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For years companies have invested in customer loyalty through programs, incentives, customer service operations and more. Meanwhile, not nearly as much attention has been placed on a segment that has proven, direct correlations to customer retention: employee engagement and loyalty.

As we've done with customer loyalty, coupons, millennial loyalty and others, we felt it Access-Perks-employee-discount-program.pngwould be useful to compile relevant statistics on employee engagement and loyalty.

By relevant, we mean US-based research and surveys released in the past few years (if it's older than 2010 we've provided a notation). Each employee engagement statistic has a link back to the original source when possible, or a reputable media citation otherwise.

Looking through these you'll see some trends emerge, or in some cases, conflicting data. We'll leave those for you to interpret which is most accurate. We've broken them up into categories:

We'll keep the page updated regularly with new research. If there's a statistic you're looking for but can't find, leave us a note in the comments and we'll see what we can do to help.

Looking for stats from specific years? We got em for 2016 and 2017.

This data is compiled on behalf of Access Perks, provider of America's best employee discount programs. Visit our site to learn more! New Call-to-action

Employee Retention & Engagement Statistics

  • 34.1% of American workers are engaged (Gallup
  • 51% of the U.S. workforce is not engaged (Gallup)
  • 15% of adult employees are engaged with their employers, although organizations globally invest $18 billion per year on tools to boost engagement (ITA Group)

  • About 70% of Americans are disengaged at work (Gallup)

  • Of the 5 billion people on the planet, only 1.4 billion have a good job, and just 16% of those are engaged (Gallup)

  • 63% of the workforce was engaged in 2016 (24% highly engaged, 39% were moderately engaged) (Aon Hewitt)
  • 65% of employees plan to stay in their current jobs despite disengagement at work (Achievers)

  • 20.8% of employees consider themselves very engaged, 16.3% are fully engaged and 31.3% are engaged but feel their company could do more to improve employee experience (Achievers)

  • 34.7% of workers plan to look for a new job in 2019, down from 74% last year (Achievers)

  • 70.1% of employees do not consider themselves very engaged (Achievers)

  • 18.6% of employees haven’t even decided if they’ll look for a new job yet (Achievers)

  • 31.6% of employees said they have average engagement in their current job (Achievers)

  • 14% of employees said the main reason they would change jobs is because they aren’t engaged (Achievers)

  • 54.2% of employees would leave their job for a pay raise, career advancement (37.8%) and for better corporate benefits (20.7%) (Achievers)

  • Nearly half of workers have left a job because it didn’t align with their expectations (ThriveMap)

     

  • 48% of workers left their job because it wasn’t what they thought it would be (ThriveMap)

     

  • 73% of Gen Z workers left their job for not meeting their expectations (ThriveMap)

  • 26% of employees ranked recognition for their work in their top three factors for staying with their current employer, but 17% said their manager/employer was horrible – they never recognized their work and 43% ranked their manager/employer as just okay – recognizing them annually or quarterly at least (Achievers)

  • Businesses with a strong learning culture enjoy employee engagement and retention rates around 30-50% higher than those that don’t (Robert Half)

  • 42% of L&D professionals who indicated their employees were highly engaged in learning were also highly engaged overall at the organization (Findcourses.com)

  • 36% of workers and nearly half of millennials would consider quitting a job that didn’t provide learning opportunities (Docebo)

  • 16.5% of employees are "actively disengaged" (Gallup
  • 29% of millennials are engaged at work, 16% are actively disengaged, 55% are not engaged (Gallup)
  • Employee engagement levels bounced back to an all-time high rate of 65% in 2017, up 2% from 2016 (Aon)

  • 47% of businesses believe that recent pension freedoms have led to employees being more engaged (CBI)

  • 81% of employees say that retirement benefits make up a major portion of a job search (TCRS)

  • 93% of nonprofit employees are engaged at work, a rate triple the national average (Work for Good)

  • 22% of employees said they plan to change jobs in the 2nd half of 2018 (CareerBuilder)

  • 52% of U.S. workers plan to look for a new job in 2019, and of those who will take part in the hunt, 54% landed their current job less than a year ago (Adtaxi)

  •  45% of employees reported having either changed jobs in the past 12 months or planned to do so in the next year; in 2017, 18% said they planned to switch jobs but 27% actually did (Randstad)

  • 80% of workers would keep a job with benefits rather than take one that offered more pay and no benefits (AICPA)

  • 55% of employees would be somewhat likely to accept a job with lower compensation but a more robust benefits package (Aflac)

  • 80% of employees who said they have a good variety of benefits to choose from also said they identified strongly with their organization’s vision and values, as opposed to 40% of those who don’t (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • Reasons employees value their work and are loyal to their employer include the work they perform (55%), salary (50%) and immediate supervisor (39%) (Addison Group)

  • 81% of employees who can easily access their benefits said they feel loyal to their employer and 79% say they were proud to work for their organization (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 82% of employees have a high sense of loyalty to their employer (West Monroe)

  • 77% of employees who understand their benefits offering said they saw themselves staying at their organization for the foreseeable future (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • Retention (72%) and recruiting (58%) were the top reasons for increasing benefits (SHRM)

  • 64% of millennials say benefits are extremely or very important to employer loyalty (Qualtrics)

  • More than 60% of women say better health, dental and vision benefits would be taken into heavy consideration by women applicants compared to only 47% of men (Harvard Business Review)

  • 50% of adults would leave their current job for better benefits (Yoh)

  • 78% of workers would likely remain with their employer because of the benefits it offers, up from 72% in 2016 (WTW)

  • More than 70% of employees agreed that fringe benefits would be a key consideration in evaluating future jobs (Zenefits)

  • 40% of employees agreed they would leave their current job within a year for another offering more fringe benefits, but 25% wouldn’t leave (Zenefits)

  • More than 60% of employees would take a job with a lower salary for better benefits (Zenefits)

  • 59% of employees would be willing to leave their current job if a more appealing offer came their way, even though they aren’t actively looking for another job (West Monroe)

  • 67% of workers consider leaving their job if work arrangements became more rigid (Staples)

  • Nearly a third of millennials say they’ll be chasing higher salaries at another employer five years from now (Staples)

  • 68% of employees would consider leaving their job if they didn’t feel supported by more senior employees (Staples)

  • 63% of employees wouldn’t accept a job without first knowing that the organization is actively inclusive of women, minorities and people with disabilities (Staples)

  • 25% of employees would require at least a 20% increase in salary to justify making a move (West Monroe)

  • 72% of workers are satisfied, but 60% are still looking around for a new job with higher wages (Addison Group)

  • 51% of employees admitted increased expenses around the holiday inspire them to look for jobs with greater financial opportunity (Allegis)

  • 62% of employees said they planned to increase their job search efforts in 2019 (Allegis)

  • Almost three-quarters of workers are confident they would be able to quickly acquire a new job (Addison Group)

  • 40% of workers say their current company is aware they’re actively looking for a new job (Addison Group)

  • 12% of employees admitted they were disloyal to their employer and 21% considered themselves dissatisfied (West Monroe)

  • 60% of employees said they’ve received inbound interest from recruiters or other firms within the last six months, with 43% pursuing at least one of those (West Monroe)

  • More than 50% of employees said they have left jobs after hearing the siren calls of better benefits elsewhere (Randstad)

  • 42% of adults said they’d jump ship for a flexible work option (Yoh)

  • 61% of workers left or considered quitting a job because it lacked work flexibility options (FlexJobs)

  • More than 75% of workers would be more loyal to their organization if it offered flexible work options (FlexJobs)

  • 70% of millennials have considered leaving a job for another boasting flexible work options, but just 50% of older workers have felt the same pull (FlexJobs)

  • Almost 80% of millennials said they would be more loyal to an employer offering flexible work options, while just over 70% of older workers said they same (FlexJobs)

  • More than 80% of millennials say they seriously consider how a position will affect their work-life balance, but only 62% of older workers agreed (Flexjobs)

  • Less than 10% of older and younger workers would say they produce their best work in the office; more than 60% said they’d be more productive if they telecommuted and 41% said they don’t think they should have to exchange salary or vacation time for telecommuting options (Flexjobs)

  • Roughly one-third of adults would leave their job for a higher-level position, a better company culture or a shorter commute (Yoh)

  • 15% of adults said they wouldn’t leave their current job for any reason (Yoh)

  • 18% of North American employees said they planned to switch jobs in 2017 but 26% actually did (Randstad)

  • 85% of employees who switched from for-profit organizations to nonprofits said they planned to remain in the nonprofit sector for the rest of their careers (Work for Good)

  • 82% of employees are continuously looking for opportunities elsewhere and 40% expect to have four to six jobs in their work life (Jobvite)

  • A third of job seekers left a job within 90 days; 43% of that group said their day-to-day role wasn’t what they thought it would be; 34% said they were driven away by a bad experience or incident; 32% cited company culture; and 11% said they signed onto a new job but later changed their minds (Jobvite)

  • 14% or roughly 4.5 million workers are likely to move on to a new job (Robert Half)

  • 33% of professionals selected “I’m bored, need new challenge” as their motivation for moving on to another job (Korn Ferry)

  • 44% of workers said they would leave their current job for one that pays more (OfficeTeam)

  • Money is the number one motivator for 67% of job seekers and employees looking elsewhere for career opportunities (Glassdoor)

  • 74% of millennials believe job hunting could help their careers (Robert Half)

  • 19% of professionals cited more money as their reason for job hunting (Korn Ferry)

  • 51% of workers are looking to leave their current jobs (Gallup)
  • 16% of employees are actively seeking a new job (IBM)

  • More than 80% of workers are either actively looking for a new job or are open to one (Ajilon)

  • 15% of workers believe you should always be exploring other opportunities (Ajilon)

