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The race to acquire, engage and retain employees is as intense as ever

Unemployment is low. Competition is high. Turnover is expensive.

What makes employees stay? Or leave?

What makes them happy and engaged? Or angry and frustrated?

You can guess. Or you can arm yourself with some data.

For data, you've come to the right place. We're compiling every relevant piece of data regarding what inspires loyalty and causes churn, as well as what makes them satisfied or upset with their employer.

Check the stats out here:

Of course, all of these statistics will also find their way onto our Ultimate Collection of Employee Engagement & Loyalty Statistics.

Stats related to Millennials will also be added to our database of Millennial Employee Engagement & Loyalty Statistics.

Looking for employee benefits and perks stats? We've got those too.

Have data you'd like to see on these pages? Drop us a link in the comments.

This page is brought to you courtesy of Access Perks, our employee discount program built for small- and medium-sized businesses. Click here to check it out and learn more

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2018 Employee Engagement/Retention Statistics

  • 15% of employees worldwide are engaged in their jobs (Gallup)

  • 59% of employees say they’ve been with their current employer for more than 3 years and among older millennials (ages 30-37), 22% have been with their current employer for more than 7 years (Udemy)

  • 42% of employees say learning and development is the most important benefit when deciding where to work followed by health insurance (48%) (Udemy)

  • Offering career training and development would keep 86% of millennials from leaving their current position (Bridge)

  • If a job lacks growth opportunities and avenues for leadership development, 67% of millennials would leave that position (Bridge)

  • 7% of the world’s 3.3 billion adults who are working or looking for work have a great job (Gallup)

  • Of the 5 billion people on the planet, only 1.4 billion have a good job, and just 16% of those are engaged (Gallup)

  • Employee engagement levels bounced back to an all-time high rate of 65% in 2017, up 2% from 2016 (Aon)

  • Almost 25% of millennials have worked for 5 different employers (O.C. Tanner)

  • Among millennials who worked at 5-7 organizations, 34% didn’t trust their direct manager, 31% said their organizations don’t set goals, and 48% said their organization thought only about profits (O.C. Tanner)

  • 39% of workers would work harder if they are happy in their current role or place of work (One4all)

  • 79% of UK workers believe their boss or manager does not care about their happiness, and only 30% would consider leaving their current role if they were unhappy at work (One4all)

  • 42% of L&D professionals who indicated their employees were highly engaged in learning were also highly engaged overall at the organization (Findcourses.com)

  • 12% of businesses are happy with current levels of employee engagement (CBI)

  • Distraction at work is a problem for 69% of full-time employees (Udemy)

  • 60% of employees said that meetings are a source of distraction (Udemy)

  • 77% of workers said they’d be more likely to accept a job offer if they knew they could telecommute at least some of the time (Robert Half)

  • 86% of employees between the ages 18-34 said they’d sooner sign a contract with remote work options (Robert Half)

  • 65% of employees older than 55 said they’d sooner sign a contract with remote work options (Robert Half)

  • 40% of employees said that flexible/remote work options can lower workplace distractions, and 52% say they’re more productive when working remotely (Udemy)

  • 77% of employees reported they are more productive when working away from the office (Upwork)

  • 70% of employees believe training could help them become more focused on the job and better at managing their time, but 66% have never asked their managers for such training (Udemy)

  • 55% of businesses think that stronger engagement would improve their ability to either retain, recruit or carry out succession planning (CBI)

  • 44% of businesses think improved employee engagement would lead to them better being able to retain, whilst 36% think it would have a positive impact on recruitment (CBI)

  • 47% of businesses believe that recent pension freedoms have led to employees being more engaged (CBI)

  • 42% of businesses report that pension provision has a positive impact on employee retention (CBI)

  • 82% of employees are continuously looking for opportunities elsewhere and 40% expect to have four to six jobs in their work life (Jobvite)

  • A third of job seekers left a job within 90 days; 43% of that group said their day-to-day role wasn’t what they thought it would be; 34% said they were driven away by a bad experience or incident; 32% cited company culture; and 11% said they signed onto a new job but later changed their minds (Jobvite)

  • 45% of employees reported having either changed jobs in the past 12 months or planned to do so in the next year; in 2017, 18% said they planned to switch jobs but 27% actually did (Randstad)

  • 18% of North American employees said they planned to switch jobs in 2017 but 26% actually did (Randstad)

  • 32% of employees would take a 10% pay cut for a job they’re more interested in or passionate about (Jobvite)

  • Top reasons for leaving a job: insufficient pay (44%), limited career paths (43%), lack of challenging work (30%), work-life balance (28%), and lack of recognition (27%) (Randstad)

  • 11% of workers have refused a new job due to a lack of good work-life balance opportunities, while around 75% of workers would carefully consider their childcare arrangements before taking a promotion or new job (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 64% of millennials say benefits are extremely or very important to employer loyalty (Qualtrics)
  • 50% of adults would leave their current job for better benefits (Yoh)

  • 42% of adults said they’d jump ship for a flexible work option (Yoh)

  • 89% of employers said flexible working options are important when it comes to staff attraction and retention (Hays)

  • 33% of employees said flexible working options were critical to their remaining in employment (Hays)

  • 44% of workers said they would leave their current job for one that pays more (OfficeTeam)

