiums in the country, at less than $1,500 annually for single coverage (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees in the Northeast pay the most for their health plan premiums, both for PPOs ($1,692 for single coverage plans) and HDHPs ($1,237) (Benefitfocus)

  • The average employer HAS contribution (single coverage) has increased 10% year over year (Benefitfocus)

  • Southern workers carry higher-than-average financial responsibility for their health plans, paying the steepest PPO and HDHP deductibles in the country- $1,300 and $2,416 for single coverage; this is 28% higher than the nationwide average for PPOs and 11% higher than the nationwide average for HDHPS (Benefitfocus)

  • There’s been a 138% increase in the share of employers offering at least three voluntary benefits since 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees who select HDHPs earn 17% more than employees who choose preferred provider organization plans (Benefitfocus)
  • 29% of all insured employees were enrolled in HDHPs in 2016; up 9% since 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 20% more employers are offering at least one HDHP compared to 2016 (Benefit Focus)

  • 70% of employers offer PPO plans; 67% offer FSAs; 59% offer HSAs; 53% offer HDHPs (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 14% of the U.S. population is enrolled in a CDHP and 14% is enrolled in an HDHP (EBRI)
  • 50% of employees are not knowledgeable about HDHPs (Jellyvision)
  • The number of education industry employers offering HDHPs doubled to 44% over the past year (BenefitFocus)
  • 61% of manufacturers adopted HDHPs in 2017 (BenefitFocus)
  • HDHP adoption also increased 30% among retail employees over the past year (BenefitFocus)
  • HMOs account for 37% of enrollment choices in education (BenefitFocus)
  • 43% of employees with HSAs did not contribute any of their own money to them (WTW)

  • 73% of employers are offering an HSA paired with a high-deductible health plan (WTW)

  • 62% of employers are giving employees a head start by contributing seed money (WTW)

  • 83% of employers are expecting to offer HSAs associated with a high-deductible health plan by 2019 (WTW)

  • 88% of employers offer benefits to more employees than required by the ACA (Health e(fx))

  • The 2016 annual employer premium per enrolled employee who is not ACA eligible is $6,883 (Health e(fx))

  • Compared with Gen X and boomers, millennials were more likely to ask for a generic form of medicine (47%), manage healthcare expenses through a budget (35%) and check their plans to ensure coverage (57%) (EBRI)
  • 42% of employers are unsure of the prevalence of prescription drug addiction and substance abuse within their organizations (IFEBP)

  • 30% of employers have conducted claims analyses to gain insight into the extent of opioid abuse in their workplaces; 3% of these reported a significant increase in opioid-related claims from the year before and 8% reported such a change over the past five years (IFEBP)

  • 51% of businesses are using a prescription drug monitoring program or a pharmacy benefit manager to reduce the growing number of claims (IFEBP)

  • 26% of businesses are limiting the amount of pain pills given out to post-surgery patients and the same amount are offering alternative pain management treatments (IFEBP)

  • Nearly two-thirds of HR departments admitted they do not feel equipped to help colleagues addicted to opioids (The Hartford)

  • 65% of HR departments said the opioid epidemic has had some financial impact on their companies (The Hartford)

  • 59% of employees report that their employers offered dental insurance in 2017, up from 54% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 99% of organizations offer dental plans (WorldAtWork)
  • 82% of employees cite dental insurance as a very important employee benefit; 54% consider it a “must-have” (Lincoln Financial Group)
  • 54% of employees say they’d like their employer to provide a list of local in-network dentists, and 34% would appreciate ratings or rankings of in-network dentists  (Lincoln Financial Group)
  • 22% of employers offer a health savings account in 2017 (EBRI)

  • Employers are increasingly offering health savings accounts (HSAs), which increased by 125% from 2016-2018 (PlanSource)

  • HSA contributions to HSAs increased, with employers contributing $992 on average in 2018 and employees contributing $2,076 (PlanSource)

  • While 76% of employees say they understand HSAs, only 12% could correctly identify common attributes of the savings accounts (Bank of America)

  • Growth in HSA-eligible health plans has declined since 2007, from a high of 70% down to 12% and then to 0% in 2017 (EBRI)

  • Participation in health savings accounts (HSAs) rose to 81% in 2018 (Benefit Focus)

  • 25% of small employers (10-499 employees) and 61% of large employers (500+ employees) offered an HSA-eligible health plan in 2016 (EBRI)

  • By 2019, 34% of employers with 10-499 employees and 72% of employers with 500+ employees said they would be very likely to offer an HSA-eligible health plan (EBRI)

  • On average, individuals who made HSA contributions in 2016 contributed $1,986 over the year, and HSAs receiving employer contributions in 2016 received $935 (EBRI)

  • 13% of account holders contributed the fully allowable HSA annual amount (EBRI)

  • 67% of employers offer HSAs; 15% offer employee-funded Health Reimbursement Arrangements (CEB)
  • 75.3% of employers see HSAs as part of their retirement benefits strategy (Plan Sponsor Council of America)
  • The average per-employee cost of HSA-eligible plans is 13% less than that of a traditional PPO (Mercer)
  • 55% of organizations offered HSAs in 2017, and 36% provided an employer contribution to the HSA (SHRM)
  • 53% of large employers offer HSA plans, 6% position it as a full replacement for traditional medical coverage (Mercer)
  • At companies that offer HSAs, only 24% of covered employees enroll in one (Mercer)
  • 40% of eligible employees choose an HSA to which their employer contributes versus 35% when there is no employer contribution (Mercer)
  • 60% of plan sponsors believe HSAs should replace flexible spending accounts (Plan Sponsor Council of America)
  • 47% of employers said their employees weren’t aware of the tax advantages of HSAs, flexible spending accounts and similar savings vehicles (Mercer)
  • Fully paid medical insurance topped the list of perks that workers said they don’t have, but want, followed by a four-day work week and fully paid dental insurance (Zoro)

  • 65% of employees have $1,000 or less to pay unexpected out-of-pocket medical expenses (Aflac)
  • 44% of parents with employer-sponsored health insurance have had a child experience a major injury (Securian)

  • 10 years after an injury, the average worker received 88% of the earnings and income benefits that an uninjured worker would have received (WCRI)

  • 29% of employers say they are now collaborating with outside organizations to find opportunities to reduce employee costs (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 58% of workers would not be able to cover unexpected out-of-pocket medical costs of $1,000 or more, and 31% would not be able to cover an unexpected out-of-pocket medical bill greater than $500 (Aflac)

  • 5% of the employer-insured population generates 50% of healthcare costs, while 15% generates 80% of healthcare costs (Big Bang Health)
  • 84% of workers want help in getting disability insurance, compared with 71% of employers (Alight Solutions)

  • 88% of Americans think employers should offer disability insurance to protect their finances if they couldn’t earn a paycheck due to sickness or injury; 56% of workers say they’d even pay the full premium for disability coverage, but only 26% sign up for it (Unum)

  • Gen Xers and Boomers focus more on disability insurance (50% and 63%) vs their younger coworkers (33%) (LIMRA)

  • Although high use of preventive services cost 39% more than low preventive use during a six-year period, employers spend 86% less on major restorative services (Guardian Life)

  • 49% of employees report that their employers offered vision insurance in 2017, up from 44% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 34% of employees surveyed say they have disability insurance (OneAmerica)
  • Among employed Americans who do not have short- or long-term disability insurance provided by their employer, 43% say the reason is because their employer does not offer it (OneAmerica)
  • 23% of workers with a household income of less than $50,000 a year have employer-provided disability insurance (OneAmerica)
  • 34% of working women between 18 and 34 who lack disability insurance said they don’t have it because they think they are healthy and don’t need it (OneAmerica)
  • 50% of employees report that their employers offered life insurance in 2017, up from 47% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 81% of workers want help getting life insurance, while just 68% of employers think they should provide that help (Alight Solutions)

  • 45% of employed Americans report not having voluntary group life insurance provided by their employer (OneAmerica)

  • 45% of employed Americans claim to have voluntary group life insurance provided by their employer (OneAmerica)

  • 45% of employees who do not have voluntary group life insurance provided by their employer say their employer doesn’t offer it (OneAmerica)

  • Among those who don’t have voluntary group insurance provided by their employer, only 9% said they had other obligations, and 14% did not see the value in it (OneAmerica)

  • 83% of insurance brokers report that employers look to them to manage health care spending (DirectPath)
  • 78% of insurance brokers have added new products and services in the past year to help their clients control healthcare costs (DirectPath)
  • 30% of workers understand their Pharmacy benefit manger’s (PBM) contract details, 40% understand their PBM’s guarantee in performance and 63% said they don’t know how their PBM makes money (NPC)

  • Employers will select carriers vendors based on competitiveness of negotiated provider discounts (94%); competitiveness of vendor’s network access (94%); and competitiveness of vendor’s total cost of care (92%) (WTW)
  • 97% of employees who were able to stay on the job participated in a workplace resource program, but 47% of employees with a chronic medical condition weren’t referred to any workplace resource program (Standard Insurance Company)

  • 60% of employees who sought their direct supervisor’s assistance when combating a health condition at work were fearful of losing their job when reaching out (Standard Insurance Company)

  • Employees who worked with an HR manager on combating a health condition were able to return to work 44% faster than those who sought their supervisor’s help (Standard Insurance Company)

  • 81.9% of employees would feel comfortable asking their supervisor for time off for a physical medical issue, and just 16.9% would feel comfortable requesting time off for a mental health issue (TAO Connect)

  • 74% of working adults say their manager does encourage them to take time off when they need to take care of their health and wellness (Glassdoor)

  • 59% of employees had actually experienced a struggle with mental health in the workplace (TAO Connect)

  • 49% of employees feared their supervisor would judge them or treat them differently for needing time off for therapy (TAO Connect)

  • 96% of employers will use telehealth services (NBGH)
  • 78% of employers currently use telemedicine consultations, with another 16% planning to or considering to by 2019 (WTW)
  • Employer usage of telemedicine has gone up 171% since 2014 (Optum)

  • 56% of employers plan to offer telehealth for behavioral health services (NBGH)
  • 36% of large companies will offer high-touch concierge services in 2018, up from 28% in 2017 (NBGH)
  • New call-to-actionThe use of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) could increase 100% by 2020, and 54% of employers will provide onsite or near site health centers in 2018 (NBGH)
  • 77% of employers offer free or discounted flu shots (IFEBP)
  • 72% of Culture of Health (CoH) companies recognize wellness as important to their overall business strategy vs. just 11% of non-CoH companies (Optum)

  • 60% of companies offer wellness programs to stay competitive when attracting and retaining employees vs. 14% of those companies with no identified culture of health (Optum)

  • 66% of Culture of Health employers believe wellness programs foster employee productivity compared to 18% of their counterparts (Optum)

  • 61% of companies plan to increase their wellness budget over the next three years (Optum)

  • 95% of Culture of Health employers take advantage of these tools, just 55% of non-CoH companies do (Optum)

  • 99% of Culture of Health companies offer incentives, averaging $585 per year vs. 89% of non-CoH companies offering an average incentive of $485 per year (Optum)

  • Culture of Health employers believe their programs have made employees more confident in their health care navigation skills (64% vs. 11% of non-CoH companies) (Optum)

  • 39% of employers throughout the world are now offering wellness or well-being programs (WTW)
  • The percentage of employers offering wellness programs rose to 66% over last year’s rate of 55% (TCHS)

  • 78% of employers believe wellness programs have positively affected employees (TCHS)

  • 56% of employers believe their wellness programs have encouraged employees to live a healthier lifestyle, but only 32% of employees agree (WTW)

  • 46% of employees say they would participate in health and wellness programs only if offered incentives (WTW)

  • 40% of workers said their employer offers a wellness program (TCHS)

  • 62% of employers say they provide wellness programs, but only 40% of employees say their organizations offer them (Transamerica Center)

  • 59% of companies offer a general wellness program (SHRM)
  • 10% of employees are not sure if their employer offers wellness benefits (CareerBuilder)

  • 33% of organizations said they are very likely to offer wellness benefits (MetLife)
  • 70% of employers are investing in wellness programs (United Healthcare)
  • 73% of employees say they are interested in wellness programs (United Healthcare)
  • 59% of employees said that health and wellness benefits are important for increasing loyalty (MetLife)
  • 36% of employers said wellness benefits and financial planning programs are valuable to their employees (MetLife)
  • 18% of employers are looking to enhance wellness and preventative health programs (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 90% of benefits consultants say that their clients are shifting to a total well-being approach over physical health programs (ShortLister)
  • 73% of benefits consultants are prioritizing wellness/well-being as a business objective (ShortLister)
  • 16% of employers rely on health plan vendors to administer wellness programs and 14% enlist the expertise of an outsourced wellness vendor, including 24% of large employers (AJG)
  • 57% of benefits consultants are staying with the same wellness vendor, 34% are moving to a new one (ShortLister)
  • 59% of employees say they exercise on a regular basis (CareerBuilder)
  • 22% of U.S. workers who regularly work out four or more days a week say they lost weight at their present job (CareerBuilder)
  • 41% of workers don't work out regularly or at all, and 47% of this group say they gained weight at their current job (CareerBuilder)
  • 30% of workers say their company provides gym passes, workout facilities or wellness benefits, but 19% of this group don’t take advantage of them (CareerBuilder)

  • 33% of employers say they are very likely to offer wellness benefits (MetLife)
  • 54% of benefits professionals cite employee morale as their most improved metric from implementing wellness programs (HUB)
  • 61% of workers say their employers do not offer wellness benefits, but if offered, 37% believe they would take advantage of them (CareerBuilder)

  • About 80% of U.S. workers gave their jobs’ day-to-day tasks, work-life balance, company morale and benefits packages a letter grade of B- (Kforce)

  • Women gave their jobs one letter grade lower than med did when asked to rate their organizations’ potential for internal growth, company morale and benefits (Kforce)

  • According to employers, the main goals of wellness programs are reducing health costs (60% of companies), investing in culture (43%), and improving employee experience and satisfaction (37%) (AJG)
  • Personal coaching drives as much as 70% of medical cost savings in wellness programs (HealthFitness)
  • 70% of HR pros expressed an interest in allowing employees dealing with addiction to take a break from work to receive treatment and helping them transition back to their position after completing rehab (National Safety Council)
  • 72% of Millennials say wellness initiatives are the best way for their employers to help relieve stress (Udemy)
  • Workplace stress accounts for as much as $190 billion in healthcare costs (Udemy)

  • Of those who missed work due to stress, 35% missed 3-5 days a month, 38% missed six days or more, and 14% stayed away for between 21-30+ days (Mental Health America)

  • 50% of all U.S. employees have experienced a mental health problem themselves or with a family member in the past year, yet employees waited an average of three weeks to see a service provider in their initial search for help (Consumer Medical)

  • Ease of access was the top motivator for those who took advantage of their employers’ behavioral health benefits (Ginger)

  • 91% of workers think their employer should be concerned about their emotional well-being, and 85% said access to behavioral health benefits is a major consideration in evaluating new job options (Ginger)

  • One in five workers wasn’t satisfied with the behavioral health provider they selected (Consumer Medical)

  • More than 76% of employees are confident their managers were properly trained on how to identify employees who may be having a mental health issue, while only 16% of HR professionals agreed (ThriveMap)

  • 55% of employees said their employer didn’t have a specific mental health policy or program in place (ThriveMap)

  • Almost half of employees polled said that searching for a qualified mental health service provider distracted them on the job (Consumer Medical)

  • One in five employees didn’t find their employee assistance program useful (Consumer Medical)

  • 72% of workers with mental health issues said their condition lowered their productivity (Consumer Medical)

  • In mentally healthy organizations, 52% of employees enjoyed flexible work arrangements, 75% reported open door and relaxed work environments, and 69% were offered professional development opportunities (Mental Health America)

  • Two-thirds of workers believe their job is having a significant impact on their mental and behavioral health (Mental Health America)