  • 46% of 18-to-25-year-olds is the age group most likely to leave their job (Ajilon)

  • 64% of workers feel uncomfortable negotiating higher pay with the hiring boss at a new job (Ajilon)

  • 66% of professional employees plan not to stay at their current company long term (ExecuSearch)

  • More than 80% of employees would quit their jobs for better development opportunities (ExecuSearch)

  • Employees said managerial support was the most important aspect of company culture and 71% would quit if another employer offered them flexible scheduling in a new job (ExecuSearch)

  • Nearly half of employees said they’ve quit a job because of a bad manager, 56% think managers are promoted prematurely and 60% think managers need managerial training (Udemy)

  • Females are more likely to leave for having a bad manager compared to males (34% vs. 25%) (Ajilon)

  • More than half of lower-level workers said managerial disrespect is a top concern that can make them think about quitting, even if they like their jobs (Yoh)

  • Managers who break promises (46%), over-work employees (42%) and have unrealistic expectations of workers (42%) are some of the top reasons that drive workers to quit (Yoh)

  • Women (59%) are more likely than men (48%) to say that disrespect will make them leave their jobs (Yoh)

  • Managers who have limited knowledge (30%), offer inadequate performance feedback (24%), can’t effectively help workers develop their skills (23%) and are uninvolved in daily interactions (18%) can cause workers to consider leaving (Yoh)

  • Men are more likely to leave for being underpaid compared to women (39% vs. 33%) (Ajilon)

  • One-third of job seekers would pass up the perfect job if the corporate culture was a bad fit (Robert Half)

  • 91% of U.S. managers and 90% of Canadian managers said culture fit is more important than experience or skills (Robert Half)

  • 13.5% of workers admit that company culture will push them to accept another job offer (Ajilon)

  • 46% of employees would accept another job if the opportunity arose (IBM)

  • HR professionals and others involved in people management were 37% more likely to find work elsewhere and leave their current position than those in other job categories (Culture Amp)

  • The best single indicator of employee churn was workers’ responses to the statement: “I see myself still working at my company in two years time.” Respondents who strongly disagreed with this statement were 136% more likely to churn than the average worker; those who disagreed were 100% more likely to churn; and those who gave a neutral response were 36% more likely to leave for another position (Culture Amp)

  • Employees with 3-6 months on staff were 19% more likely to churn than those with less than 3 months tenure (12%), and workers ages 18-24 were 40% more likely to leave for another job (Culture Amp)

  • About 40% of workers said they left a company because they lacked access to state-of-the-art digital tools and 58% said they need to work elsewhere to gain digital skills (Randstad)

  • Workers at technology laggards were 450% more likely to want to leave to go work elsewhere (Unisys)

  • 58% of business leaders said their technology offerings are a factor in candidates’ decisions to work for them and 51% said outdated technology hampers their ability to compete for talent (Harvard Business Review)

  • 45% of employers complain that outdated versions keep them from being productive (Unisys)

  •  47% of higher educated workers said a limited career path could get them to leave for a better opportunity (Randstad)

  • 68% of employees did not choose salary as the most important factor to inform their decisions to take or reject job opportunities (Lexington Law)

  • Almost 40% of employees chose interests and passion as the most important factor that informs their decisions to take or reject job opportunities (Lexington Law)

  • 10% of employees said benefits are the most important factor that informs their decisions to take or reject job opportunities (Lexington Law)

  • 45% of employees said they consider a prospective company’s work-life balance a crucial factor when researching a job (Lexington Law)

  • 50% of employees said they have left a position to escape a bad manager (Lexington Law)

  • Factors influencing workers to join a company are its use of the most up to date tools (80%), innovative culture (72%) and reputation as a leader in digitization (62%) (Randstad)

  • 48% of millennials said they will look for a new job in the next three months, and 56% begin their search in the next year (Spherion)

  • 19% of millennials and 8% of boomers are looking to exit their company (IBM)

  • 59% of employees say 1-2 years is the right length of time to stay in a job before looking for another (Ajilon)

  • 25% of employees are actively looking for new job opportunities and 55% are passively open to new opportunities (Ajilon)

  • 43% of employees said they would leave their current jobs for another that paid better (Ajilon)

  • Employees who give their managers a low rating are four times more likely to be interviewing for other jobs than their peers (TINYpulse)

  • Of employees who rate their boss unfavorable, 40% interviewed for a new job in the past three months vs. 10% who rated their manager highly (TINYpulse)

  • 21.5% of workers who don’t feel recognized for doing great work have interviewed for a job in the past three months vs. 12.4% who do feel recognized (TINYpulse)

  • 54% of employees said their main reason for staying on the job is their loyalty to their coworkers, team, boss or company (Ajilon)

  • 38% of younger employees ages 18-25 and 34% of employees ages 51-55 were most likely to quit their job because of a co-worker (Comparably)
  • A third of employees said their reason for leaving their job was a bad boss or manager (Ajilon)

  • 58% of workers say they’d start a job with a lower salary if that meant working for a great boss (Randstad)

  • 60% of employees say they have left jobs, or would consider leaving because they don’t like their supervisors, and 58% say they would leave their job because of negative office politics (Randstad)

  • 51% of employees would quit their job if training was not offered (Udemy)

  • Offering career training and development would keep 86% of millennials from leaving their current position (Bridge)

  • 56% of millennials believe that an individual should stay at a single company for more than 20 years (Bridge)

  • If a job lacks growth opportunities and avenues for leadership development, 67% of millennials would leave that position (Bridge)

  • 43% of millennials envision leaving their jobs within 2 years, and 28% are looking to stay beyond 5 years (Deloitte)

  • 62% of millennials who would willingly leave their employers within the next 2 years regard the gig economy as a viable alternative to full-time employment (Deloitte)

  • 59% of employees say they’ve been with their current employer for more than 3 years and among older millennials (ages 30-37), 22% have been with their current employer for more than 7 years (Udemy)

  • 90% of Millennials want to grow their careers with their current companies (Bridge)

  • 59% of Gen Z and 7% of baby boomers would have to remain with an employer for between 1-4 years to consider it to be long-term employment (Sharefile)

  • 38% of baby boomers would have to remain with an employer for 11+ years to consider it to be long-term employment (Sharefile)

  • 34% of Gen Z and 12% of baby boomers said the best way to get to where I want to be is by moving from company to company (Sharefile)

  • 61% of Gen Z employees say they would leave their current jobs within 2 years if given the choice (Deloitte)

  • 59% of Gen Z would expect to stay with their current employer for less than 2 years (Deloitte)

  • Millennials and Gen Z working for employers perceived to have diverse workforces and senior management teams are more likely to want to stay 5 or more years (Deloitte)

  • Among Millennial and Gen Z employees who said they intend to stay with their current employers for at least 5 years, 55% note greater flexibility in where and when they work now compared to 3 years ago (Deloitte)

  • Less than 40% of millennials and 30% of Gen Z workers feel they have the skills they’ll need to succeed, and they’re looking to businesses to help ready them to succeed in this new era (Deloitte)

  • 55% of workers who feel their employer cares about their well-being want to stay at their company for 10 years or more vs. 33% who don’t believe their company cares (Guardian)

  • Nearly 20% of 24-35 year olds said reputation for ethical behavior, diversity and inclusion as well as workplace wellbeing were important when choosing an employer (Deloitte)

  • 40% of employees are considering employment outside of their current firm within the next year (SHRM)
  • 34% of employees say they plan to leave their current role in the next 12 months (Mercer)
  • More than a third of workers are searching actively or casually for a job (Ceridian)

  • 36% of workers would consider a position if it presented itself, and only 27% said they are not interested in a job outside their current company (Ceridian)

  • 32% of employees said they need to leave their job to move forward in their career (Ceridian)

  • 86% of employees said it is important for employers to provide learning opportunities (Ceridian)

  • More than 35% of 18-34 year olds ranked compensation as the top motivating factor to leave their job (Ceridian)

  • 81% of employees would consider leaving their current role for the right offer (Hays)

  • 75% of employees are happy at work, but nearly 8 in 10 said they’re likely to leave in search of another position after just one bad day on the job (Addison Group)

  • 81% of job seekers cited dissatisfaction with the work environment as the major reason they started look elsewhere for work (Addison Group)

  • 75% of job seekers said being passed over for a promotion was a reason to go job hunting (Addison Group)

  • 44% of employees are happy in their current role (Hays)

  • 74% of all workers are satisfied with their jobs; 66% of those are still open to new employment (Jobvite
  • 37% of employees indicated they were “very satisfied” and 51% “somewhat satisfied” with their jobs (SHRM)
  • 86% of employees say they're at least somewhat happy with their jobs, 43% are very happy, just 4% very unhappy (Staples)
  • 38% of unhappy workers admitted to listening in on a private conversation, 5% to drinking alcohol, 15% to taking naps, 9% to helping themselves to coworkers’ food in the fridge, 40% playing pranks on coworkers, 5% to watching Netflix and 2% to using the company credit card for personal purchases (Randstad)

  • 67% of employees are extremely or very satisfied with their jobs (Aflac
  • 67% of gig-only millennials reported that they like their current work situation and wouldn’t want to change it, and 75% of workers over the age of 56 reported the same (Prudential)

  • 45% of Gen X gig-only workers reported satisfaction with their work (Prudential)

  • The cost to employers was $14,900 for every hiring error last year (CareerBuilder)

  • Losing a good hire costs on average $30,000 (CareerBuilder)

  • Two-thirds of workers say they accepted a job offer only to realize later that the company was a bad fit (CareerBuilder)

  • Turnover costs range from an estimated 90% to 200% of a departing employee’s salary (Mercer)