  • Employees said they would leave their current job because: they want to find an organization with a higher purpose/stronger mission (12%); they are feeling unappreciated (12%); they feel bored or unchallenged (12%); they have a long commute (7%); it’s a bad culture fit (7%) or have a bad boss (6%) (OfficeTeam)

  • Roughly one-third of adults would leave their job for a higher-level position, a better company culture or a shorter commute (Yoh)

  • 83% of employees say health insurance is very or extremely important in deciding whether to stay in or change jobs (EBRI)

  • 15% of adults said they wouldn’t leave their current job for any reason (Yoh)

  • 47% of higher educated workers said a limited career path could get them to leave for a better opportunity (Randstad)

  • 29% of professionals plan to look for a new position in the next 12 months (Accountemps)

  • 24% of Gen Xers say the desire for financial stability motivates them to stay in a job (Purchasing Power)
  • 54% of underemployed workers are actively looking for a better-paying full-time job (Snag)

  • 14% or roughly 4.5 million workers are likely to move on to a new job (Robert Half)

  • 33% of professionals selected “I’m bored, need new challenge” as their motivation for moving on to another job (Korn Ferry)

  • Businesses with a strong learning culture enjoy employee engagement and retention rates around 30-50% higher than those that don’t (Robert Half)

  • 83% of workers participating in a mentoring program admitted that their experience positively influenced their desire to stay at their organization (River)

  • 70% of executives say employees’ desire for purpose is impacting HR’s ability to recruit and retain top talent (69%), and 65% report it is transforming traditional approaches to talent recruitment and development, including compensation packages (Covestro)

  • 68% of executives believe their employees would be more engaged in their work and perform at higher levels if they had opportunities to be challenged by working on purpose projects inside and/or outside the company (Covestro)

  • 62% of executives see SBV (small teams of employees engaging in short-term consulting projects that aid nonprofit organizations and their causes) as a way to attract top talent, increase employee engagement (70%), and develop future leaders at their companies (80%) (Covestro)

  • 93% of nonprofit employees are engaged at work, a rate triple the national average (Work for Good)

  • 85% of employees who switched from for-profit organizations to nonprofits said they planned to remain in the nonprofit sector for the rest of their careers (Work for Good)

  • 75% of executives believe that in the next decade, in order to recruit and retain talent, compensation alone will not be enough (Covestro)

  • 60% of companies offer wellness programs to stay competitive when attracting and retaining employees vs. 14% of those companies with no identified culture of health (Optum)

  • 56% of Americans said their health plan is the reason they’ve stayed at their current job (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 72% of workers didn’t accept the rationale for why they didn’t get a raise, and 71% who received no rationale said they planned to look for a new job within six months (PayScale)

  • Of employees that received some rationale as to why they didn’t get a raise, just over 25% actually believed it and of those who didn’t believe the rationale or didn’t receive one, more than 70% said they planned to seek a new job in the next six months (PayScale)

  • 57% of employees who believed the rationale they were given when not getting a raise and 42% of employees who did receive the raise they requested were planning to leave their job (PayScale)

  • Money is the number one motivator for 67% of job seekers and employees looking elsewhere for career opportunities (Glassdoor)

  • 45% of hiring decision makers note that salary is the top reason for employees changing jobs (Glassdoor)

  • 48% of hiring decision makers note salary and compensation is the most influential factor for a candidate decision on where to work (Glassdoor)

  • 59% of Gen Z and 7% of baby boomers would have to remain with an employer for between 1-4 years to consider it to be long-term employment (Sharefile)

  • 38% of baby boomers would have to remain with an employer for 11+ years to consider it to be long-term employment (Sharefile)

  • 34% of Gen Z and 12% of baby boomers said the best way to get to where I want to be is by moving from company to company (Sharefile)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 65% say they feel strongly about working for their organization a year from now, compared to 51% who don’t take a week off in the summer (O.C. Tanner)

  • 53% of employees said they don’t expect to stay at their companies beyond five years (Nintex)

  • 37% of Gen X contemplate leaving to advance their careers, 5% lower than millennials (DDI)

  • 56% of millennials believe that an individual should stay at a single company for more than 20 years (Bridge)

  • 43% of millennials envision leaving their jobs within 2 years, and 28% are looking to stay beyond 5 years (Deloitte)

  • 62% of millennials who would willingly leave their employers within the next 2 years regard the gig economy as a viable alternative to full-time employment (Deloitte)

  • 61% of Gen Z employees say they would leave their current jobs within 2 years if given the choice (Deloitte)

  • 59% of Gen Z would expect to stay with their current employer for less than 2 years (Deloitte)

  • 50% of employees say 1-2 years is the right length of time to stay in a job before looking for another (Ajilon)

  • 25% of employees are actively looking for new job opportunities and 55% are passively open to new opportunities (Ajilon)

  • 43% of employees said they would leave their current jobs for another that paid better (Ajilon)

  • 54% of employees said their main reason for staying on the job is their loyalty to their coworkers, team, boss or company (Ajilon)

  • A third of employees said their reason for leaving their job was a bad boss or manager (Ajilon)

  • Nearly 20% of 24-35 year olds said reputation for ethical behavior, diversity and inclusion as well as workplace wellbeing were important when choosing an employer (Deloitte)

  • Millennials and Gen Z working for employers perceived to have diverse workforces and senior management teams are more likely to want to stay 5 or more years (Deloitte)

  • Among Millennial and Gen Z employees who said they intend to stay with their current employers for at least 5 years, 55% note greater flexibility in where and when they work now compared to 3 years ago (Deloitte)