  • 95% of employees want healthcare packages that include mental health (Businessolver)
  • 80% of employees believe employers have a responsibility to keep employees mentally and physically well (Staples)

  • When leaders recognized employees’ healthy actions and outcomes, there was more improvement in population health (91%) and medical plan cost (87%) than in companies that didn’t recognize employees’ success (HERO & Mercer)

  • Organizations whose leaders actively participated in health and well-being programs reported higher rates of employee satisfaction with health and well-being programs (83%) and employee perception of organizational support (85%) than organizations whose leaders didn’t actively participate (HERO & Mercer)

  • 56% of organizations have a formal, written strategic plan for well-being and report better outcomes on medical trends and health improvement than organizations that lack such plans (HERO & Mercer)

  • 57% of people say that if their employer proactively supported their mental wellbeing, it would help them to feel more loyal, be more productive and take less time off work (Health Shield)

  • 50% of employees would most appreciate access to face-to-face counseling to help support any mental health issues they are dealing with (Health Shield)

  • 23% of workers say they have access to a dedicated wellness room in their place of work (Staples)
  • 16% of employers were willing to not know the anticipated ROI, while 34% felt they could offer the benefit without knowing the ROI (Ernst & Young)

  • 54.6% of workplace wellness programs are described as metrics-driven (Fitbit)

  • 7.6% of employers are planning on investing in health analytics software in the next year and 16% of programs already make real-time analytics data available to leadership (Fitbit)

  • Among employers offering and measuring their wellness efforts, 50% have found a decrease in absenteeism, 63% are experiencing financial sustainability and growth, 66% reported increased productivity and 67% said employees are more satisfied (IFEBP)
  • Sleep disorders and sleep deprivation cost employers with 1,000 workers $1.4 million annually in absenteeism, decreased productivity and healthcare expenses (National Safety Council)

  • One worker with obstructive sleep apnea could cost an employer more than $3,000 in additional healthcare expenses a year (National Safety Council)

  • 71% of employers believe their culture focuses on improving overall well-being (LifeWorks)

  • Nearly 20% of 24-35 year olds said reputation for ethical behavior, diversity and inclusion as well as workplace wellbeing were important when choosing an employer (Deloitte)

  • 66% of employers plan to increase their support for financial well-being, compared to the current level of 16% (WTW)

  • 18% of organizations offer financial planning programs (MetLife)
  • 51% of wellness programs address financial health, up from 38% in 2015 (Optum)
  • 91% of employers plan to develop or expand their financial well-being programs (Alight)

  • 34% of wellness programs cover financial wellbeing; 28% cover volunteer opportunities and 27% include community engagement (AJG)
  • 58% of employers have a tool available that covers at least one aspect of financial wellbeing, that percentage is expected to reach 84% by the end of 2017 (Aon Hewitt)
  • 60% of employers say the importance of employee financial wellness has increased over the past two years (Aon Hewitt)
  • 49% of employers hope to improve social well-being, up from the current level of 12% (WTW)

  • 47%  of wellness programs address employees’ social health, compared to 37% in 2015; 68% address behavioral health, up from 65% in 2015 (Optum)
  • The most common wellness benefit is providing resources and information (71% of companies), and 62% give wellness tips or information at least quarterly in the form of a newsletter, e-mail, column or tweets (SHRM)
  • 26% of employees have access to a corporate wellness programs, 63% don’t use them (CareerBuilder)
  • 85% of employees with access to a wellness program say they are “somewhat aware” or “very aware” of the details of the program (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 59% of employees with access to a workplace wellness program credit it with improving their health (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 73% of employees are interested in workplace wellness programs (UnitedHealthcare)
  • The number of insurance plans that offer wellness incentives rose to 58% from 50% between 2016 and 2017 (DirectPath)
  • 19% of employers offer gym/fitness membership (ReportLinker)
  • 19% of employers currently encourage the use of mobile apps for condition management or health risk reduction to their employees, with another 28% planning to or considering (WTW)
  • 26% of employers currently promote wearable devices for tracking physical activity, with another 18% planning to or considering (WTW)
  • 30% of companies will offer subsidies or discounts on wearables (Fidelity)
  • Among employees without an activity tracker, 62% said they would be interested in using a wearable fitness tracker as part of a workplace wellness program (UnitedHealthcare)
  • 51% of employers offer price comparison tools, 18% plan to add similar tools in the next three years (CEB)
  • 81% of employers believe their well-being initiatives meet their employees’ needs, while only 66% of employees agree (WTW)

  • 84% of employers plan to improve employees’ physical well-being over the next three years, up from the current level of 27% (WTW)

  • 74% of businesses with holistic wellness programs said employee satisfaction increased (Virgin Pulse)
  • 78% of the businesses say employee wellbeing is a critical part of their business plans (Virgin Pulse)
  • According to employees, the most appealing incentives for wellness program participation are health insurance premium reductions (77%), grocery vouchers (64%) and health savings accounts (62%) (United Healthcare)
  • 95% of employers offer wellness incentives to their employees; 74% offer incentives to family members (Optum)
  • 27% of employers are now offering healthy lifestyle and wellness incentives (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 56% of employees believe they are overweight, and 45% believe they've gained weight at their present job (CareerBuilder)
  • 65% of companies offer personal health risk assessments, 71% offer second medical opinions, 54% offer biometric screenings, 48% offer llifestyle and health education (WTW)
  • 66% of companies will offer medical decision support and second opinion services in 2018 (NBGH)
  • 18% of employers currently offer financial planning programs (MetLife)
  • 84% of companies polled now include employee financial security in their wellness programs (NBGH)
  • 84% of companies say they now have financial security programs — such as access to debt management tools or student loan counseling (Fidelity)
  • 64% of women ranked meeting daily livings costs and paying off debt (57%) as their top financial priorities (WTW)

  • 95% of employers view their financial wellness programs as being effective in reaching company goals, with 7% saying that they help improve the bottom line (Bank of America/Merrill Lynch)

  • 83% of employers offer financial wellness programs, up from 20% two years earlier (Prudential)

  • 14% of employers say they plan to offer financial wellness programs in the next one or two years (Prudential)

  • One-third of employees participate in financial wellness programs despite the fact that many say they are struggling (Bank of America)

  • 81% of employees say they prefer that financial wellness be offered as a bundled program rather than as stand-alone resources (Bank of America)

  • Only 7% of employees identify healthcare as an important building block of financial wellness, yet 53% have skipped or postponed at least one healthcare need to save money (Bank of America)

  • 23% of employers are planning to add a financial wellness program in 2018 (Castlight Health)

  • 52% of employers said that they have implemented, or are considering implementing, a financial wellness program (Charles Schwab)
  • Employees who are engaged with their financial wellness program are likely to stay at the company (56%), stay or become healthy (50%) and remain productive in the office (45%) (Ernst & Young)

  • 44% of employers believe that a financial wellness program is becoming a “must-have” benefit in order for them to be competitive (Charles Schwab)
  • 76% of millennials, 68% of gen x and 57% of baby boomers say they’ve used the services their employer provides to assist them with their personal finances (PwC)

  • 44% of employees say their employer financial wellness program has helped them get their spending under control, better manage healthcare expenses/save for future healthcare expenses (13%), better manage investments (26%), prepare for retirement (44%), save more for major goals (35%) and pay off debt (33%) (PwC)

  • 59% of employers said the best way to structure financial wellness programs is to integrate the offering with the rest of the employee benefits package (Charles Schwab)
  • 37% of employers expressed concern over the potential cost of implementing a financial wellness program (Charles Schwab)
  • 71% of companies expect to offer tools and resources to support emergency savings, debt management and budgeting (Fidelity)
  • 75% of employers offer wellness initiatives primarily to improve overall worker health and well-being (IFEBP)

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  • Organizations that update their benefits programs are 60% more likely to offer wellbeing initiatives (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 77% of organizations indicated their wellness program was somewhat or very effective in reducing healthcare costs (SHRM)
  • 88% of organizations rated their wellness initiatives as somewhat or very effective in improving employees’ health (SHRM)
  • 92% of workplaces offering wellness programs and tracking wellness ROI report their initiatives as very or somewhat successful (IFEBP)
  • 19% of organizations have added a smoking surcharge to the cost of health care premiums (SHRM)
  • 22% of survey participants currently have mindfulness programs and 21% are thinking about introducing one in 2017 (National Business Group on Health)
  • The number of employers using private exchanges for employee benefits rose 144% between June 2015 through the end of December 2016 (Employee Benefits Adviser)
  • 97% of employers said they were satisfied with their experience using a private marketplace (WTW)
  • 86% of employers say the marketplace has helped them control benefit costs (W TW)
  • 85% of employees using exchange marketplaces reported that they are “more aware” of the cost of medical care compared to their pre-exchange experience (WTW)
  • 61% of employees rank their health as more important than their wealth or career (Mercer)
  • 47% of employees expect their workplace to become more focused on employee health in the next few years (Mercer)

Retirement Benefits Stats

  • The average worker wants to retire by age 62, 18-24 year old workers plan to retire at 56, and workers ages 55-65 see themselves retiring at 67 (Monster)

  • One-third of American workers think they will struggle with their finances in retirement or they will never be able to retire (Natixis)

  • The preferred retirement age range was 60-69 for 71% of the 55-65 year old workers (Monster)

  • Retirement benefits tied with affordable health plans as the 2nd most preferred benefit across all age groups (Monster)

  • 72% of employers think workers don’t think about retirement until their retirement draws near and only 40% of workers reported that this is true (TCRS)

  • More than half of workers feel confident in how much they have saved for retirement, but 25% of those added that this confidence depends on social security (Paychex)

  • 72% of employers think that offering a 401k or a similar retirement plan is important in attracting and retaining workers, while 81% of employees said retirement benefits make up a major portion of job search (TCRS)

  • 66% of workers would like more help from employers in reaching their retirement goals, only 52% of employers believe that to be the case (TCRS)

  • 81% of employees say that retirement benefits make up a major portion of a job search (TCRS)

  • 75% of employees wanted help calculating how much to save for a secure retirement, how much to anticipate spending each month in retirement (72%) and planning for health care expenses in retirement (72%) (EBRI)

  • 66% of workers would like more help from employers in reaching their retirement goals, but only 52% of employers believe that to be the case (TCRS)

  • The most popular retirement benefit among older Americans is the traditional pension, collected by 56% of households 65 and older (US Census)
  • 69% say a firm’s pension scheme is an important factor when looking for a new job (CBI)

  • 47% of businesses believe that recent pension freedoms have led to employees being more engaged (CBI)

  • Employees aged 50+ are almost twice as likely as those under 34 to be engaged in their pension (87% vs 48%) (CBI)

  • Workers on a higher wage (87%) are significantly more engaged in their pension than those on lower wages (33%) (CBI)

  • 70% of employees of more than ten years are engaged with their pension (CBI)

  • 66% of firms believe educating staff about the benefits of saving through workplace pensions can help influence employee engagement on pensions, wider financial education (58%), the use of simpler language and minimal jargon in pension communication (63%), technology (54%), and individualizing pension communications as far as possible (49%) (CBI)

  • 63% of businesses include pensions in an employee’s induction process, 60% include guidance from an external provider, 54% a sign-post staff to publicly available pension guidance, 51% offer a digital information portal for staff and 49% deliver in-house webinars/seminars (CBI)

  • 66% of workers would make higher monthly payments for more generous retirement benefits, and 61% would exchange more pay for a guaranteed retirement benefit (WTW)

  • 59% of workers think their retirement plan meets their needs, and 66% believe their healthcare plan meets their needs (WTW)

  • More than 60% of global employees rely on employer sponsored plans as the primary means of saving for retirement (WTW)

  • Three in five workers would rather pay for a more generous retirement benefit than a better health plan (WTW)

  • 53% of workers ages 60+ say they are postponing retirement, with 57% of men putting retirement on hold compared to 48% of women (CareerBuilder)

  • 40% of workers don’t think they’ll be able to retire until 70 or older (CareerBuilder)

  • 36% of employers say their employees are only a little bit or not at all prepared for retirement once they reach retirement age (IFEBP)

  • 24% of employees do not know how much they will need to save for retirement, and women are much more likely to be unsure of how much to save than men (31% vs. 17%)(CareerBuilder)

  • 20% of workers think they’ll need to save less than $500,000 in order to retire, 31% said $500,000 to less than $1 million, 14% said $1 million to less than $2 million, 5% said $2 million to less than $3 million, and 7% said $3 million or more (CareerBuilder)

  • 23% of workers ages 55+ and 40% of ages 18-34 said they don’t participate in a 401(k), IRA or other retirement plan (CareerBuilder)

  • 67% of workers in the South and 69% in the Midwest contribute to retirement accounts, compared to 73% in the Northeast and 71% in the West (CareerBuilder)

  • After a PTO bank, the most common benefits to which workers had access were a 401(k), free coffee and partially paid medical insurance (Zoro)

  • 66% of “best in class” employers offer 401(k) plans (Adecco)
  • Employers' 401k contributions rose to 4.7% of workers' wages in 2016, up from 3.9% in 2015 (Wall Street Journal)
  • 76.77% of employees participate in a 401(K) or other retirement savings program at work; 11.1% don’t participate because they choose not to; 10.3% don’t participate because their employer does not offer one; 1.82% say they do not know what a 401(K) or retirement savings program is (APA)

  • 2% of organizations let workers put the cash value of unused time off into their 401(k), and 2% let them convert time to a donation for a not-for-profit organization (WorldatWork)

  • 70% of workers want personalized investment advice for 401(k) plans (Charles Schwab)
  • 70% of employers added Roth features to their 401k plans, up from 54% in 2014 (WTW)

  • 86% of people want to retire at or before 65, but only 37% believe this to be an option (Cebr)

  • 20% of people believe they will never be able to retire due to poor financial planning (Cebr)

  • 68% of workers want comprehensive financial planning to help them plan for healthcare costs in retirement and figure out how much they need to save for their post-work years (EBRI)

  • 80% of defined contribution plan participants say they would be very or somewhat interested in an investment option that guarantees income for life when they retire (EBRI)

  • 35% of workers that make under $25,000 a year were confident they would have a secure retirement (EBRI)

  • 17% of American workers say they are very confident in their ability to live comfortably throughout retirement (EBRI)

  • 68% of workers expect income from working to be either a major or a minor source of income in retirement, but just 26% of retirees say that this income is a major or minor source (EBRI)

  • 36% of workers expect Social Security to be a major source of retirement income, but 67% of retirees report that Social Security is a major source of income in retirement (EBRI)

  • 46% of workers reported they were very or somewhat confident in Medicare this year, down from 52% in 2017, while 45% were very or somewhat confident in Social Security, down from 51% in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 81% of workers say they expect that a workplace retirement savings plan will be a major or minor source of income, but only 52% of retirees report that a savings plan is a significant source of income for them (EBRI)

  • 76% of workers with a defined contribution plan are at least somewhat confident in their ability to live comfortably in retirement vs. 46% of those without a defined contribution plan (EBRI)

  • 45% of employers said that they would relish their employees working into their eighties (Cebr)

  • 50% of employees over 55 and 59% of those ages 18-34 believe their employers should be doing more to guarantee their financial stability in retirement (Cebr)

  • 88% of employees say bosses should provide help saving for retirement, compared with 84% of employers (Alight Solutions)

  • 53% of employees reported they receive absolutely no advice on their retirement investments (Betterment for Business)

  • 57% of employees report that their employers offered a retirement savings plan in 2017, up from 53% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 78% of employers want to improve their efforts to educate employees about retirement plans, with 64% planning to offer guidance on how to draw down balances after employees retire (WTW)

  • 15% of employers say they are satisfied with their workers’ current savings rate in programs such as 401k(s) (Aon Hewitt)
  • 60% of savers and 53% of nonsavers who have at one time contributed to a 401(k) say their 401(k) is their largest or only source of retirement savings (Charles Schwab)
  • 82% of millennials are investing in a retirement savings vehicle, more than Gen X (77%) and baby boomers (75%) (BoA Merrill Lynch)
  • 90% of men think their employer’s contribution to their retirement plan is good vs 77% of women (Businessolver)