  • Millennial turnover costs the U.S. economy $30.5 billion annually (Gallup)
  • It can cost 33% of an employee’s salary to replace him/her (HR Dive)
  • 63% of employers say they feel they have to pay workers more because the market is getting more competitive for talent (CareerBuilder)

  • Turnover rates in business leadership positions are far higher for women (31%) than for men (24.1%) (The Network of Executive Women)

  • 75% of the causes of employee turnover are preventable (HR Dive)
  • 60-70% of employee turnover is voluntary (ADP)

  • 30% of workers strongly agree that at work, their opinions seem to count- by moving this to 60% of employees, organizations could realize a 27% reduction in turnover, a 40% reduction in safety incidents and a 12% increase in productivity (Gallup)

  • 90% of employees are open to new career opportunities (LinkedIn)
  • 73% of employees are open to hearing about new opportunities (TopResume)
  • Nearly 60% of Americans would take a job they love over a job they hate, even if the preferred position paid half the amount of salary they would earn at the job they dislike (Lexington Law)

  • 13% of employees say they love their job and are not looking for other opportunities (TopResume)
  • 11% of employees say they don’t love their job, but they’re not sure if it’s time to leave it (TopResume)
  • 59% of employees would leave their profession if they could (CareerCast)
  • The number of freelance workers is growing three times faster than the rest of the workforce, adding $1.4 trillion annually to the economy (Upwork)

  • 57.3 million Americans are freelancers, representing 36% of the U.S. workforce (Upwork)

  • 47% of millennials are already freelancing (Upwork)

  • Nearly 1.4 million U.S. workers could lose their jobs over the next decade due to technological change (WEF)

  • The cost of retraining workers from current roles to new, viable, desirable and growing roles would be $34 billion in total or $24,800 per worker on average (WEF)

  • Private-sector employers could profitably reskill 25% of at-risk workers, 45% by collaborating with stakeholders and the government could assist as many as 77% of all at-risk workers (WEF)

  • About 2% of long-term workers left their jobs the year automation spiked at their company, rising to 8.5% after about 5 years (Boston University School of Law)

  • 87% of employers said they planned to maintain or increase their head counts because of automation (Manpower Group)

  • Nearly 50% of companies expect automation to lead to a reduction in their full-time workforce by 2020 (WEF)

  • 55% of freelancers are preparing for the future and automation’s possible takeover of their work by reskilling, compared to 30% of other categories of workers (Upwork)

  • 63% of people are choosing to be freelancers, up from 53% since 2014 (Upwork)

  • Freelancers may outnumber other workers by 2027 or possibly sooner (Upwork)

  • 26% of people said they would leave a traditional job to do freelance work (ReportLinker)

  • 29% of people cited the freedom that comes from being your own boss as a reason they would leave a traditional job to do freelance work (ReportLinker)

  • More than 20% of workers said they’ve left a job because they were denied the chance to transfer to a new location at the company (Topia)

  • More than 50% of workers who considered leaving said they would reconsider quitting for a chance to relocate, even if they weren’t given more pay or additional benefits (Topia)

  • Millennials are 50% more likely to relocate and 16% more likely to switch industries for a new job than nonmillennials (LinkedIn)
  • 3% of employees say they’re unsure of their feelings toward their current job (TopResume)
  • 18% of employees don’t feel confident that an employer will take care of them (Job Applicator Center)
  • 52% of employees feel confident their employer will repay them for their loyalty  (Job Applicator Center)
  • 45% of hiring decision makers note that salary is the top reason for employees changing jobs (Glassdoor)

  • 48% of hiring decision makers note salary and compensation is the most influential factor for a candidate decision on where to work (Glassdoor)

  • Employees earn a 5.2% pay increase on average when changing jobs (Glassdoor)
  • A 10% increase in base pay increases the odds an employee will stay at the company by 1.5 percent (Glassdoor)
  • A company’s equitable resolution of issues will affect voluntary turnover 2.5 times more than it impacts engagement (Globalization Partners)

  • 69% of hiring managers say voluntary turnover has not increased at their companies in 2016 (DHI Group)
  • 37% of employers say turnover has picked up over the past 12 months; 16% say it’s dropped off (WTW)
  • 78% of businesses are more worried about a talent shortage than they were last year (Spherion)
  • 34% of employers said that talent scarcity is their greatest concern (Randstad)

  • More than 60% of employers said it’s difficult to find skilled workers, a little less than half said the same about meeting compensation requirements, and about the same amount have struggled to identify diverse candidates (LaSalle)

  • 49% of employers said it was a challenge to find candidates with hard skills, and 51% experience difficulty in looking for employees with soft skills (LaSalle)

  • 62% can't afford to meet new salary increase demands even though they think it's right to do so (Spherion)
  • 41% of millennials expect to be in their current job for two years or less (compared to 17% of Gen X and 10% of Boomers) (Job Applicator Center)
  • 44% of Millennials say, if given the choice, they expect to leave their current employers in the next two years (Deloitte
  • 50% of Millennials (compared with 60% of non-millennials) strongly agree that they plan to be working at their company one year from now (Gallup)
  • 42% of millennials expect to change jobs at least every 1-3 years (Jobvite
  • 58% of millennials reported that they intended to stay in their current role for fewer than three years (Red Brick)

  • 52% of millennials viewed the concept of employee loyalty as being overrated (Red Brick)

  • 44% of millennial leaders say they intend to stay at their same company for more than 15 years; 29% of non-millennial leaders said the same thing (The Conference Board)
  • 29% of professionals plan to look for a new position in the next 12 months (Accountemps)

  • 26% of employees are liable to look for a new job during the next 12 months (up from 18% in 2015) (Spherion)
  • 82% of millennials who work at independent insurance agencies are encouraging their friends and family to also get into the line of work (Vertafore)

  • 67% of millennials who work at independent insurance agencies have been in the industry for three years or longer and plan to stay in the industry for as long as possible (Vertafore)

  • 71% of full-time state and local government workers are unhappy or disengaged with their jobs (Gallup)
  • 65% of people think that freelancers are happier than other professionals (ReportLinker)

  • 42% of public school superintendents in the U.S. are engaged with their jobs (Gallup)

  • Millennial managers are nearly two-thirds less likely to resign (11.9%) than non-manager millennials (36.2%) (Visier)

  • Millennial managers who haven’t been promoted resign at a rate of 5.2% higher than the average, while millennial managers who were promoted in the last two years resign at a rate of 3.1% below average (Visier)

  • Men who haven’t been promoted resign at a rate of 1.7% higher than the average, while women resign at a rate of only .7% (Visier)

  • The average employee tenure is eight years, the annual turnover rate is 19% and the involuntary turnover rate is 8% (SHRM)
  • Employers say there’s a 40% turnover rate among workers (CareerBuilder)
  • 45% of employees reported that they would be likely or very likely to look for other jobs outside their current organization within the next year (SHRM)
  • 53% of employees said they don’t expect to stay at their companies beyond five years (Nintex)

  • 28% of workers ages 18-35 say they can see themselves staying on for at least another two years (Comparably)

  • 50% of employees say that are planning to stay at their current company for two years or less (Execu-Search)
  • 27% of employees change jobs each year, 17% are actively job-hunting and 46% are passively looking (ADP)
  • 71% of workers said they are looking to change employers (Mental Health America)

  • 84% of passive job seekers would think about leaving their current employer if another with an outstanding rating made a job offer (Energage)

  • Of the 27 markets surveyed, Los Angeles, CA (40%); Austin, TX (38%); and Dallas, TX (37%) topped the list of U.S. cities with the most workers planning to find new opportunities (Accountemps)

  • 59% of US workers are likely to leave their jobs for new opportunities (Adobe)
  • 50% of employees who say they love their current jobs would still leave for a new opportunity if given the chance (Adobe)
  • For every additional 10 months an employee stagnates in a job role, they are 1% more likely to leave the company (Glassdoor)
  • 47% of Americans would leave for their ideal job even if it meant less pay (Adobe)
  • 71% of employees would take a pay cut for their ideal job (Hays)

  • 21% of employees would take a 10% pay cut to work in a nicer workplace (Staples)

  • 32% of employees would take a 10% pay cut for a job they’re more interested in or passionate about (Jobvite)

  • 50% of referred employees stayed in their positions five years on average (SilkRoad)
  • 86% of workers report they would expect to be happier at a job they were referred for (iCIMS)

  • 35% of Gen X employees are actively job hunting (Nintex)

  • 50% of Millennial employees rarely think about leaving their organization to work somewhere else, compared to 54% of Gen Xers and 63% of Baby Boomers (Modern Survey)
  • 41% of Gen X are happy in their role, 51% experience high or very high workplace pressure, and one-third say they are highly likely to consider leaving their current role (Hays)

  • Baby Boomers are most likely to be satisfied in their current role (48%) and least likely to consider leaving (77%) (Hays)

  • 47% of workers report that they have had to replace more than 20% of their workforce during the past 12 months (Spherion)
  • State with the highest employee engagement: Alabama (37% of workforce); West Virginia is the lowest (21% of workforce actively disengaged) (Gallup)
  • 69% of employees who strongly agreed they feel enthusiastic about the future were engaged in their jobs, compared with 1% of employees who disagree (Gallup)

  • 15% of employees worldwide are engaged in their jobs (Gallup)

  • The attrition rate of disengaged employees is 12x higher than highly engaged employees over the period of a year (Glint)
  • Attrition rates globally across other sectors are 8% to 10% annually (The Network of Executive Women)

  • More than 90% of workers said they are motivated and driven workers (RingCentral Glip)

  • 50% of workers marked themselves as very motivated and another 88% said they are committed to doing their best work (RingCentral Glip)

  • 22% of C-suite workers, 34% of directors and managers and 28% of the most motivated employees said they check out for an hour every day (RingCentral Glip)