  • 19% of professionals cited more money as their reason for job hunting (Korn Ferry)

  • Of the 27 markets surveyed, Los Angeles, CA (40%); Austin, TX (38%); and Dallas, TX (37%) topped the list of U.S. cities with the most workers planning to find new opportunities (Accountemps)

  • If offered financial programs at work, 89% of Gen Xers would participate in them (Purchasing Power)
  • 35% of hiring decision makers expect more employees to quit over the next 12 months (Glassdoor)

  • 91% of employees stick around for at least a year at a new company, and 69% of them stick around for at least 3 years if the company has a well-structured onboarding program (TLMM)

  • Organizations with poorly handled onboarding are twice as likely to cause new hires to seek new opportunities in the near future (Digitate)

  • The new hire onboard experience sets a tone which, if negative, can leave 25% of new hires unlikely to recommend the employer to a family member or friend (Digitate)

  • 60-70% of employee turnover is voluntary (ADP)

  • Workers at technology laggards were 450% more likely to want to leave to go work elsewhere (Unisys)

  • About 40% of workers said they left a company because they lacked access to state-of-the-art digital tools and 58% said they need to work elsewhere to gain digital skills (Randstad)

  • Factors influencing workers to join a company are its use of the most up to date tools (80%), innovative culture (72%) and reputation as a leader in digitization (62%) (Randstad)

  • Employers say there’s a 40% turnover rate among workers (CareerBuilder)

  • HR directors have a 43% switch rate (Indeed)

  • The lowest career-switching rates were among computer programmers and engineers, with Java developers (8%) and network engineers (25%) being the least likely to leave their careers (Indeed)

  • 47% of HR leaders cited employee turnover and retention as their top challenge (Globoforce)

  • 27% of HR managers said that how employees leave greatly affects their careers; 56% said there’s somewhat of an effect, and 16% said there’s no effect at all (OfficeTeam)

  • More than 70% of HR professionals believe outmoded work practices, sketchy career paths and limits on advancement, development and mentoring are impacting attrition and 69% identified flexible work schedules, wellness programs, fast-track promotions and other perks as problematic (Allegis Group)

  • Turnover rates in business leadership positions are far higher for women (31%) than for men (24.1%) (The Network of Executive Women)

  • Attrition rates globally across other sectors are 8% to 10% annually (The Network of Executive Women)

  • 37% of hiring decision makers say retention rates would increase significantly if new hires were better informed during the hiring process (Glassdoor)

  • To overcome technology gaps, employers said they plan to adopt change management strategies and new technologies to attract specialized or highly skilled talent (75%), find talent that can do the work faster (62%), speed up talent acquisition (57%) and reduce reliance on costly brand-name consulting firms (40%) (Catalant)

  • 31% of retail employees said that training makes them feel extremely engaged (Axonify)

  • Millennial managers are nearly two-thirds less likely to resign (11.9%) than non-manager millennials (36.2%) (Visier)

  • Millennial managers who haven’t been promoted resign at a rate of 5.2% higher than the average, while millennial managers who were promoted in the last two years resign at a rate of 3.1% below average (Visier)

  • 22% of millennials job hop within a company nearly twice as often as other generations (12%) (Visier)

  • Men who haven’t been promoted resign at a rate of 1.7% higher than the average, while women resign at a rate of only .7% (Visier)

  • 63% of employees believe managers are most responsible for sharing engagement-based results to teams (Quantum Workplace)

  • 60% of employees said managers are most responsible for implementing employee engagement strategies (Quantum Workplace)

  • Employees with all three of these elements – good fit, high engagement, 10+ years at an organization – perform 18% higher than the average employee and 35% higher than a worker who lacks all three elements (Gallup)

  • 5% of employees have the right fit, high engagement and 10+ years at the same organization (Gallup)

  • 6% of workers have left a job because a romantic relationship with someone at work went sour (9% of women vs. 3% of men) (CareerBuilder)

  • Women who strongly agree they have a best friend at work are more than twice as likely to be engaged (63%) compared with the women who say otherwise (29%) (Gallup)

  • Two out of ten U.S. employees strongly agree they have a best friend at work. By moving this ratio to six in ten, organizations could realize 36% fewer safety incidents, 7% more engaged customers and 12% higher profit (Gallup)

  • 88% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces plan to stay at the company for the next 12 months vs. 73% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 72% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces would decline a job offer with another company at similar pay vs. 44% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel fully engaged with their work vs. 65% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 90% of employees are more likely to stay with an organization that empathizes with their needs (Businessolver)

  • Nearly 80% of employees would consider leaving their current organization if it started being less empathetic (Businessolver)

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2018 Workplace Satisfaction Statistics

  • 60% of employees report being stressed all or most of the time at work (Udemy)
  • 36% of parents are willing to take a pay cut, while 41% of millennial parents intended to downshift to a less stressful job (Working Families)

  • 78% of HR leaders report feeling stressed at work in both 2017 and 2018 (Paychex)

  • 30% of workers said they would be more willing to work overtime or for longer when they are happy (One4all)

  • 38% of workers say their happiness impacts their performance at work (One4all)

  • 44% of workers said their employers could improve their happiness by awarding a pay raise of 25%, and 33% said their happiness would improve with a 10% raise (One4all)

  • Women of color are 19% less likely to receive a raise than white men and men of color are 25% less likely (PayScale)