  • 97% of auto-enrolled employees don’t opt out of retirement programs (BoA Merrill Lynch)
  • 72% of employers believe that many of their employees expect to work past age 65 or do not plan to retire (Transamerica)
  • 63% of working adults say they plan to work past retirement age, but on a part-time basis; 11% say they will work full time (Gallup)
  • 69% of employers believe most of their employees could work to age 65 and not save enough to meet their retirement needs (Transamerica)
  • 27% of employers encourage workers to participate in succession planning, training and mentoring as they approach retirement (Transamerica)
  • 70% of workers cite travel as a retirement dream, 57% want to spend more time with family and friends, while 50% are looking forward to hobbies (Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies)

  • 35% of employers measure the retirement readiness of their participants annually, and 88% only measure basic plan statistics (WTW)

  • Of 78% of employers that offer a retirement program, only 37% take steps to measure employee retirement readiness (AJG)
  • Two-thirds of millennials had not saved a single dollar for retirement savings (NIRS)

  • 33% of part-time employees have an employer-sponsored retirement plan compared to 69% of fulltime employees (Guardian Life)
  • 33% of part-timers “feel good” that they are saving for retirement; 41% of full-timers agree (Guardian Life)
  • 15% of pre-retirees say their retirement savings are ahead of schedule, and 51% saying they’re behind schedule (Society of Actuaries)

  • 39% of employers offer pre-retirees flexible schedules, 31%  enable them to shift from full time to part time, 27% allow them to take on positions that are less stressful or demanding (Transamerica)
  • 71% of employers consider themselves to be “aging-friendly” by offering opportunities, work arrangements, and training and tools needed for employees of all ages (Transamerica)
  • 59% of employers cite negative perceptions of employees 50 years old and older, including higher healthcare costs (35%), higher wages and salaries (29%), and higher disability costs (15%) (Transamerica)
  • 45% of those who are not saving for retirement say they either have no money left over or are actually behind on bills at the end of each month; 23% of savers say the same (Charles Schwab)
  • 42% of those who are not saving for retirement say keeping up with monthly expenses is a significant source of stress; 20% of savers agree (Charles Schwab)
  • Among those actively saving for retirement, 66% say they’ve increased their contribution percentage in the past two years; 62% say they believe they are saving enough to retire when they want to (Charles Schwab)
  • 92% of employees participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan; 77% contribute enough to earn the full employer match (Financial Finesse)
  • 62% of employers surveyed see increased participation in retirement programs as the biggest measure of financial wellness program success (Charles Schwab)
  • 48% of plan sponsors have a formal metric system to track how prepared workers are for retirement (T. Rowe Price)
  • Employers with a metric tracking system had higher plan participation rates (63%) than those without (52%) (T. Rowe Price)
  • 51% of workers indicate that they don’t factor retirement into their long-term financial goals (Country Financial)
  • 31% of private-sector employees were not at all familiar with their retirement plan’s fees (Pew)

  • 90% of employers are concerned with their employees’ level of understanding about how much they need to save to achieve an adequate retirement savings (Aon Hewitt)
  • Retirement plan participation has increased 19% in the past five years (Wells Fargo)
  • 47% of workers are confident they’ll have sufficient resources 25 years into retirement (WTW)

  • 57% of workers are confident they’ll have enough resources 15 years in retirement (WTW)

  • Boomers have saved $164,000 (estimated median) in all household retirement accounts, Gen X has saved $72,000, and millennials have saved $37,000 (Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies)

  • 78% of millennials are on track to replace 80% of their pay in retirement, compared to 62% for Generation X and 50% for baby boomers (Wells Fargo)
  • 47% of Millennials are afraid they won’t be able to meet their families’ basic financial needs when they retire (Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies)

  • 76% of all workers are concerned that Social Security will not be there for them when they are ready to retire (Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies)

  • 79% of workers believe their generation will have a much harder time achieving financial security in retirement compared to their parents’ generation (Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies)

  • 30% of young workers sign themselves up for 401(k) plans (over 50% of workers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and early 60s voluntarily take this step) (T. Rowe Price)
  • 18% of millennials are confident they will have a secure retirement (TransAmerica)
  • 60% of Millennials would forgo some of their pay if it meant a more secure retirement (WTW)
  • 74% of consumers say an HSA is part of their retirement strategy (LIMRA)

  • Millennial parents (ages 18-34) contribute a median of 10% of their annual income to their retirement savings vs. Gen X parents (ages 35-54) with a median of 8% and Baby Boomer parents (ages 55+) with 5% (NerdWallet)

  • Among employed parents currently contributing a percentage of their income to retirement savings, 38% of millennials say they’re socking away more than 15% of their income vs. 24% of Gen X and 23% of Baby Boomers (NerdWallet)

  • 45% of millennial parents currently contributing to retirement savings say they save more than 10% of their annual income (NerdWallet)

  • 84% of employed parents say they’re currently contributing a percentage of their annual income to their retirement savings vs. 69% of nonparents (NerdWallet)

  • Parents are also more likely than nonparents to describe saving for retirement as a priority (60% vs. 49%) (NerdWallet)

  • 20% of employers said they were considering accelerating contributions to defined benefit plans (WTW)

  • 98% of organizations offer defined contribution plans (WorldAtWork)
  • 80% of employers offer HSAs and 12% are planning or considering adding them by next year (WTW)

  • Of the 25% of employers who increased their matching contribution during the past five years, 51% did so to encourage employees’ savings and engagement, and 44% did it to offset defined contribution plan changes (WTW)

  • 73% of employers offer auto-enrollment in defined contribution plans and 47% found the enhancement too costly (WTW)

  • Across two-thirds of businesses, only 5% or less of eligible workers have opted out of Auto Enrollment (CBI)

  • 91% of workers say it is important to know their retirement plan investments have been made with their best interests in consideration (LIMRA)
  • 77% of employees appreciate being able to take a loan from their retirement plan in case of an emergency (LIMRA)
  • 29% of workers have taken a loan, early withdrawal, and/or hardship withdrawal from a 401(k) or similar plan (Transamerica Center of Retirement Studies)

  • 10% of workers have taken a loan from their 401(k) plan, while 6% have made a permanent hardship withdrawal from their plan (WTW)

  • 60% of workers 50 years old and older are worried that something may delay their retirement (Investopedia)
  • Only 10% of women are very confident they’ll be able to retire comfortable (Transamerica)
  • 60% of working men and 44% of working women ranked saving for retirement as their top financial priority (WTW)

  • Married women without any children under age of 18 ranked saving for retirement as their umber one financial priority (WTW)

  • Retirement security is becoming a much more important issue for all employees, jumping from 52% in 2013 to 78% in 2018 (WTW)

  • While retirement security has become a heightened issue for Baby Boomers (87%), it remains a key issue for Millennial employees (71%) (WTW)

  • 39% of women are now confident they’ll have enough resources to last 25 years into retirement compared with 54% of men (WTW)

  • 37% of workers expect to work past age 70, an increase from 30% 2 years ago (WTW)

  • 26% of workers say they will be able to retire before age 65, down from 29% in 2015 (WTW)

  • Two-thirds of struggling employees who are age 50 or older today don’t expect to be able to retire before age 70 (WTW)

  • 74% of workers believe their generation is likely to be much worse off in retirement than their parents’ generation (WTW)

  • 68% of workers believe social security will be much less when they retire than it is now and government medical benefits (66%) will be worse (WTW)

  • 50% of workers plan to retire from their main job but will keep working for some time before fully retiring (WTW)

  • 72% of plan sponsors are satisfied with their retirement advisors (Fidelity Investments)
  • 87% of companies use an advisor or plan consultant (Fidelity Investments)
  • 88% of companies said they have employees who put off retirement because they haven't saved enough (Fidelity Investments)
  • 69% of small business owners don’t feel fully prepared for retirement (Paychex)

  • 59% of small business owners don’t think they can afford a retirement plan (Paychex)

  • 44% of small business owners don’t see the need or benefit to offering a retirement plan (Paychex)

  • 83% of millennials plan to work into retirement (Merrill Edge)
  • 64% of non-profits are worried employees will delay retirement because they do not have enough money (TIAA)
  • About 60% of Americans age 60+ said people continuing to work past the previous retirement age has been a good thing for the economy, compared with 30% of Americans under 30 years old (Associated Press)

PTO, Vacation and Time Off Stats

  • 56% of employees say additional PTO would make them more loyal to an organization (Fierce)
  • 37% of employees do not use all of their PTO each year (WorldatWork)

  • 58% of employees want paid family leave, 38% sabbatical leave, and 12% want dedicated volunteer hours (Unum)

  • 22% of employers offer paid time off for volunteering, 20% offer paid time off to serve on the board of a community group or professional association, and 42% offer community volunteer programs (SHRM)

  • Organizations with use it or lose it policies had only 19% of employees lose paid time off (WorldatWork)

  • 22% of workers were able to negotiate their vacation time and agreed that “The vacation policy is why I work here.” (Monster)

  • 32% of workers tried to negotiate for more time but were unsuccessful, and 21.3% were just happy to get hired (Monster)

  • Employees who say they very often or always experience burnout at work are 63% more likely to take a sick day, 23% more likely to visit the emergency room, 2.6 times as likely to leave their current employer, and 13% less confident in their performance (O.C. Tanner)

  • 52% of organizations said they allow immediate use of vacation time benefits, while 63% allow for immediate use of pooled vacation, sick and personal time (WorldatWork)

  • 25% of employers said their employees can redirect unused PTO to colleagues who need it (WorldatWork)

  • Almost 76% of employees said they would rather have an extra week of PTO than company memorabilia, and 61% would even give up discounts at other businesses (Zoro)

  • Nearly 30% of companies disclosed a paid time off policy, but doing so did not generate an ROE advantage (JUST Capital)

  • 9% of employees said more paid time off would most improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 63% of employees wouldn’t consider a job opportunity that offered fewer than 15 paid vacation days (Randstad)

  • Employees plan to take an average of 10 vacation days this year (Robert Half)

  • Around 25% of workers said they receive 20-30 days of sick time or paid vacation a year, with the second most common choice being between 15-20 days (Comparably)

  • 19% of workers reported receiving unlimited time off, and nearly a third of workers said their boss pesters them with work while they are on vacation (Comparably)

  • Around 40% of those in business development, legal and the executive suite admitted that their work is never done, even during a vacation (Comparably)

  • 58% of workers save vacation time for the summer months of June, July and August (Robert Half)

  • Cities with the most workers saving time for vacation are Los Angeles (74%), New York and Detroit (71%), and Miami (69%) (Robert Half)

  • About 73% of workers said they have access to a bank of paid time off, but those with this benefit weren’t really interested in it – they’d rather have an unlimited plan instead (Zoro)

  • 52.4% of employees wished they had unlimited paid time off (Zoro)

  • 30% of women and 28% of men planned to take 6-10 vacation days (Robert Half)

  • 3% of employers have extended unlimited paid time off to all employees, 4% are considering it and 9% are considering offering unlimited PTO to only executives or exempt employees (Mercer)

  • Unlimited paid time off has been extended to all employees by 3% of employers (Mercer)

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  • 4% of employers are considering unlimited paid time off for employees, and 9% said they are considering offering unlimited PTO to only executives or exempt employees (Mercer)

  • 81% of workers said that stress negatively affects their work, with symptoms ranging from fatigue and anxiety to physical ailments, causing them to miss work (Ginger)

  • Gen Z and Millennials are more likely to call in sick multiple times a year (Ginger)

  • 40% of employers that made the switch from vacation and sick time to PTO reported that employees were more present (WorldatWork)

  • 43% of companies offered PTO in 2016, up from 28% in 2002 (WorldatWork)

  • 32% of workers say they feel pressured not to take time off (TSheets)

  • 84% of the workforce currently has access to paid time off and 65% did not use all of their PTO allocation last year, with 18% blaming their workload (TSheets)

  • U.S. workers get an average of 11 days paid time off per year and typically don’t use five of these days per year (TSheets)

  • 60% of employees who did take time off last year worked while they were on vacation (TSheets)

  • 48% of employees said they do not get enough time off (TSheets)

  • 74% of employees chose a raise when asked to choose between more PTO and a raise (TSheets)

  • Employees preferred 52 days of paid time off a year, a 38 hour work week and working remotely 11 days a month (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • 39% of workers said they would accept a job without PTO (TSheets)

  • Half of workers reported missing a minimum of one workday out of a 12 month period because of stress (Ginger)

  • 43% of workers report they are often or always stressed, and one-third of these employees said the stress they experience at work is detrimental to their health (TSheets)

  • 41% of employees have seen to their own wellness by taking mental health days (Staples)

  • Among employees that told their supervisors they were taking time off for mental health, 92% said the boss was supportive about it (Staples)

  • Stress levels were found to be higher among employees who do not get PTO and 51% of them say they are often or always stressed, with 58% describing it as unhealthy (TSheets)

  • 51% of employees admitted they had previously misled a manager about why they need to take time off (TSheets)

  • More than one-third of workers have taken days off for mental health in the past 12 months, while 61% have taken days off for physical issues (University of Phoenix)

  • Parents with children under 18 were almost twice as likely as non-parents to take at least one mental health day per year (University of Phoenix)

  • Almost half of adult workers don’t think employers see mental health as an acceptable reason for an absence (University of Phoenix)

  • Top 3 reasons for misleading managers about taking time off are: insomnia (15%), mental health reasons (13%) and physical health reasons (12%) (TSheets)

  • One-third of employees admitted calling in sick when they weren’t ill to get out of work (O.C. Tanner)

  • 68% of employees call in sick less than once a year and 12% call in once a year (O.C. Tanner)

  • More than one-third of employees who have called in sick agreed that their work situation keeps them from being happy in other areas of their lives, and 40% of those who called in sick said they don’t trust their senior leaders (O.C. Tanner)

  • 89% of employees come to work sick with 19% admitting to doing this more than once a month (TSheets)

  • 11% of employees said they never come to work sick (TSheets)

  • 12% of employees believe employers should not provide sick leave (TSheets)

  • The most desirable PTO benefits are: paid holidays (91%), sick leave (88%), and paid vacation days (87%) (TSheets)

  • 22% of employees said employers should not provide maternity leave while 28% said employers should not provide paid paternity leave (TSheets)

  • 46% of employees said they would take a lower paying job with more flexible working arrangements (TSheets)

  • The older generations were slightly more likely than millennials to want time-off benefits (Zoro)

  • 57% of employees ages 55+ said they get more than 11 days of PTO per year while 52% of 18-22 year old employees said they get five days or less (TSheets)

  • 11% of ages 55+ get no PTO compared to 25% of 18-24 year olds (TSheets)

  • 73% of older employees said they did not use all of their PTO last year and 77% admitting to working while they were on PTO (TSheets)

  • Canada employers typically offer 10 days of PTO a year , Australian employers offer between 16-20 PTO days annually, and the U.S. usually offers 11 days per year (TSheets)

  • 16% of American workers say they get no PTO at all compared to 14% of Australian workers and just 8% of Canadian workers (TSheets)

  • 74% of U.S. workers would take a raise over more time off, in Australia this drops to 69% and in Canada to 65% saying they would take more money over more time off (TSheets)

  • 8% of employers say they plan on providing employees with more paid time off in 2018 (LaSalle Network)

  • 44% of small business employees believe PTO is important; 21% said they believe it drives their team’s performance (JustWorks)
  • 63% of employees would turn down a job offer that didn't include PTO (TSheets)
  • 88% of employees say employers should offer PTO (TSheets)
  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 70% say they’re driven to contribute to their organization’s success, as opposed to the 55% who don’t regularly take a week of vacation (O.C. Tanner)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 65% say they feel strongly about working for their organization a year from now, compared to 51% who don’t take a week off in the summer (O.C. Tanner)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 63% say they have a sense of belonging at their company, compared to 43% who skip at least a week of vacation time (O.C. Tanner)