  • Millennials and Gen Z are twice as likely as Baby Boomers and Gen X to disengage at work (RingCentral Glip)

  • Almost two-thirds of workers ages 18-34 said they’re motivated by video meetings and team messaging (RingCentral Glip)

  • More than 70% of HR professionals believe outmoded work practices, sketchy career paths and limits on advancement, development and mentoring are impacting attrition and 69% identified flexible work schedules, wellness programs, fast-track promotions and other perks as problematic (Allegis Group)

  • 88% of business plan to improve employee engagement in 2017 (Virgin Pulse)
  • 16% of employees said they felt “connected and engaged” by employers (EmployeeChannel)
  • Organizations that score in the top 25% on employee experience report that they see nearly three times the return on assets as those in the bottom quarter (IBM)

  • 58% of North American employers are looking to create a brand strategy that enhances employee engagement and improves the employee experience (Blu Ivy)

  • 35% of female employees are engaged compared to 29% of men (Gallup)
  • 41% of women managers are engaged compared to 35% of male managers (Gallup)
  • 63% of young females agree that employees should stay in their first job between 2-3 years, compared to 54% of males (Adecco)
  • 65% of workers think they’d be more productive working at home than in the office (FlexJobs)

  • 75% of workers said they experience greater productivity at home because they encounter fewer distractions, fewer interruptions from colleagues (74%), less stress from commuting (71%) and less office politics (65%) (FlexJobs)

  • 30% of employees who work from home are engaged (Gallup)
  • 75% of workers say they’re loyal to their employers, but only 54% feel their company is loyal to them (CareerBuilder)

  • 87% of employees say they’re “highly committed” to their organization  (ReportLinker)
  • 40% of millennials say they are “somewhat” committed to their employer (ReportLinker)
  • 66% of older employees say they are “highly” committed  (ReportLinker)
  • 35% of employees have changed jobs within the past three years; 91% of these left their company to do so (Gallup)
  • 54% of Americans say now is a "good time" to find a quality job (Gallup)
  • 37% of engaged employees are looking for jobs or watching for opportunities, as are 56% of not engaged and 73% of actively disengaged employees (Gallup)
  • 51% of U.S. workers overall (60% of millennials) are considering new employment opportunities (Gallup)
  • The average American worker spends 15 months in one role (Glassdoor)
  • 21% of millennials say they've changed jobs within the past year, more than 3x the number of non-millennials (Gallup)
  • 93% of millennials left their company the last time they changed roles (Gallup)
  • 20% of employers have replaced nearly half of their staff in the last 12 months (Spherion)
  • 78% of HR leaders are more concerned about the talent shortage today than they were a year ago (Spherion)
  • 93% of employers are actively taking steps to address the talent shortage (SunTrust)

  • 92% of employers say skill shortages is negatively affecting productivity, employee satisfaction and turnover (Hays)

  • 68% of the human resource professionals say last year they experienced recruiting difficulty and skill shortages for certain types of jobs (SHRM)
  • 83% of HR professionals struggled with recruiting suitable candidates in the past 12 months (SHRM)

  • 52% of HR professionals said the skills gap has worsened in the past two years, and 83% said the quality of job applicants decreased (SHRM)

  • More than 25% of HR professionals said their organizations partner with schools to create a pipeline of candidates, but nearly half said the education system has done little to remedy the problem (SHRM)

  • 83% of employers believe attracting and retaining talent is a growing challenge (Allegis Group)
  • The number of employers concerned about retention rose by 7% since 2018 (PayScale)

  • 47% of HR leaders cited employee turnover and retention as their top challenge (Globoforce)

  • Companies’ top 3 challenges are training (44%), planning and budgeting (38%) and technology (37%) (Catalant)

  • To overcome technology gaps, employers said they plan to adopt change management strategies and new technologies to attract specialized or highly skilled talent (75%), find talent that can do the work faster (62%), speed up talent acquisition (57%) and reduce reliance on costly brand-name consulting firms (40%) (Catalant)

  • 67% of decision-makers say they’re more concerned about turnover at their organizations now than they were 12 months ago (Randstad)
  • 17% of companies investing in data-based HR technology are looking to reduce turnover (OutMatch)

  • 60% of companies investing in data-based HR technology said they had average turnover rates of up to 20%, and 25% of the organizations had turnover rates of up to 50% (OutMatch)

  • 71% of Millennials say an organization’s view of technology will influence whether they want to work there and 66% of Gen Xers and 53% of baby boomers feel similarly (CompTIA)

  • About two-thirds of baby boomers think younger workers aren’t as loyal and nearly 60% think younger workers feel entitled (CompTIA)

  • 12% of businesses are happy with current levels of employee engagement (CBI)

  • 31% of employers are very satisfied with their recruitment process (Allegis)

  • 69% of high performing talent organizations are more likely to feature clearly defined must-have and nice-to-have skills in their job descriptions (Allegis)

  • 55% of businesses think that stronger engagement would improve their ability to either retain, recruit or carry out succession planning (CBI)

  • 44% of businesses think improved employee engagement would lead to them better being able to retain, whilst 36% think it would have a positive impact on recruitment (CBI)

  • 53% of HR pros say that the highest priority in the coming year is to retain top talent (Xerox)
  • 42% of businesses report that their ability to recruit has been improved by their pension scheme (CBI)

  • 45% of micro companies and 53% of small companies utilize social networking to recruit, compared to 73% of large businesses (HireRight)

  • 25% of micro businesses and 50% of small businesses rely on their corporate website to recruit and attract candidates compared to 80% of their large counterparts (HireRight)

  • 15% of micro companies are utilizing a mobile-friendly application and screening process (HireRight)

  • 42% of businesses report that pension provision has a positive impact on employee retention (CBI)

  • 82% of employers would hire someone who had switched jobs in the past six months, 51% believe that job switchers are more motivated thanks to their desire for a fulfilling position, and 42% would be more likely to hire someone who made a career change rather than someone who hadn’t (Edology)

  • 37% of hiring decision makers say retention rates would increase significantly if new hires were better informed during the hiring process (Glassdoor)

  • 87% of human resource leaders say improved retention is a high / critical priority (Kronos)
  • 24% of CHROs say engaging and retaining employees is their biggest struggle (Korn Ferry)
  • 73% of U.S. workers said health and wellness programs are a consideration in deciding whether to work for a company (OfficeTeam)

  • 87% of U.S. workers ages 18-34, 70% ages 35-54, and 44% ages 55+ factor in health and wellness offerings in their job decisions (OfficeTeam)

  • 79% of men and 65% of women consider health and wellness in their employment decisions (OfficeTeam)

  • 60% of companies offer wellness programs to stay competitive when attracting and retaining employees vs. 14% of those companies with no identified culture of health (Optum)

  • 42% of employers said their wellness programs aim to improve employee engagement (Virgin Pulse)

  • 46% of HR pros say retention is their greatest concern, followed by employee engagement at 36% (SHRM)
  • 46% of HR pros list retention as their top challenge (Globoforce)
  • 24% of US businesses employing hourly workers say employee retention is their top problem (Deputy)
  • 36% of businesses see engagement as a top challenge (Globoforce)
  • Distraction at work is a problem for 69% of full-time employees (Udemy)

  • 60% of employees said that meetings are a source of distraction (Udemy)

  • 40% of employees said that flexible/remote work options can lower workplace distractions, and 52% say they’re more productive when working remotely (Udemy)

  • More than 50% of millennials said remote work opportunities boosted productivity, and 75% said they’d prefer to have more opportunities to work remotely (Deloitte)

  • 77% of employees reported they are more productive when working away from the office (Upwork)

  • 70% of employees believe training could help them become more focused on the job and better at managing their time, but 66% have never asked their managers for such training (Udemy)

  • 75% of companies agree it takes more time this year than last year to find the right talent to fill positions (Randstad)
  • 24% of workers say their employers are putting in less effort to retain them; 15% say they are putting in more effort (Spherion)
  • 80% of HR pros say that employee engagement is an important area of focus for their organization (Temkin Group)
  • 67% of Gen X leaders said they would like more external coaching and 57% want external development (DDI)

  • 16% of HR leaders say a lack of budget is the primary obstacle to improving employee retention in the next 12 months (Kronos)

  • 14% of HR leaders say lack of executive support is an additional obstacle to improving retention in 2017; 13% cite a lack of organizational vision (Kronos)

  • 15% of HR leaders say a lack of funding is the biggest challenge to improving employee engagement (Kronos)

  • Employers believe the most challenging issues in the year ahead are:

    • Attracting strong, competent management and dedicated, capable staff (33%)
    • High employee turnover (26%)
    • Developing employees and future leaders for succession (23%)
    • Measuring and managing employee performance (18%)
    •  Managing the hiring process and tracking applicants (16%) (Oasis)
  • 33% of employers who have raised educational requirements have seen a positive effect on employee retention (CareerBuilder)
  • 27% of workers strongly agree that the feedback they currently receive helps them do their work better (Gallup
  • 30% of employees strongly agree that their manager involves them in setting goals at work; those who strongly agree with this statement are 3.6 times more likely than other employees to be engaged (Gallup)

  • Engagement plummets to 2% among teams with managers who ignore their employees, compared 61% for teams led by managers who focus on strengths (Gallup
  • Teams led by managers who focus on their weaknesses are 26% less likely to be engaged (Gallup
  • Among managers who oversee one to two employees, 59% report having no training at all, the same measure stands at 41% among managers who overs see three to five workers (West Monroe Partners)

  • 42% of new managers admit they developed their style by observing and mimicking a previous manager rather than through any type formal training (West Monroe Partners)

  • Nearly half of managers who had 10+ years of managerial experience said they’ve only received about nine total hours of training and 43% who have been manager for less than one year have had no training (West Monroe Partners)