  • 70% of workers received a wage increase with 39% receiving the amount they asked for and 31% receiving less (PayScale)

  • A third of workers reported getting a raise before they requested one (PayScale)

  • Among the employees who were told a budget couldn’t accommodate their pay increase, only 22% believed this rationale (PayScale)

  • As long as workers believe their employer’s rationale for not giving them a raise, 50% had the same level of job satisfaction as employees who received a raise (PayScale)

  • 33% of employees who were denied a raise were provided no rationale (PayScale)

  • 65% of workers ages 18-24 say they prefer working in a traditional office environment (Randstad)

  • 82% of U.S. workers say the ability to work from anywhere at any time allows them to maintain a healthy work/life balance, 62% still prefer to work in the office (Randstad)

  • 66% of workers say they like the option of occasionally working from home or another location, but aren’t able to do so (Randstad)

  • 36% of workers report their workplaces support working from home anytime and anywhere they want (Randstad)

  • Technology tops the list of what fulfills employees’ basic needs: a work computer/laptop/device (75%); fast internet and Wi-Fi (68%); office space/cubicle space (55%); and air conditioning and heating (47%) (Randstad)

  • The top factors cited for job satisfaction were: having the latest digital and technology skills; savings or financial assistance programs and vacation (Randstad)

  • 81% of employees say they prefer that financial wellness be offered as a bundled program rather than as stand-alone resources (Bank of America)

  • Only 7% of employees identify healthcare as an important building block of financial wellness, yet 53% have skipped or postponed at least one healthcare need to save money (Bank of America)

  • More than 50% of digital workers at technology laggard organizations expressed frustration with their employer vs. 6% of workers at technology leader organizations (Unisys)

  • 45% of employers complain that outdated versions keep them from being productive (Unisys)

  • Employees who work in fully-enabled digital workplaces where new workplace technologies are in widespread use were 51% more likely to have strong job satisfaction, 43% more likely to be positive about their work-life balance, 60% more likely to say they are motivated at work, and 91% more likely to praise their company’s vision (Aruba)

  • 73% of employees who work in a fully-enabled digital workplace reported a positive impact on their productivity and 70% cited improved collaboration thanks to digital technologies vs. 55% those who don’t work in a fully-enabled digital workplace (Aruba)

  • 71% of employees said they would welcome a fully automated workplace in the future (Aruba)

  • 35% of employees disagree that their employers provide the necessary technical equipment to enable them to work from home (Randstad)

  • 80% of workers say they like agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) because it increases their productivity, creativity and job satisfaction (Randstad)

  • 68% of men and 72% of women say work is more than just a means to making a living (Sharefile)

  • 69% of men and 64% of women said they feel valued by their employers (Sharefile)

  • 47% of employees said they value a workspace with a community atmosphere, especially for millennials ages 18-34(55%) (Clutch)

  • 40% of employees age 36 and younger and 67% of baby boomers described their companies’ learning and development programs as excellent (Harvard Business Publishing)

  • 61% of employees want appealing and comfortable workspaces, workplace flexibility (53%), perks (47%) and workspaces that provide learning opportunities (32%) (Clutch)

  • 48% of office workers said peer collaboration is their preferred method of learning in the workplace and 81% said that peer collaboration helped improve their productivity (Braidio)

  • 21% of UK workers said being thanked by bosses for a job well done more often would increase the morale (One4all)

  • 20% of UK workers said increased recognition from their boss for their work and the contributions they make would make them happier in the workplace (One4all)

  • 53% of employees would not feel confident discussing family-related issues with their employer (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 23% of workers have reduced their working hours to try and get a better fit between work and family life vs. 14% who work flexibly on an informal basis to achieve this (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 31% of workers are effectively prevented from working flexibly, and 35% who do work flexibly state that their work-life balance is not ideal for them or their family (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 69% of Gen Z said flexible hours (69%) are a valued employee benefit, along with free health care (23%) and the option to work remotely (18%) (Sharefile)

  • 44% of workers feel that flexible working is a genuine work-life balance option for parents in their workplace; however, 34% of workers have faked being ill in order to meet family obligations (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • Around 47% of workers believe that work affects their ability to spend time with family, and 72% of workers bring work home in the evenings or at weekends (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 14% of professionals said they resent their employer for their treatment of vacation time (Office Pulse)

  • 34% of workers feel resentful towards their employer with regards to work-life balance; this increases to 46% for male millennial workers (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 53% of workers cite work as the main cause for being burned out, compared to 12% who blame family life (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 41% of millennial workers intend to downshift into a less stressful job to gain a better fit between work and family life (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 36% of millennial workers plan to take a pay cut to work fewer hours (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 88% of employees said company culture was at least relatively important (Jobvite)

  • 74% of men and 79% of women said they have a good work/life balance (Sharefile)

  • 37% of workers think employers should make efforts to change organizational culture to ensure a good work-life balance, 35% believe more policies that support work-life balance should be implemented and 28% feel that employers should encourage their staff to use existing policies to help their work-life balance (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 45% of professionals feel their company does not promote a healthy work/life balance (Execu│Search)

  • 34% of parents felt resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance, with more fathers than mothers expressing this sentiment (37% vs. 32%) (Working Families)

  • 46% of millennial fathers feel resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance (Working Families)

  • 81% of parents who said they worked flexibly said they still had to bring work home at evenings or weekends (Working Families)