  • 90% of employees who plan vacations ahead of time are happy with their professional success; 87% are happy with their workplace (Project: Time Off)
  • 45% of employees say the ideal number of PTO days would be 20 or more; employees aged 18 to 29 say 16 to 20 days (Fierce)
  • 84% of employees report their employers offered paid vacation time in 2017 (EBRI)

  • Paid vacation time (65%) and health insurance (62%) are the most commonly offered benefits (Clutch)

  • 23% of millennials say that paid vacation time is their top priority, while 14% of Generation X and 12% of Baby Boomers say the same (Clutch)

  • 26% of workers say vacation time and paid time off are the most important non-salary factors when considering a job offer (Accountemps)

  • 15% of employees would like to take unlimited vacation days each year, up 5% since 2012 (Fierce)
  • Among companies that offer unlimited vacation days, employees only take about 13 days off (Namely)
  • 14% of the US workforce has access to employer-sponsored paid family leave (Boston Consulting Group)
  • 55% of people think others probably take paid leave on false premises (Pew)
  • 85% of Americans say sick workers should receive paid leave (Pew)
  • 82% of Americans say women should receive paid leave after giving birth or adopting (Pew)
  • 7% of men are likely to use paid leave vs. 1% of women (Businessolver)

  • 9% of men are likely to use unpaid leave vs. 3% of women (Businessolver)

  • Those who took leave after working with an HR manager had a lower leave duration (59 days) than those who worked with their direct supervisor (77 days) (The Standard)

  • 26% of employees report their employers offered paid paternity leave in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 69% of Americans say men should receive paid paternity leave (Pew)
  • 51% of Americans say the federal government should mandate that employers cover paid family and medical leave, 48% say employers should be able to decide whether to offer that leave (Pew)
  • 5% of employers offer paid sabbaticals (SHRM)

  • 58% of all workers and 64% of millennials want paid family leave from their employers, ranking at the top of in demand perks like flexible and remote work options (55%), sabbaticals (38%), student loan repayment assistance (35%), pet-friendly workplaces (15%) and pet insurance (15%) (Unum)

  • 48% of small business owners say they would, on some level, support legislation requiring paid family leave (Paychex)

  • 35% of American small business owners lack strong feelings either way on the topic of mandatory paid family leave, while 18% oppose the idea (Paychex)

  • 114 million people in the U.S. still don’t have a single day of paid family leave (PL+US)
  • 32% of employers offer paid family leave programs (DMEC)
  • Among companies that don't offer paid family leave, 18% said they plan to include it in their benefits offerings in 2017, 33% hope to make it available in 2018 and 41% said that adding the benefits could take from 3-5 years (DMEC)
  • 35% of employees indicated maternity leave was offered at their organization, followed by paternity leave (29%), adoption leave (28%), parental leave (27%), foster child leave (21%) and surrogacy leave (12%) (SHRM)

  • The percentage of employers offering paid maternity leave increased from 26% in 2016 to 35% in 2018 (SHRM)

  • 45% of employees report their employers offered paid maternity leave in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 30% of organizations are now providing more paid maternity leave than legally required, up from 26% in 2016 (SHRM)
  • 58% of private employers offer paid sick leave, up from 53% in 2016 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • Women who take paid leave are 93% more likely to be with the same company 9 to 12 months after a child's birth than women who take no leave (Boston Consulting Group)
  • 58% of organizations offer at least some replacement pay for women on maternity leave; up from 46% 11 years ago (SHRM)
  • 87% of men vs 75% of women said their employer’s maternity benefits are sufficient (Businessolver)

  • 81% of employers allow employees to return to work gradually after the birth of a child or adoption, up from 73% in 2012 (SHRM)
  • Among employers offering any replacement pay, the percentage offering full pay has declined from 17% in 2005 to 10% in 2016 (SHRM)
  • Almost 60% of stay-at-home parents revealed they ultimately took more time off work than anticipated before exiting the workforce (Flexjobs)

  • 6% of parents took less time away from the workforce than they anticipated they would (Flexjobs)

  • Less than one-third of employers offering paid parental leave received an ROE boost of 2.2%, while 23% of companies offering day care services reported a 2.5% ROE advantage (JUST Capital)

  • About 40% of employers offer paid parental leave for both birth and non-birth parents, up from 25% in 2015 (Mercer)

  • More than 40% of employers said they offer workers paid parental leave, a 16% increase from 2015 (Mercer)

  • 40% of millennials see parental leave as an important benefit (LIMRA)

  • 38% of US employers offer paid parental leave (WorldAtWork)
  • 21% of full-time workers receive paid parental leave (Clutch)

  • 78% of the employers offering paid parental leave make it available to all workers (WorldAtWork)
  • 53% of employers mandate that workers take paid parental leave in the first year of parenthood (WorldAtWork)
  • Just over half of employers offer paid leave to both mothers and fathers, but by 2019, those numbers could rise to as much as 75% for fathers and 80% for mothers (WTW)

  • Employers are starting to support part-time workers with maternity and child care benefits, including unpaid leave (52%), adoption or surrogacy stipends (34%) and childcare support (23%) (WTW)

  • Employers try to support parents via flexible work locations or schedules (61%), additional unpaid leave (34%), parent support groups (15%), coaching and returning to work after parental leave (13%), overnight breast milk delivery for mothers who travel for work (9%) and concierge services for new parents (7%)  (WTW)

  • 49% of households set aside time to plan vacations; these are 51% of them use all their vacation time (Project: Time Off
  • Distressed workers spend one-third of their time being unproductive and are out sick an average of one full day a month (EAPA)

  • Employees without paid sick leave were 1.6 times more likely to say they were very worried about short-term expenses compared to those with paid sick leave (Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University)

  • When compared to employees with paid sick leave, workers without the benefit reported having significantly higher levels of psychological distress and were 1.5 times more likely to say their distress symptoms interfered a lot with their day-to-day lives and activities (Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University)

  • Workers without paid sick leave were three times more likely to have earnings below the poverty line and were more apt to face food insecurity and need welfare services (Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University)

  • 68% of Americans and 31% of part-time workers can access paid sick days, with Hispanic workers having the lowest rates of access at just 45% (Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University)

  • 72% of HR managers say the day after the Super Bowl should be a paid national holiday for employees (OfficeTeam)

  • 71% of employees report their employers offered paid sick leave in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 85% of all employees say sick leave is still important (TSheets)
  • 21% of employees receive dedicated mental health support from their employer, and an average of 8.4 sick days are taken each year due to a mental health problem (BHSF)

  • 24% of employees worry that if they did need to take a sick day due to a mental health issue, they wouldn’t be taken seriously (BHSF)

  • 23% of employees said they would feel more supported if dedicated days off were allocated for mental wellbeing, and a further 22% would benefit from dedicated mental health support staff (BHSF)

  • 61% of employees acknowledge they would rather work when they feel sick than use their paid time off or sick time (Glassdoor)

  • 35% of workers call in “sick” just to take a mental health day (American Express)
  • 44% of employees say they have taken a mental health day (Staples)

  • 40% of workers have called in sick in the last 12 months when they weren’t vs. 35% in 2016 (CareerBuilder)

  • 30% of workers who have called in sick cite having a doctor’s appointment as the top reason to take a sick day (CareerBuilder)

  • 26% of employers have fired an employee for using a fake excuse to get out of work (CareerBuilder)

  • 28% of workers who have a paid time off program still feel the need to make up an excuse for taking a day off (CareerBuilder)

  • 50% of employees plan to take vacation time around July 4 (Office Pulse)

  • 20% of managers feel overwhelmed by the high volume of vacation requests (Office Pulse)

  • 14% of professionals said they resent their employer for their treatment of vacation time (Office Pulse)

  • 43% of U.S. workers say they plan to take a vacation during the holidays, and of this group, 21% will completely disconnect from work (Gallup)

  • 22% of workers will be taking a vacation but checking in with work via email or other means (Gallup)

  • 57% of employees are not taking vacation time around the holidays (Gallup)

  • Employees with meaningful work stay on the job 7.4 months longer than other employees, put in an extra hour a week and take two fewer paid leave days a year (Betterup)

  • 700 million vacation days went unused in 2016 (Namely)
  • 70% of employees did not use all their PTO last year, and 26% of them had 10 or more unused PTO days (TSheets)
  • 70% of employees say they didn’t use all their PTO last year (Namely)
  • Low performers in the office take 14 days of vacation, compared with 19 days on average for high performers (Namely)
  • Employees at companies with unlimited PTO policies take just 13 days a year, compared with 15 days for those with traditional paid time off plans (Namely)
  • 62% of employees are either more stressed or have the same level of stress upon returning from vacation (Fierce)
  • 38% of employees unsatisfied with work feel more stressed returning from vacation; just 14% of those very satisfied feel the same (Fierce)
  • 27% of employees who are able to access work remotely actually unplug during time off (Project: Time Off)

  • 46% of employees are checking in occasionally and 27% frequently during time off (Project: Time Off)

  • 78% of employees want the ability to access work if they choose to during time off (Project: Time Off)

  • Gen X is actually the least likely to unplug on vacation (23% vs. 28% of Millennials) and feel more comfortable taking time off knowing they can connect to work (82% vs. 77% of Millennials) (Project: Time Off)

  • 79% of employees who are leaving their current job due to poor company culture say that paid time off is extremely or very important in their next job (Project: Time Off)

  • Cultures that support unplugging have employees that are more engaged and more likely to report feeling that their employer cares about them as a person (64% to 43%) and that their job is important (73% to 57%) (Project: Time Off)

  • 40% of employees in cultures that do not support unplugging are looking or planning to look for a new job in the next year and just 21% of employees in supportive cultures say the same (Project: Time Off)

  • 40% of both full- and part-time workers plan to work during their vacation or at least check in with the office (University of Chicago)
  • 51% of employees were uneasy about asking managers for time off during the holiday season (West Monroe Partner)

  • Over 50% of employees believe their managers support and encourage them to take time off; 40% of employees believe the same of their coworkers (Fierce)
  • 80% of employees feel more comfortable taking time off if a manager encouraged them (Namely)
  • 9% of men are likely to use personal time off vs. 4% of women (Businessolver)

  • 57% of dissatisfied employees say no one encourages them or supports them taking PTO; just 18% of those very satisfied feel the same (Fierce)
  • 45% of individuals in households making $50,000 or less a year say no one encourages them to take vacation, while less than 30% of those making $100,000 or more say the same (Fierce)
  • 44% of small business employees said they believe PTO is important; 21% said they believe it drives their team’s performance (JustWorks)
  • 31.6% of employees would give up a portion of their salary for more PTO days (LendingTree)
  • 1 in 3 workers would like more PTO (TSheets)
  • 35.7% of Millennial employees would give up over $1000 for five extra PTO days (LendingTree)
  • 50% of small business employees would accept a lower-paying job for more PTO (JustWorks)
  • 62% of employees would forego a raise for more flexibility in their work schedules and approximately 20% preferred PTO to a raise (TSheets)
  • 22% of workers underreport their work hours (Kimble Applications)
  • 36% of employees admit they’ve responded to work emails after 10pm, 36% while on vacation, 15% while on dates, and 19% after 3am (American Express)
  • 50% of employees check in with the office while on vacation, with 13% checking in daily (Fierce)
  • Of the 67% of workers who will take at least part of Christmas week off, 64% will check in with the office while they’re out (Robert Half)

  • 15% of employees say they have specifically taken a holiday in a place where their phone or computer wouldn’t work (Staples)

  • Women prioritized vacation time in considering offers, while men favored corporate culture (Accountemps)

  • 76% of millennials are significantly more inclined to take a business trip if an added vacation is an option (National Car Rental)

  • 78% of bleisure-takers (adding leisure activities to business trips) say their bosses take leisure time during trips, and 76% of leisure-taking supervisors say they encourage relaxation during a business trip (National Car Rental)

  • Nearly half of bleisure-takers (adding leisure activities to business trips) feel reticent about talking to their bosses about the time off they plan to take (National Car Rental)

  • 38% of employees say their company allows them time off to follow their passions (ReportLinker)
  • 28% of employers allow employees to receive special consideration after a career break for personal/family responsibilities (up from from 21% in 2012) (SHRM)
  • 81% of employers allow employees to take time off during the workday to attend to important family or personal needs without loss of pay, down from 87% in 2012) (SHRM)
  • 20% of LGBTQ employees are afraid to request time off to care for a loved one because it might disclose their LGBTQ identity (Human Rights Campaign)

  • 40% of employers will offer "Summer Fridays" in 2017 (Gartner)
  • Properly administering and managing lost time is a top pursuit for 62% of employers (AJG)
  • Unplanned employee absences waste one hour for every 10 hours of budgeted in-store labor (Kronos)

  • 52% of retailers cited unplanned absences as one of their more time-consuming problems (Kronos)

  • Retailers are understaffed 25% of the time due to last-minute absences; 49% of U.S. retailers said that most of the time, they are given one to three hours notice when an employee is not going to show up for work (Kronos)

  • 55% of retailers have technology to manage unplanned absences, and 59% said that scheduling technology can positively impact their teams’ productivity (Kronos)

  • Retailers believe that new absence and shift-swapping solutions can reduce absenteeism by as much as 18% (Kronos)

Flexible Working Stats

  • Flexible schedules and work-at-home options ranked the highest as most preferred benefits across all age groups; paid family leave rank the lowest (Monster)

  • 55% of employees want flexible/remote work options (Unum)

  • Full-time workers reported being happy in their jobs 22% more than workers who are never remote (Owl Labs)

  • Remote workers reported working over 40 hours per week, 43% more than non-remote workers (Owl Labs)

  • 62% of employees work remotely at least part of the time (Owl Labs)

  • Reasons employees said they decided to work remotely include work-life balance (91%), increased productivity/better focus (79%), less stress (78%), and to avoid a commute (78%) (Owl Labs)

  • Remote workers said they’re likely to stay in their current job for the next five years, 13% more than on-site workers did (Owl Labs)

  • 30% of employees said they’ve left a job for not offering work flexibility (Flexjobs)

  • Top reasons employees wanted flexible work schedules include work-life balance (75%), family (45%), time savings (42%), and commute stress (41%) (Flexjobs)

  • 16% of employees are looking for a new job because they want flexibility (Flexjobs)

  • 80% of employees said they would be more loyal to their employer if it offered job flexibility, and more than half said they have tried to negotiate flexible work with their employer (Flexjobs)

  • 52% of employees say they have some choice over when they work (O.C. Tanner)

  • 74% of employees have the ability to move to different areas to do their work (O.C. Tanner)

  • 43% of employees work away from their team at least some of the time (O.C. Tanner)

  • The type of flexible work employees wanted most was 100% remote work (Flexjobs)

  • More than half of employees said job flexibility would have a positive impact on the quality of their life, and 78% said it would allow them to be healthier (Flexjobs)

  • 67% of employees said flexible work schedules would help them feel satisfied at work, followed by access to natural light (53%), and quiet spaces (42%) (Capital One)

  • 45% of companies that disclosed flexible working hour policies saw a 2% ROE advantage (JUST Capital)

  • 74% of employees believe flexible working is now the norm (IWG)

  • 80% of workers say they would choose to work a job with a flexible work option over one without (IWG)

  • 83% of employers have adopted a flexible workspace policy in the past decade (IWG)

  • 81% of employers say expanding the talent pool is the key motivator for adopting flexible work policies (IWG)

  • More than one-third of employees say flexibility is more important than an esteemed title (IWG)

  • 52% of employees said they work offsite for at least half a workweek, and 71% said that having a choice of where they want to work is a key factor in considering career opportunities (IWG)

  • 45% of employees think commuting is the worse part of their day, with more than half believing that commuting will be obsolete by 2030 (IWG)

  • 75% of those who work from home expressed a desire to continue doing so until retirement (Amerisleep)

  • 86% of IT developers work remotely, with almost one-third working from home full time (DigitalOcean)