  • Employees who believe that only obedience, predictability, deference to authority and competition with peers are valued are 32% less likely to be engaged, motivated and committed (Vitalsmarts)
  • 21% of employees strongly agree that their performance is managed in a way that motivates them to do outstanding work (Gallup)
  • Employees who say their manager consistently helps them manage their workload reported they were eight times as likely to stay with their current employer (Qualtrics)

  • Employees who claim their managers regularly acknowledge them for good work are 5 times more likely to stay (Qualtrics)

  • 76% of employees who do not feel valued are looking for other job opportunities  (Lifeworks)
  • 44% of Millennials say they would be more loyal to their organization if their CEO took a public position on a hotly debated issue; 19% say they would be less loyal if their CEO spoke out (Weber Shandwick)
  • 16% of Gen Xers and 18% of Boomers would be more loyal if their CEO spoke out about a hotly debated issue; 18% and 20%, respectively, would be less loyal (Weber Shandwick)
  • 60% of employees would take slightly less pay for an empathetic employer, and 77% would even work longer hours (Businessolver)

  • 33% would change to more empathetic employers for equal pay, and 20% would switch companies for less pay (Businessolver)
  • 90% of employees are more likely to stay with an organization that empathizes with their needs (Businessolver)

  • 80% of employees would be willing to work longer hours for an empathetic employer (Businessolver)

  • More than two-thirds of employees in tech, healthcare and financial services reported they would be willing to take slightly less pay for a more empathetic employer (Businessolver)

  • Nearly 80% of employees would consider leaving their current organization if it started being less empathetic (Businessolver)

  • 92% of employees say showing empathy is an important way to advance employee retention (Businessolver)
  • 66% of employees agree employers should express empathy through benefit packages, rather than corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs (Businessolver)
  • Highly engaged business units result in 21% greater profitability (Gallup)
  • Highly engaged business units realize a 41% reduction in absenteeism and a 17% increase in productivity (Gallup)
  • Highly engaged business units achieve a 10% increase in customer ratings and a 20% increase in sales (Gallup)
  • Teams that address engagement needs in their everyday work outperform bottom teams by an average 20% in sales and 10% in customer engagement (Gallup)
  • Business units with high employee engagement have 28% less internal theft and 21% higher productivity (Gallup
  • 26% of employees admit to sharing sensitive information outside the company (Sailpoint
  • Higher workplace engagement leads to 37% lower absenteeism, 41% fewer safety incidents, and 41% fewer quality defects (Gallup
  • 8% of global employees are actively disengaged and intend to stay at their organization (Aon Hewitt)
  • Disengaged workers cause massive losses in productivity – between $450 and $500 billion a year (Mental Health America)

  • Disengaged employees cost organizations between $450 and $550 billion annually (The Engagement Institute)
  • Millennials who feel they're at a great workplace are 25 times more likely to plan a long-term future at that workplace (Great Place to Work)
  • Workers who have a good work-life balance are 10% more likely to stay at their companies than those who don’t (TINYpulse)

  • Workers said they would rank work-life balance higher than salary when considering a job prospect (FlexJobs)

  • 54% of professionals’ career choices are motivated by seeking a healthy work/life balance (Execu│Search)

  • 95% of millennial employees report that work/life balance is important to them, with 70% saying it’s a very important aspect of their careers (Deloitte)

  • 22% of people have changed jobs due to work/life balance issues (Staples)
  • Millennials (29%) report that higher salary is the biggest contributor to their loyalty, compared to 20% of the broader workforce (Staples)
  • 38% of employees cite work responsibilities and 30% cite work/life balance as leading contributors to their loyalty (Staples)
  • 37% of Gen X contemplate leaving to advance their careers, 5% lower than millennials (DDI)

  • Workers ages 18-35 rank career advancement opportunities (32%) and work-life balance (34%) as most important to them at work (Comparably)

  • 41% of workers older than age 35 said work-life balance was the most important feature (Comparably)

  • 53% of employees say greater work-life balance and personal well-being are very important to them when considering whether to take a job with a different organization (Gallup)

  • 72% of workers didn’t accept the rationale for why they didn’t get a raise, and 71% who received no rationale said they planned to look for a new job within six months (PayScale)

  • Of employees that received some rationale as to why they didn’t get a raise, just over 25% actually believed it and of those who didn’t believe the rationale or didn’t receive one, more than 70% said they planned to seek a new job in the next six months (PayScale)

  • 57% of employees who believed the rationale they were given when not getting a raise and 42% of employees who did receive the raise they requested were planning to leave their job (PayScale)

  • 23% of active job seekers would take a new position without a pay increase (Hays)

  • 52% of U.S. workers said they are open to new job opportunities (Aon Hewitt)
  • 69% of employees are open to other opportunities or already seeking their next job (Rapt Media)
  • One third of employees at U.S. companies (with more than 1,000 employees) are currently looking for new jobs, with 86% citing their company’s broken processes as a driving factor behind the decision (Nintex)

  • 50% of US workers are constantly looking for the next job opportunity (ManpowerGroup Solutions)
  • 44% of US employees are actively looking for a new job (Aon Hewitt)
  • 63% of full-time employees are actively looking for a new job (ICIMS)
  • 44% of workers would leave their job for one with better pay (Robert Half)

  • 12% of workers say they would quit their job because they don’t feel appreciated (Robert Half)

  • 83% of HR managers say how someone quits their job can impact their future (Robert Half)

  • 58% of managers extend counteroffers to workers who say they’re leaving; these workers, on average, leave in less than two years later (Robert Half)

  • 42% of employees earning $75,000 or more intend to quit in the next 6 months (meQuilibrium)
  • 35% of hiring decision makers expect more employees to quit over the next 12 months (Glassdoor)

  • 3.2million people quit their jobs in October of 2017 (Robert Half)

  • Workers are twice as likely to quit their jobs after observing compliance violations (Gartner)

  • 59% of employees who observed a compliance violation said they were actively looking for another job compared to 29% who didn’t witness misconduct (Gartner)

  • 26% of U.S. employees say they will look for a new job within the next 12 months, 15% are already actively looking for a new job (Dale Carnegie Training)
  • 83% of full-time employees would consider leaving their current company (ICIMS)
  • 32% of workers ages 18-35 say they can see themselves leaving their job within a year (Comparably)

  • 24% of workers over 35 say they can see themselves leaving their job within a year vs 32% of millennials (Comparably)

  • 39% of job seekers say it's harder to find a job now than the year before (Jobvite
  • 51% of students say it is a good time to find a quality job (Gallup)
  • 49% of workers agree that their ability to find a new job has increased significantly over last year (Spherion)
  • 51% of Americans say now is a good time to find a good job in their local area (Gallup)
  • 51% of employees feel the expanding job market gives them more power to negotiate a higher salary, either with their current company or with another (Spherion)
  • 44% of job seekers are optimistic that they'll be able to find a job that suits their skills and qualifications (Jobvite
  • 63% of US workers say they likely would find a new job just as good as their current one if laid off (Gallup)
  • 37% of employees have searched for jobs while at their current job (Jobvite
  • 25% of workers felt they were adequately paid (Mental Health America)

  • 45% of workers said they rarely or never get the money they deserve (Mental Health America)estimated-cost-of-replacing-an-employee

  • 44% of employees say they would consider taking a job with a different company for a raise of 20% or less (Gallup
  • Just 37% of engaged employees would consider leaving for a 20% raise or less, compared to 54% of actively disengaged employees (Gallup
  • 46% of employees would consider a job that matched their current salary or even paid less (ADP)
  • 50% of millennials say they would consider taking a job with a different company for a raise of 20% or less (Gallup)
  • 77% of workers said they’d be more likely to accept a job offer if they knew they could telecommute at least some of the time (Robert Half)

  • 86% of employees between the ages 18-34 said they’d sooner sign a contract with remote work options (Robert Half)

  • 65% of employees older than 55 said they’d sooner sign a contract with remote work options (Robert Half)

  • 68% of recruiters and 53% of employers say candidates ask for work from home options “somewhat often” to “very often”. In addition, more than half of candidates say remote work is important when they’re considering their job options (MRINetwork)

  • 74% of workers said they would quit their current jobs to work for an organization offering remote-work options (Softchoice)

  • Companies that support remote work have 25% lower employee turnover than companies that don’t (Owl Labs)

  • 83% of workers participating in a mentoring program admitted that their experience positively influenced their desire to stay at their organization (River)

  • 49% of employees cited coworkers as a reason to stay over salary (48%), working conditions (46%) and job security (46%) (Ceridian)

  • 90% of millennials would choose to stay in a job for the next 10 years if they knew they'd get annual raises and upward career mobility (Qualtrics)
  • Engaged Millennials are 26% less likely than millennials who aren't engaged to say they would consider taking a job with a different company for a raise of 20% or less (Gallup)
  • 55% of managers and employees are either actively looking for a different job than the one they have now or watching for job opportunities (Gallup
  • 27% of companies say they’ve witnessed an increase in executives being lured away by other organizations (Hunt Scanlon)
  • 34% of leaders are either actively looking for a different job than the one they have now or watching for job opportunities (Gallup
  • 47% of employees are likely to look for a new job in the next year; 31% are extremely or very likely (Aflac
  • 60% of Millennials are open to a different job opportunity (15 percentage points higher than the percentage of non-millennials) (Gallup)
  • 36% of Millennials report that they will look for a job with a different organization in the next 12 months if the job market improves, compared with 21% of non-millennials (Gallup)
  • HR directors have a 43% switch rate (Indeed)

  • The lowest career-switching rates were among computer programmers and engineers, with Java developers (8%) and network engineers (25%) being the least likely to leave their careers (Indeed)