  • 70% of workers say they are very/somewhat confident about covering medical expenses this year vs. 77% in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 80% of workers say they were very/somewhat confident about covering basic expenses this year compared to 85% in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 19% of U.S. workers are satisfied with their current salaries (Indeed)

  • 60% of U.S. workers said it would take an extra $6,000 per year to feel comfortable/satisfied with their job (Indeed)

  • More than 21% of men were dissatisfied with their earnings, compared with 16% of women (Indeed)

  • 54% of women found out they were being paid less than a male peer in the same role, compared to 19% of men who learned they were paid less than a colleague (Hired)

  • A third of women do not believe they are making as much as their male counterparts even though they have similar experience and qualifications; 12% of men feel the same way (CareerBuilder)

  • 35% of women don’t expect to reach a salary over $50,000 during their career, compared to 17% of men, while 47% of men expect to reach a six-figure salary, compared to 22% of women (CareerBuilder)

  • 38% of U.S. hourly workers who make $20 or less per hour say they’re struggling to make ends meet (Snag)

  • 80% of underemployed workers are willing to work more than one job to earn a living wage, but 74% would prefer having one full-time, decent-paying job (Snag)

  • 47% of restaurant workers, 41% of retail workers and 38% of hospitality workers consider themselves underemployed (Snag)

  • 50% of global workers often worry about their future financial state, and two-thirds said they felt their future financial state would be worse off relative to that of their parents’ generation (WTW)

  • 50% of employees over 55 and 59% of those ages 18-34 believe their employers should be doing more to guarantee their financial stability in retirement (Cebr)

  • 68% of workers want comprehensive financial planning to help them plan for healthcare costs in retirement and figure out how much they need to save for their post-work years (EBRI)

  • 80% of employees who ranked their benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high also ranked job satisfaction as extremely or very high (EBRI)

  • Nearly two-thirds of employees who ranked benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high ranked their moral as excellent or very good (EBRI)

  • 75% of HR executives think their benefits offering are innovative, but only 50% of workers agree (CommonBond)

  • 73% of full-time U.S. workers expect their employer to provide a high-level of employee self-service, allowing them to independently complete a variety of HR-related tasks (Paychex)

  • 62% of full-time workers in businesses with 50 employees or less said they expect any employer to offer at least some level of HR automation, and 60% of workers in businesses with less than 10 workers expect these offerings (Paychex)

  • 78% of workers with student loan debt, including 65% of workers over age 55 with current or future loan debt, want their workplace to offer student loan benefits (CommonBond)

  • Gen Xers are slightly more satisfied with their benefits than millennials (53% vs 52%), and 49% of boomers report they are satisfied with their benefits (LIMRA)

  • 52% of employees say they understand their health benefits and 43% indicate they understand their non-health benefits very/extremely well (EBRI)

  • 50% of millennials are confident they have a strong understanding of their benefits (Qualtrics)

  • 31% of employees indicate their employer or benefits company provides no education or advice on benefits (EBRI)

  • 39% of employees state that their employer provides education on how health insurance works, 24% say that their employer provides education n how a health savings account works, and 28% confirm that their employer offers education on how to invest money in their retirement plan (EBRI)

  • 71% of Americans are satisfied with their current employer-sponsored health plan (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 54% of professionals’ career choices are motivated by seeking a healthy work/life balance (Execu│Search)

  • Despite claiming to have a physical health problem when calling in sick, UK employees admit it’s actually stress (21%), anxiety (18%) and/or depression (20%) (BHSF)

  • 42% of employees have called in sick claiming a physical illness when in reality it’s a mental health issue (BHSF)

  • 56% of employees admitted to suffering from stress, 36% from anxiety and 25% from depression (BHSF)

  • 43% of workers report they are often or always stressed, and one-third of these employees said the stress they experience at work is detrimental to their health (TSheets)

  • Saving for retirement, paying for children’s education and handling basic living expenses are negatively impacting the workplace through stress (79%), lack of focus at work (64%), physical health issues (36%) and absenteeism (34%) (IFEBP)

  • 49% of employees said their stress levels were either above average or high (WTW)

  • Only 26% of employees discuss their issues with their managers, and 25% turn to employer-provided services (WTW)

  • More than 50% of workers think employers aren’t preparing workers for future tech jobs (Coding Dojo)

  • 90% of employees think employers are mainly responsible for upskilling staff (Coding Dojo)

  • 57% of employees said they don’t have basic coding skills and 12% said they aren’t tech literate at all and that they struggle with basic applications (Coding Dojo)

  • 61% of current tech workers say they are underpaid (Blind)

  • A little over one-third of tech workers said they were paid fairly and 5% said they were overpaid for their position (Blind)

  • 41% of tech employees feel they are paid unfairly (Blind)

  • 60% of tech workers said their current employer discourages talk about salary between co-workers (Blind)

  • Nearly 60% of tech workers suffer from on-the-job burnout (Blind)

  • The burnout rate for 25 out of 30 tech companies is 50% or higher (Blind)

  • 32% of workers say they feel pressured not to take time off (TSheets)

  • 48% of employees said they do not get enough time off (TSheets)

  • 40% of employers that made the switch from vacation and sick time to PTO reported that employees were more present (WorldatWork)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 70% say they’re driven to contribute to their organization’s success, as opposed to the 55% who don’t regularly take a week of vacation (O.C. Tanner)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 63% say they have a sense of belonging at their company, compared to 43% who skip at least a week of vacation time (O.C. Tanner)