  • 43% of IT developers said the ability to work remotely is a must have when considering a job offer (DigitalOcean)

  • 71% of IT developers who work remotely said they feel connected to their organization’s community (DigitalOcean)

  • 29% of remote IT developers feel isolated and said they’re disengaged from their company’s culture and excluded from offline conversations with team members when working offsite (DigitalOcean)

  • 76% of IT developers expected remote work to offer more work-life balance, but many reported working longer hours and that their work-life balance was only slightly better than their onsite colleagues (DigitalOcean)

  • 57% of remote workers were more likely than the average American to be satisfied with their job (Amerisleep)

  • 43% of U.S. employers currently offer remote work arrangements, and 49% now allow workers to set their own hours (Condeco)

  • 41% of leaders said their company already offers some form of remote working, and 60% permit employees to set their workday’s start and end times (Condeco)

  • American businesses were least likely to offer flextime (49%)(Condeco)

  • 43% of U.S. businesses plan to offer more remote work options in the upcoming year vs 9% that plan to reduce their remote work arrangements (Condeco)

  • Over 80% of remote workers reported high job satisfaction (Amerisleep)

  • 40% of remote employees described their day as not stressful (Amerisleep)

  • On average, people worked from home 47 hours a week but felt unproductive roughly a quarter of the time (Amerisleep)

  • About 80% of people who worked from home said they felt isolated from others at least a little of the time (Amerisleep)

  • Roughly 76% of people who worked from home reported feeling left out at least a little of the time (Amerisleep)

  • 69% of Gen Z said flexible hours (69%) are a valued employee benefit, along with free health care (23%) and the option to work remotely (18%) (Sharefile)

  • More than half of workplaces worldwide now offer a remote work option or some hybrid form of it (Owl Labs)

  • 44% of employers now offer remote work options (up from 39% last year) (PayScale)

  • 37% of employers now offer flex time (PayScale)

  • 81% of employees thought a flexible job would help them be a better spouse, partner or significant other, 87% said it would give them more time to spend with family or friends and 61% of those with children or that plan to have children thought a job with work flexibility would make them a better parent (FlexJobs)

  • 89% of workers believe a flexible job would help them take better care of themselves (Flexjobs)

  • 65% of workers think they’d be more productive working at home than in the office (FlexJobs)

  • 75% of workers say it should take less than seven hours each day to do their job (The Workforce Institute & Kronos)

  • 62% of workers agree their job offers enough flexibility to have a healthy work-life balance, while 14% disagree (The Workforce Institute & Kronos)

  • 75% of workers said they experience greater productivity at home because they encounter fewer distractions, fewer interruptions from colleagues (74%), less stress from commuting (71%) and less office politics (65%) (FlexJobs)

  • 61% of workers left or considered quitting a job because it lacked work flexibility options (FlexJobs)

  • 90% of employees say more flexible work arrangements and schedules will increase morale (Staples)

  • 34% of employers have a formal or informal policy in place on remote work while 64% of workers say they work remotely at least part of the time (Staples)

  • 80% of workers said telecommuting all the time is the most in-demand type of flexible work arrangement, followed by flexible schedules (71%) (FlexJobs)

  • Over 50% of employees said their companies offered remote work options, and of those whose companies do, 91% said they’re as productive working remotely as they are in the workplace (West Monroe Partner)

  • 43% of U.S. employees now say they work remotely in some capacity (Gallup)
  • 63% of employees said flexible work hours were nice to have (Hays)

  • 4% of employees said flexible work was not important to them (Hays)

  • Nearly two-thirds of companies have employees who work remotely (Upwork)

  • Since 2005, the U.S. has seen a 115% increase in the number of employees who work from home at least half the time (Upwork)

  • 57% of companies lack a remote work policy (Upwork)

  • 77% of employees reported they are more productive when working away from the office (Upwork)

  • The number of younger people able to work from locations other than their employer’s primary site increased more than 20% compared to 2016 (Deloitte)

  • 53% of small businesses are utilizing flexible talent, up 16 points from 2017 and anticipated to grow by 20% in the next 10 years (Upwork)

  • 60% of small businesses agree that remote work has become more commonplace compared to three years ago (Upwork)

  • 67% of small businesses have someone on their team who works a significant portion of their time remotely, up 13 points from last year (Upwork)

  • In the next 10 years, small businesses predict that 35% of their employees will work predominantly from remote locations (Upwork)

  • 86% of small businesses have made progress in developing a more agile, flexible talent strategy (Upwork)

  • 63% of small businesses agree dynamic team structures will become the norm (Upwork)

  • 84% of employees claimed to work in a job offering some degree of flexibility (Deloitte)

  • 85% of office workers want the tools that make it possible to work in the office, from home, in coffee shops and other remote locations (Softchoice)

  • 82% of U.S. workers say the ability to work from anywhere at any time allows them to maintain a healthy work/life balance, 62% still prefer to work in the office (Randstad)

  • 81% of parents who said they worked flexibly said they still had to bring work home at evenings or weekends (Working Families)

  • 66% of workers say they like the option of occasionally working from home or another location, but aren’t able to do so (Randstad)

  • 36% of workers report their workplaces support working from home anytime and anywhere they want (Randstad)

  • 35% of employees disagree that their employers provide the necessary technical equipment to enable them to work from home (Randstad)

  • 30% of workers say they regularly have online or virtual team meetings via video conferencing (Randstad)

  • 41% of employees said they would only work for an employer offering agile work options (Spherion)

  • 80% of workers say they like agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) because it increases their productivity, creativity and job satisfaction (Randstad)

  • 61% of workers don’t believe agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) interferes with their personal lives, or their ability to disconnect from work (Randstad)

  • 66% of Americans report they complete more work outside normal working hours because of mobile technology advances over the last decade (Gallup)

  • Remote jobs listings in math and economics, insurance, non-profit and philanthropy and seven other areas grew by more than 50% in just 12 months in 2018 (Flexjobs)

  • 43% of U.S. employees work remotely in some capacity (Gallup)

  • 74% of workers said they would quit their current jobs to work for an organization offering remote-work options (Softchoice)

  • When employers were asked which benefits they think appeal most to employees or potential employees, they said flexible hours (33%), working remotely (19%), paid long-term maternity/paternity leave (12%), and unlimited vacation time and tuition reimbursement (tied at 11%) (Modis)
  • 52% of employees work remotely at least once per week (Owl Labs)

  • Less than 10% of older and younger workers would say they produce their best work in the office; more than 60% said they’d be more productive if they telecommuted and 41% said they don’t think they should have to exchange salary or vacation time for telecommuting options (Flexjobs)

  • Almost 30% of workers would take a wage cut in order to telecommute (FlexJobs)

  • 77% of workers said they’d be more likely to accept a job offer if they knew they could telecommute at least some of the time (Robert Half)

  • 86% of employees between the ages 18-34 said they’d sooner sign a contract with remote work options (Robert Half)

  • 65% of employees older than 55 said they’d sooner sign a contract with remote work options (Robert Half)

  • 57% of employers lack an outline of short and long-term goals as well as equipping with secure technology for remote workers even though they have remote workers (Robert Half)

  • 43% of employees expect the flexibility of remote working from their employer (Staples)

  • 75% of U.S. millennial workers said the work environment should be flexible and fluid (American Express)

  • Among Millennial and Gen Z employees who said they intend to stay with their current employers for at least 5 years, 55% note greater flexibility in where and when they work now compared to 3 years ago (Deloitte)

  • 38% of employers actually offer flexible or remote working (Staples)

  • 36% of parents revealed they wanted to continue working but said their jobs were too inflexible to accommodate their needs as a working parent (Flexjobs)

  • The ideal return to work situation for 90% of parents was the ability to work remotely from home (Flexjobs)

  • 44% of workers feel that flexible working is a genuine work-life balance option for parents in their workplace; however, 34% of workers have faked being ill in order to meet family obligations (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 31% of workers are effectively prevented from working flexibly, and 35% who do work flexibly state that their work-life balance is not ideal for them or their family (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 57% of employees able to work remotely say having this option available enables them to get away from distractions and makes them more productive (Staples)

  • 40% of employees said that flexible/remote work options can lower workplace distractions, and 52% say they’re more productive when working remotely (Udemy)

  • Sales/Business development hires remote employees 66% more often than average (Owl Labs)

  • Small companies are 2X more likely to hire full-time remote employees (Owl Labs)

  • Full-time remote workers are 2X more likely to be individual contributors than management (Owl Labs)

  • 38% of individual contributors work from home more often than management (Owl Labs)

  • Companies that support remote work have 25% lower employee turnover than companies that don’t (Owl Labs)

  • Working remotely doesn’t negatively impact employees’ investment in their work (Owl Labs)

  • 51% of remote employees work remotely to improve work/life balance (Owl Labs)

  • Employees miss conversations and celebrations most when working remotely (Owl Labs)

  • 35% of remote workers said their colleagues team up against them (VitalSmarts)

  • 52% of remote workers found their colleagues treat them unfairly (VitalSmarts)

  • 67% of remote workers claim their colleagues don’t support their priorities (VitalSmarts)

  • Remote workers say their biggest challenge is staying in the loop (Owl Labs)

  • 57% of onsite employees choose not to work remotely because the nature of their job doesn’t allow it (Owl Labs)

  • Remote workers with managers who work on site have 25% fewer career growth conversations than average (Owl Labs)

  • Job performance is most important to managers when considering an employee’s request to work remotely (Owl Labs)

  • Managers see equal performance between their onsite and remote employees (Owl Labs)

  • Companies with no corporate headquarters (fully-distributed companies) hire 33% faster than other companies (Owl Labs)

  • 65% of employees who don’t work remotely state they would like to work outside of the office at least once a month (Owl Labs)

  • Telecommuting has increased 159% since 2000 (Quartz)
  • 32% of employees have flexible hours, and 41% of those with perks say that flexible hours are the most important perk they receive (Clutch)

  • 47% of employees say their employer offers flexible hours (ReportLinker)
  • 15% of men are likely to want flexible scheduling vs. 9% of women (Businessolver)

  • 70% of organizations offer some form of telecommuting option to employees, up from 62% in 2017 and 59% in 2014 (SHRM)

  • 11% of employees say their workplace offers telecommuting; 70% of those say they can telecommute as often as they like  (ReportLinker)
  • 15% or women and 11% of men say that working from home is their top employee perk (Clutch)

  • 40% of employers allow employees to work some of their paid hours at home on a regular basis, up from 33% in 2012 (SHRM)
  • The percentage of at-home workers grew from 19% to 22% between 2003 and 2016 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 7% of U.S. employers allow employees to telecommute (FlexJobs)
  • 40% of employers offer “softer” benefits like flexible schedules (Adecco)
  • 71% of senior staff agrees that telecommuting allows them to get more work done, compared to 51% of middle or staff level employees (CompTIA)
  • 3.9 million employees were telecommuting by 2015, up from 1.8 million in 2005 (FlexJobs)
  • Telecommuting has grown 159% since 2000 (FlexJobs)
  • 11% of employers offer telecommute benefits (ReportLinker)
  • 43% of employees worked remotely at least some of the time in 2016 (Gallup)
  • 31% of employees spend 80% or more of their time working remotely (Gallup)
  • 79% of employees with flexibility indicated that they were more happy at work (IBM)
  • Benefits that employees surveyed say demonstrate empathy from the company include: Flexible work hours (96%), Paid maternity leave (96%), Medical/health insurance (95%) (Businessolver)
  • 30% of employees who work from home are engaged (Gallup)
  • 76% of advertising and marketing executives say their company offers some form of alternative work arrangement (The Creative Group)
  • 61% of employees say their direct manager is supportive of flexible work arrangements (Mercer)
  • 61% of employees think the traditional 9-to-5 work schedule is outdated (CareerBuilder)
  • 41.5% of employees would like to see flexible hours introduced to their work benefits (LendingTree)
  • Perks Millennials prefer from employers: flexible schedules (70%), good benefits (60%) (NSHSS)
  • 50% of employees believe working remotely or part-time can adversely impact promotional opportunities (Mercer)
  • Fully remote workers are 29% less likely to strongly agree that they have reviewed their greatest successes with their manager in the past six months (Gallup)
  • Fully remote workers are 30% less likely to strongly agree that they have talked with their manager about steps to reach their goals in the past six months (Gallup)
  • 42% of small business employees would take a lower-paying job if it offered a greater degree of workplace flexibility (JustWorks)
  • 70% of small-business employees say flexible work schedules are very important (JustWorks)
  • 84% of Millennials report at least some degree of flexible working, with 39% saying they were a part of highly flexible environments (Deloitte)
  • 68% of small business employees said flexible hours positively affected their teams (JustWorks)
  • 75% of Millennials would prefer to work from home or other locations where they feel they could be most productive. However, only 43% currently are allowed to do this (Deloitte
  • 45% of telecommuters say they love their jobs, compared to 38% of mobile workers and 24% of employees who worked every day in their offices (Leadership IQ)
  • Top five reasons employees say they like working for small businesses: flexible scheduling (27%), seeing the fruits of their labor (23%), feeling their input matters (17%), being rewarded for hard work (14%) and getting noticed by people who matter (9%) (Aflac)
  • 10% of employees want a situation where they do not come into the office at all, and 35% do not want any telecommuting days at all (CompTIA
  • 63% of Millennials say they're more likely to join a company that offers the option to telecommute (along with 57% of GenX, 41% of Boomers) (CompTIA
  • 44% of employees view companies that don't offer a telecommuting option as old-fashioned (CompTIA

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  • 90% of HR leaders said they embrace digital practices like flexible scheduling and remote work, but just 15% of them have fully adopted digital practices (Allegis Group)

  • 17% of companies investing in data-based HR technology are looking to reduce turnover (OutMatch)

  • 60% of companies investing in data-based HR technology said they had average turnover rates of up to 20%, and 25% of the organizations had turnover rates of up to 50% (OutMatch)

  • 31% of retail workers prefer to choose their own shifts vs 18% of employees across other industries (ManpowerGroup)

  • The most common adaptions to accommodate millennials in the U.S. are making work hours more flexible (21%), allowing work from home (17%), increasing training (16%), implementing new mentoring programs (13%), and altering corporate culture (10%) (Duke/CFO
  • 73.5% of associations offer employees flexible work schedules (ASAE)
  • 48% of HR professionals reported millennials as their largest non-desk work group, but 32% said they are the hardest generation among Gen Z, Gen X and Baby Boomers to engage (Speakap)

  • 40% of job candidates cite schedule flexibility as one of three top career considerations (Manpower Group)
  • 45% of U.S. job candidates want work flexibility (Manpower Group)
  • 43% of millennials would switch jobs for greater flexibility (Unify)
  • 35% of workers want to be able to work off-site full time and 37% part time (Gallup)

  • 51% of employees saying they are interested in contract or freelance work for more flexible hours (MetLife)
  • 53% of employees say greater work-life balance and personal well-being are very important to them when considering whether to take a job with a different organization (Gallup)

  • 23% of people cited better work-life balance as a reason they would leave a traditional job to do freelance work (ReportLinker)

  • 17% of people cited flexible hours, 10% a need for freedom and 8% higher compensation as reasons they would leave a traditional job to do freelance work (ReportLinker)

  • 94% of workers are open to non-traditional forms of work (ManpowerGroup)

  • For 81% of workers, non-traditional work arrangements are a choice, rather than a necessity (ManpowerGroup)

  • 80% of boomers (ages 50-65) would consider working as independent contractors and freelancers (ManpowerGroup)

  • Job searches for flexible work are up 32% (Hiring Lab)
  • 38% of workers said their employers ensured that they had a suitable workspace at home (Bupa UK)
  • 51% of people who work from home said they suffer from work-related injuries (Bupa UK)
  • Traditional workers reported much less flexibility (27%) than the other two groups, who came in at 38% for contingent (temporary or on-call) and 58% for independent workers (contractors or online platform workers) (Gallup)

  • If not managed well, the element of isolation for remote workers can result in a 21% drop in performance (O.C. Tanner)