  • Engaged millennials are 64% less likely to say they will switch jobs if the job market improves in the next 12 months (Gallup)
  • 63% of employees who say processes for advancement are not clearly defined are looking for new jobs (Nintex)

  • 49% of Americans plan to spend six years or more at their current company (Finn Futures
  • 52% of workers who have been demoted ended up quitting their job, while 50% said they tried to be as gracious as possible when told the news (OfficeTeam)

  • 47% of workers who have been demoted said they got upset and later became disengaged at work, and another 41% said they focused on improving their performance while in the lower position (OfficeTeam)

  • 58% of employers who hire independent contractors agree that “non-employee contingent workers are not as loyal” (Burson Marsteller)
  • 41% of employees said they would only work for an employer offering agile work options (Spherion)

  • 39% of employees say they’ll likely consider making the shift to agile employment in the next two to three years (Randstad)
  • 50% of employees report feeling "neutral" or "disagreed" or "strongly disagreed" that the HR team made them feel more informed or engaged (EmployeeChannel)
  • 78% of companies have a documented employee engagement strategy and nearly 50% measure success (Maritz Motivation)
  • Employee engagement programs can increase profits by $2400 per employee per year (Workplace Research Foundation
  • 77% of  employees who strongly agree that they know what their company stands for and what makes it different from competitors strongly agree that they plan to be with the company for at least one year (Gallup)
  • 41% of employees strongly agree that they know what their company stands for and "what makes it different from competitors." (Gallup)
  • A 10% improvement in employees' connection with the mission or purpose of their organization would result in a 12.7% reduction in safety incidents, an 8.1% decrease in turnover, and a 4.4% increase in profitability (Gallup)
  • 47% of US workers don’t know or are unsure of what their employers’ core values are (Eagle Hill Consulting)
  • 75% of American workers care deeply about the well-being of their employer and only 23% say they have full insight into how their organizations are actually doing (Kimble Applications)

  • 46% of employees said they were not confident that the information provided by their employer regarding the overall health of the business is a fair representation of reality (Kimble Applications)

  • 31% of employees said that more transparency regarding the overall health of the business would allow them to better understand their employer’s goals (Kimble Applications)

  • 23% of employees said that more transparency regarding the overall health of the business would cause them to be more motivated, and 14% would be less likely to take a competing job offer (Kimble Applications)

  • 7% of employees say that more transparency would cause them to be more stressed (LinkedIn)
  • 80% of employees felt more engaged when their work was consistent with the core values and mission of their organization (IBM)
  • 41% of employees feel personally aligned with their company’s mission and  49% with their values, yet 94% of employees and 98% of employers say those connections are critical (Reward Gateway)

  • 71% of millennials who strongly agree that they know what their organization stands for and what makes it different from its competitors say they plan to be with their company for at least one year (Gallup)
  • Employees said they would leave their current job because: they want to find an organization with a higher purpose/stronger mission (12%); they are feeling unappreciated (12%); they feel bored or unchallenged (12%); they have a long commute (7%); it’s a bad culture fit (7%) or have a bad boss (6%) (OfficeTeam)

  • 54% of C-level execs say they have more unfilled positions than ever before (Cielo)

  • 65% of C-level execs expect flexible workers, contingent workers and project-based workers will take over a significant amount of the work currently being done by full-time employees (Cielo)

  • Total talent acquisition, a consistent and comprehensive approach to recruiting and hiring, is a top priority among 90% of C-level execs (Cielo)

  • Roughly 70% of executives indicate that over the last 5 years they’ve seen an increase in the number of Millennials (71%), Gen Xers (69%) and Baby Boomers (46%) who want the opportunity for more social purpose work while on the job (Covestro)

  • 88% of millennials found their job more fulfilling when they were provided opportunities to make a positive impact on social and environmental issues (Cone Communications)

  • 70% of executives say employees’ desire for purpose is impacting HR’s ability to recruit and retain top talent (69%), and 65% report it is transforming traditional approaches to talent recruitment and development, including compensation packages (Covestro)

  • 71% of executives say employees’ desire for purpose is prompting HR to rethink certain work policies and 67% say its compelling HR to work more closely with corporate social responsibility to create new policies and programs that give employees the opportunities to get involved in social projects (Covestro)

  • 68% of executives believe their employees would be more engaged in their work and perform at higher levels if they had opportunities to be challenged by working on purpose projects inside and/or outside the company (Covestro)

  • 83% of executives believe skills-based volunteerism (small teams of employees engaging in short-term consulting projects that aid nonprofit organizations and their causes) could help employees satisfy their desire for purpose and hone their teamwork and/or leadership abilities, develop new skills and/or strengthen existing ones (77%), and become more engaged and productive in their own work (67%) (Covestro)

  • 62% of executives see SBV (small teams of employees engaging in short-term consulting projects that aid nonprofit organizations and their causes) as a way to attract top talent, increase employee engagement (70%), and develop future leaders at their companies (80%) (Covestro)

  • Only 26% of executives say their companies have utilized skills-based volunteerism (Covestro)

  • 85% of employees said they were likely to stay longer with an employer that showed a high level of social responsibility (Ultimate Software)
  • 19% of executives said new hires, especially millennials, leave because they don’t like their organization’s culture (Korn Ferry)
  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 65% say they feel strongly about working for their organization a year from now, compared to 51% who don’t take a week off in the summer (O.C. Tanner)

  • 63% of employees wouldn’t consider a job opportunity that offered fewer than 15 paid vacation days (Randstad)

  • Cultures that support unplugging have employees that are more engaged and more likely to report feeling that their employer cares about them as a person (64% to 43%) and that their job is important (73% to 57%) (Project: Time Off)

  • 40% of employees in cultures that do not support unplugging are looking or planning to look for a new job in the next year and just 21% of employees in supportive cultures say the same (Project: Time Off)

  • 79% of employees who are leaving their current job due to poor company culture say that paid time off is extremely or very important in their next job (Project: Time Off)

  • 81.9% of employees would feel comfortable asking their supervisor for time off for a physical medical issue, and just 16.9% would feel comfortable requesting time off for a mental health issue (TAO Connect)

  • 32% of workers say they feel pressured not to take time off (TSheets)

  • 48% of employees said they do not get enough time off (TSheets)

  • 25% of workers said they will burn out in the next 12 months if they can’t reign in their stress levels (Wrike)

  • Almost 50% of workers say workplace stress is making them “check out” ceasing to care about work at some point in their careers (Wrike)

  • 60% of workers have searched for a new, less stressful job, and a quarter of them said they’ve quit a job because of stress (Wrike)

  • 43% of workers report they are often or always stressed, and one-third of these employees said the stress they experience at work is detrimental to their health (TSheets)

  • Stress levels were found to be higher among employees who do not get PTO and 51% of them say they are often or always stressed, with 58% describing it as unhealthy (TSheets)

  • 84% of the workforce currently has access to paid time off and 65% did not use all of their PTO allocation last year, with 18% blaming their workload (TSheets)

  • 46% of employees said they would take a lower paying job with more flexible working arrangements (TSheets)

  • 98% of HR professionals and 92% of employees surveyed said empathetic employers drive retention (Businessolver)
  • 55% of American employees (76% of Millennials), expect to change careers – not just jobs – at some point (Cornerstone)
  • 42% of employees say they expect to have three or more careers in their lifetimes (Cornerstone)
  • 67% of America's workforce who plan to change careers expect to do so within the next four years (Cornerstone)
  • 8% of employees say it is "very" or "fairly" likely they will be laid off this year, down from 15% in 2016 (Gallup)
  • 89% of employees would consider a lateral move within their company, but only 27% of them would consider a lateral move to work for a different company (Cornerstone)
  • 66% of employees will first look to see if there is an interesting and open position at their current company before looking elsewhere (Cornerstone)
  • 41% of employed workers over the age of 50 have spent two decades with the same company, including 18% who've stayed at least 30 years (Associated Press)
  • Top reasons for leaving a job: insufficient pay (44%), limited career paths (43%), lack of challenging work (30%), work-life balance (28%), and lack of recognition (27%) (Randstad)

  • 51% of employees would not consider a job that provides less flexibility than their current job (Alight Solutions)

  • Employees who feel their rewards meet their needs are seven times more likely to be engaged with work compared to employees who don’t feel that way (Alight Solutions)

  • 89% of employers said flexible working options are important when it comes to staff attraction and retention (Hays)

  • 33% of employees said flexible working options were critical to their remaining in employment (Hays)

  • 79% of employees with flexibility indicated that they were more happy at work (IBM)
  • 59% of Millennials say flexibility will improve productivity, 49% say it’ll improve their happiness (Staples)
  • 50% of advertising and marketing hiring decision makers think productivity would increase if their organizations adopted a compressed work schedule which would allow employees to work four 10-hr days a week (The Creative Group)

  • 76% of advertising and marketing hiring decision makers said they favor a policy that allows employees to do non-work-related tasks on company time to increase performance (The Creative Group)

  • 22% of millennials job hop within a company nearly twice as often as other generations (12%) (Visier)

  • 22% of millennial employees (ages 18-34) would consider taking a job with an organization that didn’t have a positive long-term outlook if it meant they’d be advancing their career in the short-term (LinkedIn)

  • 16% of employees ages 55+ would consider taking a job with an organization that didn’t have a positive long-term outlook if it meant they’d be advancing their career in the short-term (LinkedIn)

  • Among IT professionals who plan to leave, 75% are looking for a higher salary (Spiceworks)

  • 47% of Gen X would leave their current job for another offering more money and a more innovative environment (compared to only 42% of Millennials) (IBM
  • 68% of Millennials say the longest they would stay at a job they like is at least three years (Qualtrics)
  • 53% of CFOs say millennials are less loyal to the company (Duke/CFO
  • 25% of Millennials say their top career goal is to "Make a positive impact on my organization" (compared to 21% of GenX and 23% of Baby Boomers) (IBM
  • 47% of organizations run training and development programs to help build employees’ skills and support career development (Robert Half)