  • 50% of workers said companies don’t need to go to a greater extent to help them “switch off” when not at work; 28% said companies should “somewhat” go to a greater extent to help them “switch off” and 22% said companies should “very” to “extremely” go to a greater extent to help them “switch off” (IBM)

  • Stress levels were found to be higher among employees who do not get PTO and 51% of them say they are often or always stressed, with 58% describing it as unhealthy (TSheets)

  • 89% of employees come to work sick with 19% admitting to doing this more than once a month (TSheets)

  • 16% of American workers say they get no PTO at all compared to 14% of Australian workers and just 8% of Canadian workers (TSheets)

  • 11% of ages 55+ get no PTO compared to 25% of 18-24 year olds (TSheets)

  • 46% of employees admit that work is the main cause of their mental health problems and 15% would tell their boss if they were struggling with an issue of this nature (BHSF)

  • 27% of employees still believe that a mental health problem would carry a stigma and 36% are scared of what their colleagues might think (BHSF)

  • 21% of employees receive dedicated mental health support from their employer, and an average of 8.4 sick days are taken each year due to a mental health problem (BHSF)

  • 24% of employees worry that if they did need to take a sick day due to a mental health issue, they wouldn’t be taken seriously (BHSF)

  • 62% of participants in wellness programs say their productivity has improved, 56% have had fewer sick days and 30% say they had a disease detected thanks to these programs (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 67% of participants in wellness programs reported reduced bodyweight and 23% quit smoking or other nicotine use (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 23% of employees said they would feel more supported if dedicated days off were allocated for mental wellbeing, and a further 22% would benefit from dedicated mental health support staff (BHSF)

  • 27% of employees would like to have open conversations about mental health within the workplace (BHSF)

  • 43% of employees said annual leave is the work-related benefit that would make them feel most loved at work, followed by public recognition (15%), team drinks (15%), training (10%), professional mentoring (7%), sleeping in once a week (7%), and getting a parking space for a month (2%) (Xexec)

  • 92% of employers say skill shortages is negatively affecting productivity, employee satisfaction and turnover (Hays)

  • Less than 40% of millennials and 30% of Gen Z workers feel they have the skills they’ll need to succeed, and they’re looking to businesses to help ready them to succeed in this new era (Deloitte)

  • 46% of employees do not think their leadership skills are being developed (Execu│Search)

  • 30% of Gen Z said not socializing with team members was one of the most frustrating managerial behaviors – 15% higher than Gen X and 23% higher than the baby boom generation (Sharefile)

  • 68% of men and 66% of women said a manager should always take responsibility for their team’s mistakes (Sharefile)

  • 46% of men and 44% of women said a manager should just be seen as a colleague and not a friend (Sharefile)

  • 53% of men and 50% of women say a manager’s decision on something isn’t final and should be open to challenge (Sharefile)

  • Among managers who oversee one to two employees, 59% report having no training at all, the same measure stands at 41% among managers who overs see three to five workers (West Monroe Partners)

  • 42% of new managers admit they developed their style by observing and mimicking a previous manager rather than through any type formal training (West Monroe Partners)

  • Nearly half of managers who had 10+ years of managerial experience said they’ve only received about nine total hours of training and 43% who have been manager for less than one year have had no training (West Monroe Partners)

  • 36% of managers report spending three to four hours per day on administrative work and 44% frequently feel overwhelmed at work (West Monroe Partners)

  • 44% of managers report feeling overwhelmed at work and are looking for guidance (Gartner)

  • 67% of Gen X leaders said they would like more external coaching and 57% want external development (DDI)

  • 47% of organizations run training and development programs to help build employees’ skills and support career development (Robert Half)

  • 32% of retail employees said they don’t receive any formal training (Axonify)

  • 31% of employees were offered no formal training in 2016 (Axonify)

  • 43% of employees who received training found it to be ineffective (Axonify)

  • 93% of employees want training that is easy to complete/understand, 91% want it to be personalized/relevant, and 90% want it to be engaging/fun (Axonify)

  • 89% of employees want training anytime/anywhere they need to do their job, 85% want to be able to choose the training times that fit their schedule, and 80% believe frequent/regular training is more important than formal workplace training (Axonify)

  • 40% of employees believe their manager is helping them develop the skills they need to perform their work (Gartner)

  • One-third of U.S. workers say they participated in no training to improve their skills in the past year (Gartner)

  • 36% of millennials and 42% of Gen Z reported their employers were helping them understand and prepare for the changes with Industry 4.0 (Deloitte)

  • 43% of employees worry that artificial intelligence and new technology will replace them (Udemy)
  • 34% of employees are concerned that artificial intelligence could someday totally replace them (The Workforce Institute)

  • Two-thirds of employees said they’d feel more at ease with AI if employers were more transparent about the future (The Workforce Institute)

  • 80% of employees see significant opportunity for artificial intelligence to create a more engaging and empowering workplace experience, yet admit a lack of transparency from their employers is a primary driver of fear and concern (The Workforce Institute)

  • 64% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it simplified or automated time consuming internal processes (Coleman)

  • 64% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it helped better balance their workload (Coleman)

  • 62% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it increased fairness in subjective decisions (Coleman)

  • 57% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it ensured managers made better choices affecting individual employees (Coleman)