  • 92% of IT professionals recognized the benefits of remote work, but about the same amount said the perk comes with security risks, and more than half said the risks are greater than those for onsite workers (OpenVPN)

  • 73% of VP and C-suite IT leaders think remote workers present a greater risk than onsite employees, while only about half of IT managers and IT directors thought so (OpenVPN)

  • On a scale of 1-5, a flexible work schedule is very important to many IT developers (44%) (DigitalOcean)

  • Employees’ most desired summer perks are flexible schedules (52%) and early departures on Fridays (27%) (Accountemps)

  • About half of senior managers said they offer flexible schedules, more relaxed dress code and company picnics or potlucks as summer perks (Accountemps)

  • About one-third of senior managers said workers are allowed to leave early on Fridays during the summer (Accountemps)

  • 70% of organizations now offer some type of telecommuting, either on a full-time, part-time or ad-hoc basis, up from 62% last year and 59% in 2014 (SHRM)

Benefits Management Stats

  • 52% of employers said they believe virtual care will play a significant role in the future of healthcare delivery (NBGH)

  • Employers believe the most challenging issues in the year ahead are:

    • Attracting strong, competent management and dedicated, capable staff (33%);
    • Offering competitive compensation and benefits (31%)
    • High employee turnover (26%)
    • Developing employees and future leaders for succession (23%)
    • Building a positive brand and culture (20%)
    • Maintaining ongoing regulatory compliance (19%)
    • Measuring and managing employee performance (18%)
    • Managing the hiring process and tracking applicants (16%)
    • Creating operational efficiencies with overall HR administration (16%) (Oasis)
  • 51% of employers said implementing more virtual solutions was their top healthcare initiative in 2019, and 95% have already implemented telehealth services for minor, non-urgent services (NBGH)

  • 49% of employers are taking a more active role in changing healthcare delivery through a range of actions, including experimenting with new payment and delivery models like accountable care organizations, centers of excellence and performance networks (NBGH)

  • 35% of employers indicated they would “actively pursue” an ACO or high-performance network strategy in 2019, either by direct contracting or by promoting ACOs and HPNs offered by their health plans (NBGH)

  • 47% of employers noted that controlling employee benefit costs was a top human resource priority (Gallagher)

  • 60% of employers aren’t proactively trying to manage the waste in healthcare (Benfield Gallagher)

  • 57% of employers think that up to 25% of treatments for employees and their dependents are wasteful, and 59% of employers don’t compile or analyze data to track waste (Benfield Gallagher)

  • 53% of employers said they plan to make their pay decisions more transparent in the next three years (WTW)

  • 67% of HR leaders have reevaluated their pay practices this year, with an eye on pay equity (Paychex)

  • 83% of HR leaders now have a discrimination and harassment policy in place with 65% having updated those policies in the last 12 months (Paychex)

  • 34% of organizations increased their benefits offerings in the past year (SHRM)
  • 26% of employers say they plan on increasing benefits in 2018 (LaSalle Network)

  • 51% of employers plan to increase their investments in on-site benefits (Randstad)

  • 90% of employers said the move to a benefits marketplace helped simplify their benefits administration process (WTW)

  • 42% of companies reduced the number of investment options they offer to plan participants over the past three years, and another 41% plan to do so by 2020 (W TW)

  • 6% of organizations decreased benefits during the last 12 months (SHRM)
  • Large organizations (12%) are three times more likely than midsize organizations (4%) to have decreased overall benefits offerings in the past 12 months (SHRM)
  • The cost of employee benefits as part of compensation has gone up 24% between 2001 and 2015 (WTW)
  • 20% of small businesses lack confidence in their organization’s ability to keep up with HR compliance (Paychex)

  • 65% of benefits professionals say they spend less than a year developing their annual benefit plan changes (HUB)
  • More than 50% of small businesses have digitalized a majority of their benefits process (Guardian)

  • Roughly 30% of small business owners have increased their level of administration outsourcing in the last three years, and 24% believe outsourcing will be a top benefits strategy in the next five years (Guardian)

  • 42% of organizations are restructuring their HR operations or revising their strategies to leverage digital tools, and only 51% of that numbers said they’re effective at doing so (Randstad)

  • A little more than 50% of employers said they’re in the transformative stage of digitization, while only 38% described themselves as proficient (Randstad)

  • 85% of employees said employer technology should provide a simple, intuitive user experience (Paychex)

  • 24.5% of employers use technology for non-payroll HR functions, such as education, benefits and communication (LIMRA)
  • 59% of employers are now using a technology platform for insurance benefit enrollment, administration, or both (LIMRA)
  • 77% of employers want a technology system that can manage all of their benefits on the same platform (LIMRA)
  • 53% of benefits professionals say they need a better technology solution to reduce their workload but 36% report that they struggle the most to convince their CEOs/CFOs to make technology investments (HUB)
  • 10% of companies are looking to adopt enrollment technology; 25% want to switch to a new benefits platform (LIMRA)
  • 60% of employees considered their HR technology to be very effective for payroll, retirement and benefits administration (Paychex)
  • 21% of HR leaders are currently leveraging the power of a single HR technology, 48% are using several separate systems with some integrations, 15% are using different systems with no integration, and 15% are still completely manual (Paychex)

  • More than 75% of HR leaders feel their current HR technology solution is improving the overall employee experience (Paychex)

  • 82.37% of employees say their employer provides an employee self-service portal where they can access pay and benefits information online (APA)

  • 73% of full-time U.S. workers expect their employer to provide a high-level of employee self-service, allowing them to independently complete a variety of HR-related tasks (Paychex)

  • 62% of full-time workers in businesses with 50 employees or less said they expect any employer to offer at least some level of HR automation, and 60% of workers in businesses with less than 10 workers expect these offerings (Paychex)

  • More than 65% of companies with 20-500 employees currently offer tools to workers to perform simple administrative HR tasks via self-service, and 46% of companies with fewer than 20 employees are doing the same (Paychex)

  • 53.33% of employees say they prefer to access the portal desktop computer at work, while 10.96% say they prefer to access it via their desktop computer at home; 18.62% via their laptop computer; 12.54% via smartphone; 2.19% via tablet; .63% via telephone; and .26% kiosk at work (APA)

  • Nearly 70% of millennials said a human advisor would deliver a higher return on investment vs 31% that said as much of robo-advisors (LendEDU)

  • 54% of millennials that work with human advisors said getting started on a savings path was easy, but only 38% said their robo-advisor platforms made it easy to get started (LendEDU)

  • Primary factors in assessing HR technology platforms are: low cost (23.9%), employee empowerment (51.5%) and administrative ease (61.4%) (Pacific Resources)

  • 88.8% of employers felt that guided decision support, cost calculators and plan comparison tools were at least somewhat effective (Pacific Resources)

  • 64% of hiring decision makers believe their organization is satisfactory/very satisfactory at clearly setting pay and benefit expectations within job postings (Glassdoor)

  • 83.2% of employers indicated that communication, employee education and engagement are integral to overall benefits delivery (Pacific Resources)

  • 38% of companies (and 53% of large orgs) count on the help of vendors to communicate benefits (AJG)
  • 60% of employees prefer to receive information about company benefits electronically (Jellyvision)
  • 20% of employees say they don’t always keep up with benefits correspondence (Jellyvision)
  • 47% of employees expressed concern that their employer will not offer enough benefit options for the coming year (Securian)

  • 40% of employees fear that their employer may not provide enough information or guidance about available benefits options (Securian)

  • 21% of employees often regret their benefit choices (Jellyvision)
  • 92% of workers last year kept the same selections, and more than 80% spent less than an hour sussing out their options (Aflac)

  • Two-thirds of employees complain that making sense of benefits is too complicated, and nearly three in four employees report there is some part of their coverage they don’t understand (Aflac)

  • More than half of employees estimate they are wasting up to $750 a year because of suboptimal benefit choices (Aflac)

  • 75% of HR executives think their benefits offering are innovative, but only 50% of workers agree (CommonBond)

  • 97% of employees preferred choosing their own benefits, rather than have their employer choose for them (WTW)

  • 74% of employees say that having benefits customized to meet their needs is important when considering taking a new job (MetLife)
  • 67% of employees said they felt confident they signed up for the right benefits (Aflac)

  • 24% of employees could give the correct answers when asked about copays, deductibles and service providers in their network (Aflac)

  • Employees’ benefits knowledge has declined in the past two years, down from 47% in 2015 and 39% in 2016 (Aflac)

  • 67% of American workers are confident they understood everything with the benefits they signed up for (Aflac)

  • 22% of young adults associate benefits with independence, only 19% feel confident, and just 31% say they feel prepared (Aflac)

  • Young adults’ biggest concern about choosing their own health insurance plan is cost (44%) and understanding how health insurance works (36%) (Aflac)

  • 26% of employers are interested in outsourcing employee benefits communications services to a third party (Aflac)
  • 86% of employees work for a company that has a fiscal program in place (Ernst & Young)

  • 52% of HR departments cite controlling benefit costs remains the highest priority; 37% say improving employee engagement, 33% say creating a strong workplace culture (AJG)
  • 81% of benefits professionals selected managing costs as one of their three primary benefits priorities; 50% list helping workers make better benefits decisions (HUB)
  • Four out of five companies say one of their goals is to manage health benefits costs better; 40% do not plan to implement any new cost management programs in the next 12 to 18 months and 50% believe that they’ve done all they can reasonably do to manage costs (HUB)
  • 35% of employee wellness professionals said employers would spend more on wellness programs in 2018, while just 15% stated they would decrease spending (Wellable)

  • When determining benefits investment, 79% of employee wellness professionals cited a competitive benefits plan as an influencer; 77% cited cost (Wellable)

  • 67% of employers expect the Affordable Care Act to be partially repealed, 17% predict total repeal, 9% predict no action (LIMRA)
  • 35% of employers favor a full repeal of the Affordable Care Act, 51% oppose it and 14% have no opinion (Mercer)

  • 48% of employers say the ACA’s total repeal would have little or no effect on their benefits package (LIMRA)
  • 92% of employers would like to permit higher contributions to health spending accounts (Mercer)

  • 87% of employers would like to allow contributions up to the level of the out-of-pocket-maximum (Mercer)

  • 66% of employers would like to allow medications and treatments for chronic conditions to be covered in an HAS-eligible plan before the deductible is met (Mercer)

  • 61% of employers would like to allow free or subsidized services at an onsite clinic before the HAS deductible is met (Mercer)

  • 14% of small business owners had experience with outsourcing HR administration, and 7% didn’t know this was an option (Oasis)

  • 40% of employers outsourced or co-sourced leave administration for the Family Medical Leave Act leave in 2015 while 44% did so in 2018 (Mercer)

  • For small business owners with experience in outsourcing HR administration, the top three services most frequently outsourced were payroll administration (58%), 401(k) (42%), and benefits (40%) (Oasis)

  • 74% of employers claim cost is an important consideration in making benefits decisions (MetLife)
  • 54% of C-level execs say they have more unfilled positions than ever before (Cielo)

  • 65% of C-level execs expect flexible workers, contingent workers and project-based workers will take over a significant amount of the work currently being done by full-time employees (Cielo)

  • More than 60% of employers are considering increasing flexible work options and arrangements, and two-thirds anticipate improving their personalized communication during the next three years (WTW)

  • 45% of micro companies and 53% of small companies utilize social networking to recruit, compared to 73% of large businesses (HireRight)

  • 25% of micro businesses and 50% of small businesses rely on their corporate website to recruit and attract candidates compared to 80% of their large counterparts (HireRight)

  • 15% of micro companies are utilizing a mobile-friendly application and screening process (HireRight)

  • Total talent acquisition, a consistent and comprehensive approach to recruiting and hiring, is a top priority among 90% of C-level execs (Cielo)

  • 63% of U.S. employers (up from 60% last year) plan to increase staffing by hiring more full-time, permanent workers during the second half of 2018 (CareerBuilder)

  • 41% of employers (down from 50% last year) plan to hire contract or temporary workers (CareerBuilder)

  • 28% of employees signed up for voluntary benefits during 2017(Employee Benefit Adviser)

  • 50% of companies agree that "voluntary benefits are a significant part of our company’s benefits strategy" (MetLife
  • 87% of employees offered voluntary benefits felt they mattered to their employers (BenefitsPro)
  • 79% of business and HR leaders said that employee well-being is important, while nearly 49% said the purpose of their well-being programs was about complying with requirements as opposed to being about caring for employees (Deloitte)

  • 83% of workers with healthcare coverage would enroll in a voluntary benefits program without expecting their employer to pay for it (BenefitsPro)
  • 79% of employees see voluntary benefits as necessary (AFLAC)
  • 66% of employer currently add choice in benefit types by offering voluntary benefits, with another 20% planning to or considering (WTW)
  • Percentage of employees who report their employers offer types of voluntary insurance: Life insurance (54%), disability insurance (38%), health savings account (36%), accident insurance (24%), critical illness insurance (15%), and hospital indemnity insurance (9%) (Securian)
  • 12% of employees report being offered none of those benefits (Securian)
  • 75% of employees who have access to life insurance through their employer are enrolled (Securian)
  • 38% of employees are not very confident they made the right benefits decisions at annual enrollment (MetLife)
  • 24% of employers currently create a virtual shopping experience at the time of enrollment, with another 26% planning to or considering (WTW)
  • 55% of employers currently provide decision-support tools for health navigation, with another 26% considering (WTW)
  • 54% of employees claim they need more help understanding how their benefits work, and how those benefits can help meet their needs (MetLife
  • 7% of workers are educated on their healthcare plan (Accenture)

  • 45% of employees strongly agree their companies’ benefit communications helped them to understand how they would pay for specific services and effectively educated them on their benefit options (MetLife)
  • 16% of employers said they are working directly with providers to design health plans (Healthcare Trends Institute)
  • 65% of employees say employers should spend their tax savings on increases in annual and hourly wages (Aon Pulse)

  • 55% of mid to large size employers said they plan on using their tax savings for broad-based expenditures, and 29% plan on allocating savings to employees’ compensation and benefits (Aon Pulse)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 20% of companies have provided enhanced benefits with 35% of those considering further changes to their benefits package (Pearl Meyer)

  • Of companies that have made changes to their benefits in response to the corporate tax cut, 95% said they have made structural changes to compensation first (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 65% of companies handed out $1,000 one-time bonuses to employees, and 46% of employers increased the minimum wage (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 9% of employers enhanced their benefits packages, with an additional 12% of employers increasing their retirement benefits (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 20% of employers are considering making changes to retirement preparation and enhancing benefits (23%) (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 15% of employers are considering reducing healthcare costs (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 52% of employers are not planning any changes to their benefits package because they are unsure of or not anticipating a significant tax benefit (Pearl Meyer)

  • 67% of brokers who were automation leaders ranked integrated benefits management platforms as a top priority to their clients (Maestro Health)

  •  50% of advertising and marketing hiring decision makers think productivity would increase if their organizations adopted a compressed work schedule which would allow employees to work four 10-hr days a week (The Creative Group)

  • 76% of advertising and marketing hiring decision makers said they favor a policy that allows employees to do non-work-related tasks on company time to increase performance (The Creative Group)

  • More than 50% of advertising and marketing hiring decision makers think employers and workers should work together to achieve work-life balance, while just 6% think that goal is the sole concern of the company (The Creative Group)

  • 39% of employees said employers were responsible for creating work-life balance (Robert Half)

  • 26% of business leaders cited work-life balance as an employee concern (Robert Half)

  • HR professionals cite the top two reasons for hiring gig workers as the ability to bring them in for short-term projects and the high-quality, specialized expertise they provide that’s not always found in-house (Korn Ferry)

  • 67% of HR professionals said they are confident about knowing what gig workers do daily, despite the fact that many of these workers do their jobs remotely (Korn Ferry)

  • Two-thirds of HR professionals said they try to integrate contingent workers into the workplace culture (Korn Ferry)

  • Almost 60% of HR professionals think gig workers positively impact the workplace culture (Korn Ferry)