  • 52% of millennials say opportunities for career progression is the most desirable quality in a workplace, competitive wages and financial incentives (44%), good training and development programs (35%) (PWC
  • 31% of retail employees said that training makes them feel extremely engaged (Axonify)
  • 35% of employers trained low-skill workers and hired them for high-skill jobs in 2015, 33% plan to do the same this year (CareerBuilder
  • 85% of new professionals/soon to be college graduates said employee treatment and welfare were what they look for in future employers (Nielsen
  • 81% of U.S. college graduates are interested in working in another country and 75% said they were more likely to accept a job offer if a company offers work-abroad opportunities (Graebel)

  • 40% of employees planning to work past 70 feel they are stuck in their jobs, compared with just a quarter of those who expect to retire at 65 (28%) or before 65 (27%) (WTW)
  • 6% of workers have left a job because a romantic relationship with someone at work went sour (9% of women vs. 3% of men) (CareerBuilder)

  • 17% of employees reported quitting a position because of a bad manager (Addison Group)

  • 65% of employees left jobs in 2015 because they wanted more money (Payscale
  • 51% of employees who don’t feel they have the support of leadership plan to leave their job in the next year, compared to 25% of those who do have leadership support (American Psychological Association)
  • Employees with a high confidence level in their company’s senior leadership are 5 times as likely to remain with their employer more than 2 years compared to employees with no confidence (Qualtrics)

  • 59% of millennial employees who strongly agree that they can talk with their manager about "non-work-related issues" are engaged at work (Gallup)
  • 75% of employees would stay longer at an organization that listens to and addresses their concerns (Ultimate Software)
  • Almost 25% of millennials have worked for 5 different employers (O.C. Tanner)

  • Among millennials who worked at 5-7 organizations, 34% didn’t trust their direct manager, 31% said their organizations don’t set goals, and 48% said their organization thought only about profits (O.C. Tanner)

  • 80% of workers said they trusted their peers, only 72% trusted their bosses and just 65% trusted senior leaders (Globoforce)

  • 40% of employees choose to leave a job because of a "lack of advancement/opportunity" (Express Employment Professionals)
  • 40% of employees leave their job because they are unhappy with it (IBM)

  • 20% of employees left their job because they were unhappy with the organization (IBM)

  • 86% of C-suite leaders and 76% of senior management say corporate America is headed in the right direction, compared to 54% of staff-level employees (Addison Group)
  • 79% of employees would not accept a job with a higher salary from a company that failed to act in response to a report of sexual harassment (The Manifest)

     

  • 76% of employees wouldn’t join a company offering a higher salary that sells users’ data without users’ knowledge (The Manifest)

     

  • 72% of employees wouldn’t accept an employer that endangers the environment (The Manifest)

     

  • 71% of employees won’t tolerate companies paying women and minority employees less than others for doing the same job (The Manifest)

     

  • 69% of employees won’t accept companies that lobby against consumer protection regulations (The Manifest)

     

  • 54% of employees are willing to accept a higher salary to work for employers that make donations to political candidates they dislike, block labor unions from organizing (39%) and use legal loopholes to minimize their tax liability (38%) (The Manifest)

  • 35% of workers say an eco-friendly workplace is important to consider when looking at a new job, compared to over 50% of Millennials (Staples)
  • 90% of millennials said they consider a company's sustainability important, compared to 84% of GenX and 77% of Boomers (Lightspeed)
  • 81% of millennials expect companies to publicly pledge to be good corporate citizens (Horizon Media)
  • 63% of workers prioritize sustainability when considering employment (Staples)
  • Almost three-quarters of employees would be more likely to work for a company with a green footprint (Swytch)

  • About 40% of millennials have taken one job over another because of a company’s sustainability (Swytch)

  • 70% of millennials said a company’s sustainability would impact their decision to stay with a company for the long haul (Swytch)

  • 86% of new professionals/soon to be college graduates say it’s important that the company they work for behaves in a socially responsible way (Nielsen
  • 83% of executives say they will be increasing the use of contingent, intermittent or consultant employees (Oxford Economics
  • Reasons why employers like having a contingent workforce: the ability to adjust staffing levels based on economic volatility, protect their full-time workforce and maintain a higher-quality workforce (Spherion)

  • When asked the question, "Is job hopping losing its stigma?" 57% of Millennials say yes, compared to 38% of GenX, and 22% of Boomers (Accountemps
  • 25% of Millennials believe that staying at a job for seven months indicates they're loyal; Boomers believe that number is five years (Ultimate Software
  • 33% of employees knew whether they would stay at their company long-term after being on the job for one week or less; 63% knew within the first month (Ultimate Software
  • When companies select the top 20% most talented candidates for a role, they frequently realize a 10% increase in productivity, 20% increase in sales, 30% increase in profitability, 10% decrease in turnover and a 25% decrease in unscheduled absences (Gallup
  • Career satisfaction and work-life balance are the top reasons American employees stay at their current jobs (38% combined) (Cornerstone)
  • Employees who are engaged with their financial wellness program are likely to stay at the company (56%), stay or become healthy (50%) and remain productive in the office (45%) (Ernst & Young)

  • Top reasons given by employees for leaving their jobs: career development (22%), work-life balance (12%), managers' behavior (11%), compensation and benefits (9%) and wellbeing (9%) (Work Institute)
  • Employees prefer financial benefits, such as profit-sharing (40%), pensions (51%) and monetary bonuses (54%), and would be willing to change jobs to receive these benefits (Gallup)

  • 77% of employees said their favorite type of holiday bonus is cash; 15% said paid time off; and 5% said gift cards (Express Employment Professionals)

  • 29% of American employees resign due to work overload and lack of healthy work-life balance (Cornerstone)
  • 35% of workers are extremely or very satisfied with their ability to maintain work/life balance (Spherion)
  • 57% of employees feel confident expressing opinions during meetings, leaving over 40% of workers lacking confidence to speak their mind (Randstad)

  • 58% of women and 68% of men believe they can voice an unpopular opinion at work without negative consequences (SurveyMonkey)

  • 65% of IT pros stay in their jobs due to happiness at work, 19% cite convenience and 13% money (AlienVault
  • 37% of IT professionals plan to look for a new job in 2017 and 26% expect to accept a job offer (Spiceworks)
  • 69% IT professionals plan to look for a new job in 2017 to advance their career; 64% for a more competitive salary; 40% for a company that prioritizes IT (Spiceworks)
  • 32% of young women only keep their existing jobs just to pay off college debt (1000 Dreams Fund)
  • 88% of HR pros have confidence in finding a new job (SHRM)
  • 19% of HR pros admit to looking for a new job (SHRM)
  • 42% of HR job seekers say salary is a key driver; 37% cite career advancement opportunities (SHRM)
  • 27% of HR managers said that how employees leave greatly affects their careers; 56% said there’s somewhat of an effect, and 16% said there’s no effect at all (OfficeTeam)

  • 62% of employers said that they would extend a counter offer in order to keep their best employees (Execu-Search)
  • 55% of employees said that they would reject a counter offer from their current employer (Execu-Search)
  • 64% of HR professionals said sourcing quality applicants was challenging (XpertHR)

  • 84% of companies fail to personalize the candidate experience throughout the recruiting process; more than half don’t explain their employee value proposition; and 98% don’t inform candidates of their application status (Phenom People)

  • About 14% of job seekers didn’t feel respected throughout their most recent job search (Monster)

  • Candidates who received feedback on the same day as their interview were 52% more likely to increase their relationship with a prospective employer (Talent Board)

  • Responding to applicants no later than 72 hours from initial contact avoids losing the opportunity to schedule an interview (Hireology)

  • Texting job applicants reduces time-to-hire by a full 8 days, while increasing interview completion rate by 20% (Hireology)

  • 60% of employers believe employees often hear about new job openings within the company, only about 30% of employees say they actually do (ADP)
  • 94% of senior managers would rehire ex-employees who left their companies on good terms (Accountemps)

  • 52% of workers would apply for a job with a previous employer (Accountemps)

  • Reasons cited for not wanting to work for a former employer: dissatisfaction with leadership (22%), didn’t fit organizational culture (17%), unfulfilling duties (13%) and bridges burned by the company (11%) (Accountemps)

  • 29% American workers say they have “boomeranged” at least once in their career, and 41% say they would consider going back to a former workplace (Spherion)
  • 52%) of employees said their company currently employs at least one boomerang worker (Spherion)
  • 37% of employees believe their company favors hiring boomerang employees to save money on recruitment and training, while also minimizing risk (Spherion)
  • 33% of employees say the ability to collaborate makes them more loyal (The Economist)
  • Employers rated by employees as “pioneers” in supporting mobile technology saw better productivity (16%), creativity (18%), satisfaction (23%) and loyalty (21%) (The Economist)
  • 85% of employees who feel their company’s technology is ahead of the curve say they love their jobs (Adobe)
  • 70% of employees believe technology improves work-life balance (Adobe)
  • 92% of employees say that having the technology to do their job efficiently affects their work satisfaction (Ultimate Software)
  • 36% of employees say they would leave for a job with a more "digitally progressive" employer  (Sungard)
  • 83% of employees with opportunities to take on new challenges say they’re more likely to stay with the organization (ReportLinker)
  • 78% of employees who say their company encourages creativity and innovation are committed to their employer (ReportLinker)
  • 86% of employees said they’d stay with a company for at least five years if their employer helped pay down their student loans (American Student Assistance)
  • 60% of CFOs report that their workers are more engaged on the job compared to three years ago; 52% of CFOs believe this number is insufficient (Robert Half)
  • 45% of employees would feel more engaged with their job if their employer helped them better understand the impact of taxes and deductions (Kronos)
  • New hires say their top concern is understanding what their boss expects from them, followed by worries about learning how to perform their job, and just one-third felt their onboarding gave them the tools and resources needed to address these concerns (TalentLMS)