  • 62% of U.S. employees felt artificial intelligence would simplify time consuming processes, and better balance their workload (64%) (Coleman)

  • 58% of organizations internationally have yet to discuss the potential impact of artificial intelligence on their workforce with employees (Coleman)

  • 61% of global employees say they’d feel more comfortable with artificial intelligence if employers were more transparent about what the future may hold (Coleman)

  • 67% of U.S. employees report they have no knowledge of their organization’s plans for artificial intelligence (Coleman)

  • Organizations in financial services/banking (38%), manufacturing (35%), and logistics/transportation (27%) are already discussing artificial intelligence’s future impact on the workforce with employees (Coleman)

  • 88% of global Gen Z employees believe artificial intelligence can improve their job in some manner, but just 70% of baby boomers feel the same way (Coleman)

  • 48% U.S. Gen Z employees see the biggest benefit of artificial intelligence as its ability to create an overall fairer working environment (Coleman)

  • 38% of U.S. baby boomer employees either don’t think or aren’t sure how artificial intelligence would improve their job (Coleman)

  • While 82% of employees see opportunity for artificial intelligence to improve their jobs, 34% expressed concern that AI could someday replace them altogether, including 42% of Gen Z employees (Coleman)

  • Away from work, 50% of employees say the top stress is the current political climate (Udemy)
  • Workplace stress accounts for as much as $190 billion in healthcare costs (Udemy)
  • 47% of employees want to receive rewards spontaneously (Xexec)

  • 38% of employees want to receive rewards in exchange for good work (Xexec)

  • 52% of employees would rather celebrate rewards with their families than with colleagues (Xexec)

  • When asked to what extent organizations should go to recognize workers’ achievements, 49% said “very” to “extremely” while 38% said “somewhat” and only 12% said “not at all” (IBM)

  • 73% of organizations have an employee recognition awards program in place (Globoforce)
  • 86% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program benefits employee relationships (Globoforce)

  • 85% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program has a positive effect on organizational culture (Globoforce)

  • 84% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program helps employee engagement (Globoforce)

  • 83% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program benefits organizational values (Globoforce)

  • 41% of employees feel personally aligned with their company’s mission and  49% with their values, yet 94% of employees and 98% of employers say those connections are critical (Reward Gateway)

  • 48% of millennials believe businesses behave ethically compared with 65% in 2017 (Deloitte)

  • 45% of millennials believe business has a positive impact on society, down from 72% in 2017 (Deloitte)

  • 47% of millennials believe that business leaders are committed to helping improve society compared with 62% in 2017 (Deloitte)

  • 44% of millennials believe business leaders are making a positive impact and still have some faith in business’ ability to enact meaningful change in society (Deloitte)

  • 75% of millennials believe multinational corporations have the potential to help solve society’s economic, environmental and social challenges (Deloitte)

  • 39% of employees said being a micromanager was the worse trait a boss could have, followed by bosses who are overly critical (22%), disorganized (16%), know-it-all (14%) and impatient (9%) (Comparably)

  • Women said that being overly critical (28%) was nearly as bad as micromanaging (32%) (Comparably)

  • 17% of men rated overly critical as a negative trait in bosses (Comparably)

  • Micromanaging tied with being overly critical (30%) among tech designers as the worst trait for a boss to have (Comparably)

  • 78% of Gen X believes that performance reviews do not provide them with meaningful growth opportunities (Bridge)

  • 94% of executives remain confident in their current review processes, but 61% of employees feel the traditional performance review is outdated (Reflektive)

  • Employees feel the traditional performance review is too generic (22%), too infrequent (6%) and frequently incomplete (62%) (Reflektive)

  • Almost 70% of employers still use the annual or bi-annual performance review system; more than half of the employees surveyed want reviews at least once a month (Reflektive)

  • 94% of employees prefer that managers address performance issues and development opportunities in real-time (Reflektive)

  • 68% of executives said they found out about employees’ issues or concerns for the first time during performance evaluations (Reflektive)

  • 86% of executives said they think their organization would benefit from checking in with employees more often (Reflektive)

  • Nearly 50% of employees said they don’t feel comfortable raising issues with their managers between formal reviews, but that they would be more proactive about doing so (75%) if managers gave them more frequent feedback (Reflektive)

  • 89% of HR Leaders surveyed agree ongoing peer feedback and check-ins have a positive impact on their organizations (Globoforce)

  • 89% of HR executives feel that recognition programs are improving the employee experience (Globoforce)

  • 58% of North American employers are looking to create a brand strategy that enhances employee engagement and improves the employee experience (Blu Ivy)

  • Organizations that score in the top 25% on employee experience report that they see nearly three times the return on assets as those in the bottom quarter (IBM)

  • 71% of employees believe their senior leaders should go to a greater extent to improve the employee experience (IBM)

  • 57% of employees feel confident expressing opinions during meetings, leaving over 40% of workers lacking confidence to speak their mind (Randstad)

  • 78% of workers say a workplace where people are treated equally – regardless of gender, sexual orientation, age, race, or religion – is important to them (Randstad)

  • 56% of female workers and 52% of male workers believe their employers could do more to promote gender equality and diversity (Randstad)

  • 80% of women agree they would switch employers if they felt another company had greater gender equality (Randstad)

  • 31% of women feel they have as many or more opportunities than men at their current companies (Randstad)