  • More than 60% of employers said it’s difficult to find skilled workers, a little less than half said the same about meeting compensation requirements, and about the same amount have struggled to identify diverse candidates (LaSalle)

  • 49% of employers said it was a challenge to find candidates with hard skills, and 51% experience difficulty in looking for employees with soft skills (LaSalle)

  • 74% of employers said they plan to increase staffing, with 67% stating they plan to add 1- 50 jobs (LaSalle)

  • 75% of leaders believe that AI, robotics and IoT are making fundamental changes within their organization (Deloitte)

  • Almost twice as many employers expect a budget increase for L&D initiatives this year over recent years; 43% anticipate a learning budget bump for 2019 (LinkedIn)

  • 47% of HR professionals found managing performance and providing professional development opportunities challenging; 43% found aligning talent retention strategy with business objectives challenging; and 40% said that handling employee mergers and acquisitions was challenging (XpertHR)

  • Two-thirds of HR leaders agree that the HR function has undergone or is undergoing a digital change (KPMG)

  • 70% of HR leaders recognize the need for workforce transformation, while 40% said they have a digital workplace at the organizational or HR level (KPMG)

  • Almost 40% of HR leaders feel very confident about HR’s ability to transform, and 35% said their company’s current culture is more task-oriented than innovative or experimental (KPMG)

  • 42% of HR leaders agree that readying the workforce for a future with AI will be one of HR’s biggest challenges during the next five years (KPMG)

  • In the next two years, 60% of HR leaders plan to invest in predictive analytics, 53% will invest in enhanced process automation and 47% in AI (KPMG)

  • 90% of HR executives believe that technology will substantially change their organizations’ operations, but less than half feel they have the resources for a digital undertaking (The Hackett Group)

  • 95% of HR professionals said predictive analytics would help their hiring and development efforts, but only a third can access the technology (OutMatch)

  • 69% of high performing talent organizations are more likely to feature clearly defined must-have and nice-to-have skills in their job descriptions (Allegis)

  • 40% of companies with 1,000+ employees outsource their FMLA management as do 27% of companies with 50 or more employees (DMEC)

  • 90% of HR leaders said they now have a voice in company strategy and decision making processes – up 10% from the previous years (Paychex)

Employee Perks and Other Miscellaneous Benefits Stats

  • Millennials are the generation most likely to want in-office perks from their employer (Zoro)

  • Workers are least likely to have nap breaks, unlimited PTO and a company car as benefits (Zoro)

  • About 60% of employers earned a grade of C, D or F at managing employee absence and disability in the workplace (The Standard)

  • 31% of employers benchmark their absence management programs and only 33% benchmark their disability programs (The Standard)

  • More than 50% of organizations lack formal processes for return-to-work and stay-at-work programs (The Standard)

  • 25% of HR professionals report having successful absence and disability management programs (The Standard)

  • 61% of employers said constantly changing disability laws and guidelines make it difficult to properly support employees and comply with the law (The Standard)

  • 23% of employees said their rewards are below or well below those of other companies, up from 15% in 2015 (Alight Solutions)

  • 54% of workers believe their overall total rewards meet their needs or the needs of their family (Alight Solutions)

  • Employees who feel their rewards meet their needs are seven times more likely to be engaged with work compared to employees who don’t feel that way (Alight Solutions)

  • 39% of employees rated themselves as unhappy about their rewards, 26% are happy and 33% are neutral (Peakon)

  • 49% of employees say that receiving perks/benefits means they know that their employers are invested in them as individuals (Clutch)

  • 49.3% of people relocate to seek a higher paying job or career advancement, find a job closer to family (20.5%), or transfer within an existing company (11.1%) (Allied Van Lines)

  • 22.1% of people relocated to work for a company of 1-49 employees, 100-499 employees (20.1%), 1,000-4,999 employees (17.2%), and over 5,000 employees (17.1%)(Allied Van Lines)

  • When relocating for a job, about 26.4% of employees received some moving expenses, 15.75% help with temporary living expenses, 12.05% a discretionary expense allowance, and 8.7% a lump sum for miscellaneous expenses (Allied Van Lines)

  • 29.86% of employees relocating for work received no moving assistance at all from employers (Allied Van Lines)

  • 41.5% of employees said they only had 0-30 days to relocate and settle in before starting their positions, 31-60 days (29.5%), 61-90 days (17.9%), and 91 days or more (11.1%)(Allied Van Lines)

  • 54.6% of people relocating for work believed that the benefits of job relocation outweighed the challenges (Allied Van Lines)

  • Of the 99% of employers that offer relocation or transfer programs, about 40% of their workers said they don’t know about these programs or their employer doesn’t offer them (Topia)

  • More than 20% of workers said they’ve left a job because they were denied the chance to transfer to a new location at the company (Topia)

  • In the past five years, 34% of companies increased their relocation-package offerings to top candidates beyond their geographic area (Robert Half)

  • 30% of companies don’t offer any relocation incentives (Robert Half)

  • 44% of employees cited better pay and perks as the top considerations in their decision to relocate, followed by family or personal reasons (17%), cost of living (16%) and career advancement (16%) (Robert Half)

  • More than 50% of workers who considered leaving said they would reconsider quitting for a chance to relocate, even if they weren’t given more pay or additional benefits (Topia)

  • 64% of millennials say benefits are extremely or very important to employer loyalty (Qualtrics)

  • 50% of millennials are confident they have a strong understanding of their benefits (Qualtrics)

  • Nearly 70% of employees spend an hour or less considering their benefits at enrollment time (Colonial Life)

  • Employees who rush through their benefits choices are 23% less likely to understand their benefits moderately or very well (Colonial Life)

  • 68% of employers are making retirement security a priority, up from 46% in 2013 (WTW)

  • 47% of employees said they value a workspace with a community atmosphere, especially for millennials ages 18-34(55%) (Clutch)

  • 27% of employees found their employers’ L&D offerings to be embedded in the organization, meaningful and useful (Intrepid)

  • Nearly a third of employees called their L&D offerings enthusiastic but off the mark (Intrepid)

  • 41% of employees rated their L&D offerings as something that ticks the box or that’s talked about by execs but never acted upon (Intrepid)

  • 40% of employees age 24 and younger said they’d talk to their boss about making a career change if they had access to additional opportunities to learn and grow within the workplace (LinkedIn)

  • 51% of workers said they are satisfied with their current jobs, but gave their employers’ development opportunities a poor grade (The Conference Board)

  • Private-sector employees spent an average of 34 days on learning last year (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

  • 70% of workers said they would likely participate in an employer-provided training program if it was offered to them (Clutch)

  • 19% of employees want tuition reimbursement for classes, 19% want classes and workshops, 13% prefer job shadowing opportunities, 12% ask for presentations from experts, and 7% want learning resources like books, videos and online courses (Clutch)

  • 50% of employees said it had been a year or more since they were last offered job retraining, 23% said it had been 6-11 months, and 27% were offered training less than six months ago (Clutch)

  • 41% of employees say their employers are training workers in preparation for the future (Axonify)

  • The skills gap grew by 12% last year (Wiley Education & Future Workplace)

  • Nearly two-thirds of HR leaders reported a skills gap in their organizations, up from 52% in 2018 (Wiley Education & Future Workplace)

  • Nearly a third of HR leaders attributed the skills gap to a lack of qualified candidates (Wiley Education & Future Workplace)

  • 90% of HR leaders said they’d hire a job seeker who lacks a four year college degree, though 68% said a degree is useful in validating certain skills (Wiley Education & Future Workplace)

  • 76% of employees said that an employer would be more appealing if it offered additional training designed to develop their skills for the future (Axonify)

  • 32% of employees were satisfied with their career advancement opportunities and 37% were satisfied with their company’s training and learning opportunities (CareerBuilder)

  • 58% of employees thought their company failed to offer enough opportunities to acquire new skills and help them advance in their career (CareerBuilder)

  • 73% of employees whose companies don’t offer education opportunities or workshops outside of work hours said they would likely participate if these learning opportunities were made available (CareerBuilder)

  • Nearly 80% of private-sector workers required some form of on-the-job training in 2018 (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

  • 14% of employees said they would like more training or learning opportunities to improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • Nearly two-thirds of U.S. workers said they want a bigger focus on L&D in their workplaces (City & Guilds Group)

  • 46% of U.S. workers said their employers have provided on-the-job training in the past year, and 52% said it’s easy to access L&D at their jobs (City & Guilds Group)

  • 82% of employees said they feel “fairly well equipped” to do their current jobs, but 63% want a heavier focus on training (City & Guilds Group)

  • 62% of workers have invested personal time in training during the past year, with 30% paying for training out of pocket (City & Guilds Group)

  • Training and development has become one of HR’s top five priorities for the first time, with more HR leaders willing to train and upskill underqualified candidates than in years prior (Paychex)

  • While 98% of employers said they have career development programs in place, there’s a disconnect as almost 80% of workers agreed they were “on their own” to navigate their career development (The Harris Poll)

  • 77% of employers plan to make big investments in learning and development programs to provide workers with new skills for new roles as their businesses grow (SunTrust)
  • 40% of employees age 36 and younger and 67% of baby boomers described their companies’ learning and development programs as excellent (Harvard Business Publishing)

  • 61% of employees want appealing and comfortable workspaces, workplace flexibility (53%), perks (47%) and workspaces that provide learning opportunities (32%) (Clutch)

  • 42% of employees say learning and development is the most important benefit when deciding where to work followed by health insurance (48%) (Udemy)

  • Almost 60% of employers will increase investments in training and development (PayScale)

  • 33% of Americans say employer-provided training doesn’t meet their expectations (Docebo)

  • One in three workers said their employer’s training is out-of-date (Docebo)

  • In the U.S., 32% of workers said training is critical (Docebo)

  • 34% of employees feel it is the employer’s responsibility to pay for training (Udemy)

  • 80% of employees want to acquire more digital skills to guarantee their future employability (Randstad)

  • 45% of millennials are pleased with their career path, and 49% with training and development programs at their company (LaSalle)

  • 76% of employees think their employers should provide them with more training in digital skills, but only 44% said their employers are doing so (Randstad)

  • Employers increased their per-employee spend on training in 2017, up nearly 2% to $1,296 (ATD)

  • Employees averaged over 34 hours of training per year, with technology-based learning accounting for 41% of all time spent learning (ATD)

  • Up to 59% of employees admitted they had no training whatsoever to do their jobs and that their skills had been mostly self-taught (ATD)

  • 90% of employers agreed that it is beneficial to switch from paper-based training to mobile-based training (Inkling and Forrester)

  • More than 85% of employers say employees who have used mobile devices and software or apps specifically designed to train customer-facing employees are better able to meet customer expectations after learning to use such tools (Inkling and Forrester)

  • 59% of employees are, to a certain extent, investing in their own upskilling (Randstad)

  • 90% of employees think employers are mainly responsible for upskilling staff (Coding Dojo)

  • 80% of workers said upskilling was their own responsibility (Randstad)
  • 40% of workers said their employers were helping them develop skills (Gartner)

  • 42% of millennials said their current employers do provide learning, development and training opportunities (Udemy)

  • In entry-level roles, 82% of certified professionals report they’ve been promoted in the past five years vs. 68% of those who aren’t certified (PayScale)

  • 29% of employees said their organization has a formal mentoring program and 37% said they have an informal one (Association for Talent Development)

  • 71% of Fortune 500 companies have formal mentorship programs (ATD)

  • 90% of workers participating in a mentoring program said it helped them develop a positive relationship with another individual in the company (River)

  • 89% of workers participating in a mentoring program said it allowed them to contribute to the success of their company (River)

  • 94% of workers participating in a mentoring program believe that a mentoring program demonstrates an organization’s commitment to provide career options and opportunities (River)

  • 83% of workers participating in a mentoring program admitted that their experience positively influenced their desire to stay at their organization (River)

  • 28% of employees said their employers offer mentorship or leadership programs geared toward women (Randstad)

  • Less than 40% of millennials and 30% of Gen Z workers feel they have the skills they’ll need to succeed, and they’re looking to businesses to help ready them to succeed in this new era (Deloitte)

  • 36% of millennials and 42% of Gen Z reported their employers were helping them understand and prepare for the changes with Industry 4.0 (Deloitte)

  • Career Development and tuition reimbursement policies showed a 1.4% and 1.2% ROE advantage (JUST Capital)

  • 47% of organizations run training and development programs to help build employees’ skills and support career development (Robert Half)

  • 30% of employees have the skills they need to perform their work today and only 20% of employees have the skills needed for both current and future jobs (Gartner)

  • 64% of managers say they don’t think their own employees will be able to keep pace with skills needed in the future (Gartner)

  • Businesses with a strong learning culture enjoy employee engagement and retention rates around 30-50% higher than those that don’t (Robert Half)

  • To foster diversity in the workplace, 49% of minority cybersecurity professionals said mentorship programs are very important (ICMCP)

  • 88% of employees agree it’s important that employers reward employees for great work (AttaCain)
  • 51% of men say their performance is rewarded when they do a good job vs. 41% of women (Mercer)

  • When there was no consistent organizational strategy for recognition in place, the odds of burnout increased by 29% (O.C. Tanner)

  • 26% of employees ranked recognition for their work in their top three factors for staying with their current employer, but 17% said their manager/employer was horrible – they never recognized their work and 43% ranked their manager/employer as just okay – recognizing them annually or quarterly at least (Achievers)

  • 10.8% of workers call their manager/employer awesome and are recognized weekly and 29.4% call them pretty good and are recognized at least once a month (Achievers)

  • New call-to-action49% of employers know which total rewards programs employees value, while 47% know which offerings candidates value (WTW)

  • 41% of employees say their employer effectively rewards employees for great work (AttaCain)
  • 47% of employees want to receive rewards spontaneously (Xexec)

  • 38% of employees want to receive rewards in exchange for good work (Xexec)

  • 52% of employees would rather celebrate rewards with their families than with colleagues (Xexec)

  • 90% of employees who work in places with effective rewards programs agreed with the statement “My work makes a difference” (AttaCain)
  • 76% of employees are enrolled in a vision benefits plan (Transitions Optical)

  • The enrollment breakdown for vision care by generation is: Boomers (84%), Gen X (80%), Millennials (75%) and Gen Z (50%) (Transitions Optical)

  • 95% of executives offered medical insurance, 89% offered dental insurance, 88% offered life insurance, 81% offered vision insurance, 79% offered accidental death and dismemberment and 78% offered disability insurance (Robert Half)

  • 65% of executives offered employee assistance programs, 56% offered reimbursement for tuition/professional certifications, 54% offered health care flexible spending accounts and 46% offered dependent care flexible spending accounts (Robert Half)

  • 42% of executives offered wellness programs, 41% offered health savings or reimbursement accounts, 30% offered long-term care insurance, 16% offered legal services, 11% offered identity theft protection, and 7% offered pet insurance (Robert Half)

  • Job satisfaction rises from 65% for the overall population to 69% among employees in organizations where voluntary benefits are offered, and 75% when enrolled (Aflac)

  • 85% of employees see a growing need for voluntary insurance benefits, a sentiment that has grown significantly and is up from 63% in 2014 (Aflac)

  • Voluntary benefits will meet employees’ diverse needs, from serious illness and identity theft (a 56% increase) and pet insurance (80%) (Benefit Focus)

  • 50% of workers want help getting identity protection services (Alight Solutions)
  • 68% of HR professionals say identity theft benefits are growing in importance (IdentityForce)

  • 67.5% of HR executives are looking for or evaluating identity theft coverage as an employee perk (IdentityForce)

  • 50% of HR professionals currently offer identity theft benefits (IdentityForce)

  • 42% of full-time employees have no employee perks at all (Clutch)
  • 53% of those who do have employee perks say that those perks give them a better quality of life (Clutch)
  • 46% of employees would consider a job that matched their current salary or even paid less (ADP)
  • 90% of millennials would choose to stay in a job for the next 10 years if they knew they'd get annual raises and upward career mobility (Qualtrics)
  • In 2018, 48% of companies offered financial counseling services either online, one on one, or in a classroom setting, up from 28% in 2014 (SHRM)