  • 34% of women are satisfied with career advancement opportunities at their current employer, compared to 44% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • 30% of women do not feel they have the same career advancement opportunities as men who have the same skills and qualifications at their organization, compared to 12% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • 43% of women are satisfied with training and learning opportunities at their employer vs. 55% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • 58% of women said a lack of promotion to leadership roles was a top reason for gender inequality in the workplace, compared to 34% of men (Randstad)

  • 28% of employees said their employers offer mentorship or leadership programs geared toward women (Randstad)

  • 48% of younger millennials (ages 26 to 30) said they felt they were fairly paid, compared with 50% of older millennials (ages 31-35) and 54% of Gen Z (ages 18-25) (Comparably)

  • When asked what their top priority would be if they became boss, 27% of Gen Z said they would increase employee pay while 35% of Gen Z and 32% of Millennials said they were likely share pay information with coworkers (Comparably)

  • 23% of female workers don’t feel like they are paid fairly compared to their counterparts (Randstad)

  • 40% of employees have discussed salary with a coworker before, and 49% of female workers would leave a job if they learned a male counterpart was making 25% more (Randstad)

  • 53% of employees believe unequal pay is the top factor impacting gender inequality, while 49% attribute outdated biases and stereotypes as the second-leading factor (Randstad)

  • 39% of females say their company treats people fairly, compared to 47% of men (Lean In)

  • 63% of men think their companies are doing a pretty good job supporting diversity, but 23% of women say there is more room for improvement (Lean In)

  • 64% of workers are nearly twice as likely to agree their company is a good place to work when they are satisfied with how life events, such as getting married, buying a house or having a child, are celebrated in the office, compared with 35% who are dissatisfied with how those events are celebrated (Globoforce)

  • 11% of workers said they experienced harassment in the last year, and among those, 75% didn’t report it to their managers (Society for Human Resource Management)

  • 23% of employees admitted to experiencing harassment based on looks, body type or attire, and 22% cited coercion to take on extra hours (Radius)

  • 60% of employees cited co-workers as the most common perpetrators of bad behavior, and just 39% pointed the finger at managers (Radius)

  • 23% of employees said they’d been bullied by an executive, and 20% reported suffering incivility from a subordinate (Radius)

  • 80% of employees would be willing to work longer hours for an empathetic employer (Businessolver)

  • More than two-thirds of employees in tech, healthcare and financial services reported they would be willing to take slightly less pay for a more empathetic employer (Businessolver)

  • 92% of employees said their workplaces are very or somewhat civil (Weber Shandwick & Powell Tate)

  • 48% of employees who reported working in uncivil workplaces said they did not trust leaders to address complaints about incivility (Weber Shandwick & Powell Tate)

  • 77% of nonprofit workers are somewhat or highly satisfied in their current position, even though 52% say they are financially uncomfortable (Work for Good)

  • Roughly 70% of executives indicate that over the last 5 years they’ve seen an increase in the number of Millennials (71%), Gen Xers (69%) and Baby Boomers (46%) who want the opportunity for more social purpose work while on the job (Covestro)

  • 71% of executives say employees’ desire for purpose is prompting HR to rethink certain work policies and 67% say its compelling HR to work more closely with corporate social responsibility to create new policies and programs that give employees the opportunities to get involved in social projects (Covestro)

  • 83% of executives believe skills-based volunteerism (small teams of employees engaging in short-term consulting projects that aid nonprofit organizations and their causes) could help employees satisfy their desire for purpose and hone their teamwork and/or leadership abilities, develop new skills and/or strengthen existing ones (77%), and become more engaged and productive in their own work (67%) (Covestro)

  • 90% of employees in pet friendly workplaces and less than 65% of employees in non-friendly workplaces feel highly connected to their company’s mission, fully engaged with their work and willing to recommend their employer to others (Nationwide)

  • More than three times as many employees at pet friendly workplaces report a positive working relationship with their boss and co-workers (Nationwide)

  • 83% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel their work is rewarding and exciting vs. 46% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 88% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces would recommend their place of employment to others vs. 51% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel the company supports their physical health and wellness and 89% feel the company supports their mental well-being vs. 59% and 53% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 52% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces report a positive working relationship with their supervisor and 53% with their co-workers vs. 14% and 19% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 85% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces rarely miss a day of work for well-being and/or recuperation vs. 77% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 70% of employers are impacted by prescription drug misuse (NSC)

  • 48% of employers identified a negative business impact from prescription drug misuse (NSC)

  • 10% of companies reported an employee prescription drug overdose (NSC)

  • 20% of companies reported knowledge of employees selling or borrowing prescription medications or having drug-related arrests (NSC)

  • Professionals said they spend an average of 25.5 minutes per day on sports-related activities in the office during the college basketball playoffs. With the tournament spread across 15 workdays, that’s 6 hours per employee (OfficeTeam)

  • 46% of employees love being able to keep up with sports and bond with coworkers at work (OfficeTeam)

  • 33% of employees are not particularly into sports, but are ok playing along with activities during work (OfficeTeam)

  • 21% of employees would rather just focus on work and not celebrate sports during work (OfficeTeam)

  • 62% of managers say employees take time to check game scores and team rankings at work during major sporting events (OfficeTeam)

  • 59% of managers say employees increase their frequency of sports talk at work around major sporting events (OfficeTeam)

Topics: Employee Engagement + Loyalty, Benefits Trends

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