  • While 23.4% of men wished their company offered continuing education opportunities, 28.4% of women wanted it (Zoro)

  • Of the three formats in which financial education is delivered, online is the most popular as 35% of employers use it, 34% offered one-on-one financial education and 29% offered group or classroom-style learning (SHRM)

  • More than two in five employers report an increased demand for financial education from employees in the past two years (IFEBP)

  • 63% of employers currently provide financial education for their workforce, and an additional 19% are considering such education for the future (IFEBP)

  • Among employers that offer financial education programs, 24% report that they have a financial education budget in 2018, which is significantly higher than the 14% of employers that had such a budget in 2016 (IFEBP)

  • An additional 20% of employers are considering adding a financial education budget, and more than 50% of employers with existing budgets are planning to increase those over the next two years (IFEBP)

  • 17% of employers currently offer financial education around life events like funding education, getting married, purchasing a home, divorce, having a child etc.; 23% are considering doing this in the future (IFEBP)

  • 57% of employers offering financial education report their program is successful, and 6% say their financial education program is unsuccessful (IFEBP)

  • Employers said they’re moving to empower workers saddled with long and short-term money problems with financial education by offering (63%) or thinking about offering (19%) financial education to help their employees manage money, improve their investment decisions, understand their benefits and curb productivity losses caused by money concerns (IFEBP)

  • Saving for retirement, paying for children’s education and handling basic living expenses are negatively impacting the workplace through stress (79%), lack of focus at work (64%), physical health issues (36%) and absenteeism (34%) (IFEBP)

  • Nearly 25% of employers reported having a financial education budget in 2018 vs. 14% in 2016 (IFEBP)

  • 20% of employers are considering adding a financial education budget (IFEBP)

  • In workplaces where a financial education program is offered, 61% of employers indicate that their employees are more financially savvy, and 71% believe that their employees are more prepared for retirement (IFEBP)

  • 34% of employers said they are considering expanding financial education programs for workers (WW)

  • Employees prefer financial benefits, such as profit-sharing (40%), pensions (51%) and monetary bonuses (54%), and would be willing to change jobs to receive these benefits (Gallup)

  • 47% of US employers include financial well-being in their overall workforce well-being strategy; 80% expect to include it by 2018 (WTW)
  • 75% of workers expect their employers to donate money to people in need in their own communities or allow workers to volunteer their time (Glassdoor)

  • 41% of employers are sending current workers back to school to get an advanced degree; 14% fully funding the degree, and 22% funding it partially (CareerBuilder)
  • 40.5% of associations offer employees tuition assistance (ASAE)
  • 22% of employers offer a casual dress code; 40% only relax dress codes on Fridays (IFEBP)
  • One-third of U.S. workers say they participated in no training to improve their skills in the past year (Gartner)

  • 43% of employees who received training found it to be ineffective (Axonify)

  • 93% of employees want training that is easy to complete/understand, 91% want it to be personalized/relevant, and 90% want it to be engaging/fun (Axonify)

  • 89% of employees want training anytime/anywhere they need to do their job, 85% want to be able to choose the training times that fit their schedule, and 80% believe frequent/regular training is more important than formal workplace training (Axonify)

  • 80% of workers feel upskilling is their responsibility; neither they nor their employers are acting on upskilling opportunities (Randstad)

  • A third of U.S. workers said they’ve done nothing to upskill in the past year (Randstad)

  • 67% of employees said they need more skills and training to keep up-to-date (Randstad)

  • 40% of employees said their employers haven’t offered opportunities or paid for upskilling (Randstad)

  • Career development was more important among millennials than work-life balance (Udemy)

  • 61% of workers said their employers are providing upskilling opportunities in the technical and soft skills of the future, only 50% said their employers provide career development opportunities that meet their needs and chances for advancement (APA)

  • 91% of high performers reported that working for an employer that offered learning and development opportunities was important to them (Ceridian)

  • 34% of women are satisfied with career advancement opportunities at their current employer, compared to 44% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • 30% of women do not feel they have the same career advancement opportunities as men who have the same skills and qualifications at their organization, compared to 12% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • A lack of learning opportunities or increase in sense of favoritism can stifle engagement and increase odds of burnout by 16% and 23% (O.C. Tanner)

  • 43% of women are satisfied with training and learning opportunities at their employer vs. 55% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • 40% of employees said they won’t arrange or pay for their own upskilling (Randstad)

  • 51% of employers plan to provide more online, competency-based learning opportunities in 2017 (CareerBuilder)
  • Workers ages 18-34 said career development matters most in accepting a job offer, while workers 55+ cited paid time off as their top factor (Accountemps)

  • 39% of employees say their employer offers career development services (ReportLinker)
  • 57% of HR pros feel challenged to create engaging employee experiences in learning (SilkRoad)
  • 25% of employers offer training to help workers understand the vulnerability of systems and how to avert breaches (Mimecast)

  • Companies’ top 3 challenges are training (44%), planning and budgeting (38%) and technology (37%) (Catalant)

  • 45% of workers believe that company-provided development programs are not applicable to their day-to-day job needs (Spherion)
  • 14% of employees would grade their company an “A” for the availability of training resources (Spherion)
  • 45% of companies say they have increased their investment in training and development programs during the last two years (Spherion)
  • 55% of employees say they think they could advance professionally if they were offered greater training opportunities (American Staffing Association)
  • 90% of adults said employers could do more to train workers to learn in-demand skills (American Staffing Association)

  • 39% of employees want professional development (Unum)

  • 69% of adults said employers fail to provide training (American Staffing Association)

  • 68% of workers say training and development is the most important workplace policy, followed by working hours flexibility (74%), promotion of health at work (72%) (EdenRed)
  • 25% of full-time employees have paid professional development (Clutch)

  • 67% of Gen X leaders said they would like more external coaching and 57% want external development (DDI)

  • 63% of Millennials look for jobs at learning organizations where they will have access to training, workshops, and company-funded postgraduate schooling (Impraise)
  • 46% of employees say their company's training courses/methods make them less likely to leave (CompTIA
  • 35% of employees are concerned about falling behind in acquiring the new skills required to succeed in more advanced future positions (Spherion)
  • Companies that pay for a spouse’s travel has fallen 7% in 2013 to just 2% (SHRM)
  • 59% of companies reimburse employees for internet access on business travel (SHRM)
  • 87% of companies will reimburse traveling employees for taxis or parking; 80% allow for mileage reimbursement for the use of a personal car to travel to and from the airport (SHRM)
  • 66% of employers allow employees to keep hotel points, down from 69% in 2013; 65% allow employees to keep frequent flyer miles, down from 69% in 2013 (SHRM)
  • 76% of companies offer a travel per diem or meal reimbursement, up from 70% in 2013; 9% cover minibar purchases (SHRM)
  • 4% of companies cover pay per view purchases for traveling employees (SHRM)
  • 53% of employees in a recent survey said they were scared to bring up their health condition with their direct supervisor (The Standard)

  • 29% of employees said they feared disclosing their impairments to HR (The Standard)

  • 92% of U.S. employers offer educational benefits (IFEBP)

  • The most common education benefits employers offer include: tuition assistance/reimbursement (63%), in-house training seminars (61%), attendance at educational conferences (51%), continuing education courses (50%), coverage for licensing courses and exams (44%), personal development courses (35%), and 529 college savings plans (10%) (IFEBP)

  • The most common reimbursement amount to employees is $5,000 to $5,999 (IFEBP)

  • 54% of organizations have a payback requirement if the employee leaves within one year of gaining his or her education (IFEBP)

  • 1% to 5% of employees taking advantage of employer-provided tuition reimbursement (IFEBP)

  • 4% of employers currently offer their employees some form of assistance or incentive to repay student loans (SHRM)

  • The top 5 barriers to organizations considering offering student loan repayment benefits are high costs; uncertainty and complexity of implementation; resentment among employees who are done paying off their student loans already; resentment among employees who are in loan debt but ineligible for benefits; and employee turnover after requirements for repayment have been met (IFEBP)

  • 31% of candidates encountered companies that offered some level of student-loan repayment benefits during their job search (Clutch)

  • 4-5% of U.S. companies currently offer student-loan repayment assistance (Clutch)

  • 23% of employees said they are considering implementing student loan repayment benefits in the future (Clutch)

  • It’s anticipated that 34% of employers will offer a student loan consolidation program by 2021, up from 8% in 2018, and 35% of employers will offer student loan refinancing arrangements by 2021, up from 10% in 2018 (WTW)

  • 4% of organizations said they are offering a company-provided student loan repayment benefit, 35% are offering online financial advice services and 34% are offering such sessions in a one-on-one type format (SHRM)

  • Less than 40% of workers believed that counseling for student loan debt could be beneficial; younger workers were more likely to perceive this program, along with budgeting and debt counseling, as useful (EBRI)

  • 78% of workers with student loan debt, including 65% of workers over age 55 with current or future loan debt, want their workplace to offer student loan benefits (CommonBond)

  • While student loan repayment is the most requested financial benefit, it’s only third on HR’s list of priority benefits (CommonBond)

  • 48% of workers are interested in debt counseling, 47% day-to-day budgeting and 39% in student loan debt assistance (EBRI)

  • 4% of employers offer student loan debt repayment (WorldAtWork)
  • 86% of employees said they’d stay with a company for at least five years if their employer helped pay down their student loans (American Student Assistance)
  • 80% of Gen Z employees think they’ll need a bachelor’s degree to get their dream job but only 30% think they’ll be able to repay their student loans (InsideOut)

  • 95% of employers offer coverage to opposite-sex partners and 85% offer it to same-sex partners (SHRM)
  • 81% of employers already offering financial assistance said the benefit would apply to same-sex couples next year, compared with 65% in 2017 (WTW)

  • 31% of employers provide benefits to same-sex partners in civil unions, down from 51% in 2014 (IFEBP)
  • 48% of employers provide benefits to same-sex domestic partners, down from 59% in 2014 (IFEBP)
  • 75% of employers offer contraceptive coverage, down from 82% in 2013 (SHRM)
  • 24% of employers offer in-vitro fertilization coverage (SHRM)
  • Programs addressing fertility are up 35% points from 2016 to 2018; neonatal and first year of life are both up 27% (Optum)

  • 21% of employers offer an app-based mobile phone fertility or maternity program, with 16% offering it through the health plan and 5% through other vendors (WTW)

  • 66% of employers say they expect to offer fertility benefits by 2019 (WTW)

  • 86% of companies that published diversity and equal opportunity policies showed an ROE advantage of 2.5% (JUST Capital)

  • Disclosure of diversity and equal opportunity targets netted a 2.4% ROE advantage (JUST Capital)

  • 23% of organizations have a formal diversity and inclusion policy (TCRS)

  • 71% of employers who currently provide fertility benefits report they do so to support inclusion and diversity goals; 59% are hoping to recruit and retain top talent; 49% are aiming to create a woman-friendly workplace (WTW)

  • Fertility coverage for same-sex couples will hit 81% among employers offering fertility benefits by 2019 (WTW)

  • 82% of businesses that currently offer fertility coverage say they will make no changes in 2018; 17% expect to enhance offerings and 1% plan to decrease benefits (WTW)

  • A little less than one-third of employers with 500 or more employees offer some type of fertility benefit, while 41% of employers of all sizes offer paid maternity leave and 32% offer paid paternity leave (IFEBP)

  • 34% of employers offer unpaid family leave beyond what’s required by the Family and Medical Leave Act (IFEBP)

  • Family-friendly benefits that have seen increases during the past two years include dependent care and flexible spending accounts (+5%), resource and referral services for child care (+5%), Take Your Child to Work Day (+6%), financial assistance for adoption (+1%), and 529 education plans (+5%) (IFEBP)

  • 25% of workers said work-life balance is the most important aspect of how their company connects with them (Speakap)

  • 11% of workers have refused a new job due to a lack of good work-life balance opportunities, while around 75% of workers would carefully consider their childcare arrangements before taking a promotion or new job (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 8% of full-time workers receive some kind of childcare stipend (Clutch)

  • 9% of men are likely to use child care vs. 2% of women (Businessolver)

  • 42% of companies offer onsite lactation rooms (SHRM)
  • 75% of employers believe that caregiving benefits will become more important to their companies over the next five years (SHRM)
  • 4% of benefits managers say caregiving benefits are within their top 10 priorities for employee health and benefit issues; 12% say it’s within their top five priorities (NEBGH)
  • About 10% of workers said they’d prefer a more relaxed dress code or activities like picnics and potlucks as a summer perk (Accountemps)

  • 14% of senior managers said they do not offer any summer perks for employees (Acountemps)

  • 41% of employees ranked bonuses as their most preferred holiday perk (Spherion)

  • 46% of employees said their employers don’t give out any type of monetary holiday gifts (Spherion)

  • Holiday Perks in order of popularity include: a holiday party (36%), extra time off (28%), holiday bonus (26%), office close-down between Christmas and New Year’s Day (22%), an employee gift exchange (18%) and an employer-paid holiday meal (18%) (Spherion)

  • 71% of employers are planning on a holiday party for employees, compared with 69% last year (CareerBuilder)

  • 94% of workers want a gift from their employers to make them feel valued, appreciated and happy this Christmas (instantprint)

  • More than 73% of employees didn’t care to have company retreats and charitable donation matching programs added to their benefits package (Zoro)

  • The most in-demand gifts that employees would like to receive from their employers during the holidays include: gift vouchers (29%), an early finish (28.8%), free bar at company Christmas party (20%), a physical gift (10.3%) and a charitable donation made in their name (7%) (instantprint)

  • IT professionals would prefer an early finish this festive period, with 35% in the IT department choosing this as their ideal Christmas gift (instantprint)

  • 11% of senior management would like a charitable donation to be made in their name, compared to the average demand for this present of just 7% (instantprint)

  • 33% of women want gift vouchers as the ideal present versus 23% of men (instantprint)

  • 22% of male employees prefer a free bar as the ideal present versus 18% of women (instantprint)

  • 55% of employers are buying employees gifts this year (CareerBuilder)

  • 55% of companies offer a “sit-to-stand” ergonomic desk or treadmill workstation (Fidelity)
  • 54% of employees say their workplace offers paid family sick leave or bereavement (ReportLinker)
  • 16% of employers offer free snacks (ReportLinker)
  • 65% of consumers would be interested if their employer offered easy and affordable access to genetic testing for health purposes (Wamberg)

  • 26% of consumers want genetic testing as a voluntary benefit but only if it is free (Wamberg)

  • 9% of consumers would have no interest in an employer offer of access to genetic testing (Wamberg)

  • 88% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces plan to stay at the company for the next 12 months vs. 73% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 72% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces would decline a job offer with another company at similar pay vs. 44% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel fully engaged with their work vs. 65% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 90% of employees in pet friendly workplaces and less than 65% of employees in non-friendly workplaces feel highly connected to their company’s mission, fully engaged with their work and willing to recommend their employer to others (Nationwide)

  • More than three times as many employees at pet friendly workplaces report a positive working relationship with their boss and co-workers (Nationwide)

  • 83% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel their work is rewarding and exciting vs. 46% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 88% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces would recommend their place of employment to others vs. 51% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel the company supports their physical health and wellness and 89% feel the company supports their mental well-being vs. 59% and 53% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 52% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces report a positive working relationship with their supervisor and 53% with their co-workers vs. 14% and 19% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 85% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces rarely miss a day of work for well-being and/or recuperation vs. 77% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 15% of employees wants pet insurance and 15% want pet friendly offices (Unum)

  • 28% of employees want ID theft prevention and 16% want public transit assistance (Unum)

 

Written by: Ashley Autry


Ashley Autry is a Marketing Professional at Access Development. She's an expert proofer, gatherer of loyalty stats, research guru, writing queen, and overseer of various marketing projects.

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