  • 80% of employees said the onboarding process was an important moment at work – yet 1 in 3 would prefer to go on an awkward first date rather than attend onboarding or orientation for a new job (ServiceNow)

  • About 80% of workers experienced some issues when starting a new job (ServiceNow)

  • One-third of workers said they received no necessary training, while 28% were unsure of their responsibilities and goals (ServiceNow)

  • Around 25% of workers said they received no clear onboarding, while roughly the same amount admitted to IT issues (ServiceNow)

  • Nearly 20% of workers believed they were not fully onboarded after three months on the job (ServiceNow)

  • 58% of new hires ask for a walk-through of key processes or want a buddy they can turn to for questions (ServiceNow)

  • One in ten new hires reported their company forgot it was their first day on the job (ServiceNow)

  • When the onboarding experience is not positive, new hires are twice as likely to quit their job compared to those who have a good onboarding experience (ServiceNow)

  • 39% of new hires received company-culture training in the onboarding process (TalentLMS)

  • 27% of new hires said their onboarding was exclusively online, but most said they prefer a mix of online and offline methods (TalentLMS)

  • 76% of HR leaders said their onboarding processes are underutilized and another 24% didn’t even have an onboarding strategy (Kronos)

  • Employees said their top concerns during their job search would be their experience in the hiring process, the number of perks, programs and benefits a company offers to help workers with work-life balance and their connection with a company’s culture and values (Spherion)

  • Organizations with poorly handled onboarding are twice as likely to cause new hires to seek new opportunities in the near future (Digitate)

  • The new hire onboard experience sets a tone which, if negative, can leave 25% of new hires unlikely to recommend the employer to a family member or friend (Digitate)

  • 53% of HR professionals say employee engagement rises when onboarding is improved (SilkRoad)
  • 28% of new hires are willing to quit their new jobs if they don’t find it satisfactory in the first 90 days (Robert Half)
  • New hires who reported a poor onboarding experience are 8x more likely to be disengaged in their work and 11x less likely to recommend their employer as a good place to work after their first three months (Glint)
  • 98% of executives say onboarding programs are a key factor in retention efforts (Korn Ferry)
  • 78% of organizations are concerned with talent retention, 73% with talent attraction and just over half a need to pay for performance (Mercer)

  • 91% of employees stick around for at least a year at a new company, and 69% of them stick around for at least 3 years if the company has a well-structured onboarding program (TLMM)

  • 65% of CFOs said finding skilled professionals to fill job openings was at least somewhat challenging (Robert Half)

  • 50% of HR leaders said talent scarcity was a concern, and 90% of C-suite execs said they expect talent competition to increase even more in the upcoming few years (Mercer)

  • 90% of CFOs said the competitive hiring environment is complicating their companies’ ability to recruit talent (Robert Half)

  • 80% of HR leaders think their organizations will be affected by scarcity of talent this year (Randstad)
  • Tech employers account for 10% of the nation’s jobs and 86% of recruiters and hiring managers still have trouble filling tech openings (Indeed)

  • 51% of employers say that using benefits to retain employees will become even more important in the next 3 to 5 years (MetLife)
  • 56% of employees say additional PTO would make them more loyal to an organization (Fierce)
  • 75% of small business employees are very or extremely happy working for a small employer (Aflac)
  • 89% of employees age 71 and older say they are very or extremely happy working for a small employer, compared with 70% of workers ages 18 to 36 (Aflac)
  • Top five reasons employees say they like working for small businesses: flexible scheduling (27%), seeing the fruits of their labor (23%), feeling their input matters (17%), being rewarded for hard work (14%) and getting noticed by people who matter (9%) (Aflac)
  • 86% of small business employees say they know how their job fits into their employer’s long-term plans (Aflac)
  • 43% of employees said annual leave is the work-related benefit that would make them feel most loved at work, followed by public recognition (15%), team drinks (15%), training (10%), professional mentoring (7%), sleeping in once a week (7%), and getting a parking space for a month (2%) (Xexec)

  • 26% of small-business employees would jump ship to a larger company if it meant better benefits offerings (Aflac)
  • 72% of employees say that having the ability to customize their benefits would increase their loyalty to their current employer (MetLife)
  • 76% of millennials reported that benefits customization is important for increasing their loyalty, compared to 67% of baby boomers (MetLife)
  • 62% of employees under 50 wouldn't consider working for a company that didn't offer voluntary benefits (BenefitsPro)
  • 66% of firms believe educating staff about the benefits of saving through workplace pensions can help influence employee engagement on pensions, wider financial education (58%), the use of simpler language and minimal jargon in pension communication (63%), technology (54%), and individualizing pension communications as far as possible (49%) (CBI)

  • Health coverage is the reason 56% of employees remain on their current job (American’s Health Insurance Plans)

  • 57% of people say that if their employer proactively supported their mental wellbeing, it would help them to feel more loyal, be more productive and take less time off work (Health Shield)

  • 90% of employees said that struggling with mental health issues stops them from thriving at work and performing to the best of their ability (Health Shield)

  • 56% of Americans said their health plan is the reason they’ve stayed at their current job (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 62% of participants in wellness programs say their productivity has improved, 56% have had fewer sick days and 30% say they had a disease detected thanks to these programs (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 67% of participants in wellness programs reported reduced bodyweight and 23% quit smoking or other nicotine use (UnitedHealthcare)

  • 46% of employees at companies offering 7-8 health and wellness program categories strongly agreed they are proud to be a part of the company, compared with only 14% of employees whose employer offered no programs (Optum)

  • 26% of employees at companies offering 7-8 health and wellness program categories strongly felt their employer takes a genuine interest in their well-being, compared with only 3% of employees whose employer offered 1-3 program categories (Optum)

  • 35% of employees at companies offering 7-8 health and wellness program categories said they were extremely likely to recommend their employer, compared to 14% of employees at companies offering 1-3 program categories (Optum)

  • 30% of employees who frequently participate in wellness programs strongly agreed their employer values them, while only 19% of workers who occasionally participate felt similarly (Optum)

  • 22% of employees who frequently participate in health and wellness programs strongly agreed that their employer makes healthy choices compared to just 6% of those who never participate (Optum)

  • Nearly half of workers who frequently participate in wellness programs report having a good relationship with co-workers (Optum)

  • 35% of employees frequently participating in wellness programs believed their employer promotes positive relationships among colleagues, yet only 23% of employees who don’t participate felt that way (Optum)

  • 29% of employees who frequently participate in health and wellness programs believe they are much better than coworkers at meeting or exceeding job requirements and deadlines, compared with 20% of those who never participate (Optum)

  • 59% of employees say that health and wellness benefits are important for increasing loyalty to their employer (MetLife)
  • 53% of employees said that financial planning programs are important for increasing loyalty (MetLife)
  • 68% of workers want comprehensive financial planning to help them plan for healthcare costs in retirement and figure out how much they need to save for their post-work years (EBRI)

  • 83% of employees say health insurance is very or extremely important in deciding whether to stay in or change jobs (EBRI)

  • 42% of employed cancer patients and survivors feel they need to stay at their current workplace because they need health insurance (Cancer and Careers)
  • 27% of companies conduct "stay interviews" to reduce turnover, 24% plan to implement them (Challenger, Gray & Christmas)
  • 88% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces plan to stay at the company for the next 12 months vs. 73% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 72% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces would decline a job offer with another company at similar pay vs. 44% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel fully engaged with their work vs. 65% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees say implementing pet-friendly policies would increase company loyalty (Banfield)
  • 58% of people with disabilities that are not visibly detectable say they are happy going to work each day (Working Mother Research Institute)
  • 17% of retail managers feel their employees are "very motivated and engaged" (WorkJam)
  • 47% of retail managers say at least 5% of their staff quit in an average three-month period (WorkJam)
  • 63% of retail managers believe reducing turnover by as little as one associate per month could lift monthly revenues by at least 6% (WorkJam)
  • 92% of retail leaders agree that preventing the loss of even one hourly associate per month would drive meaningful profits (WorkJam)

  • The top four reasons retail employees leave their jobs – poor management, scheduling difficulties, lack of training, falling wages (WorkJam)

  • 62% of retail managers say they have lost employees due to scheduling conflicts (WorkJam)

Workplace Satisfaction Statistics

  • 7% of the world’s 3.3 billion adults who are working or looking for work have a great job (Gallup)
  • 55% of full-time employees rank fair compensation as the first or second most valuable employer attribute, closely followed by fair treatment (54%) and ethical standards (38%) (Clutch)

  • 61% of employees are satisfied with their benefits compared with 46% in 2011 (Aflac)

  • 65% of American workers are satisfied in their jobs, up from 49% in 2011 (Aflac)

  • 81% of employers that offer benefits agree their company’s benefits offerings increase employee satisfaction (Aflac)

  • 9% of employees said more paid time off would most improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 41% of employees said a higher salary would improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 88% of U.S. employees reported overall satisfaction with their current job in 2015, marking the highest level of satisfaction over the last decade (SHRM)
  • 10% of employees rate their employee experience a 10 out of 10 (YouEarnedIt)
  • 70% of American employees say they love their jobs (Adobe)
  • 65% of millennials are satisfied in their current jobs (LaSalle)

  • 39% of employees rated themselves as unhappy about their rewards, 26% are happy and 33% are neutral (Peakon)

  • 36% of employees are satisfied with their workload, 39% are neutral and 24% are unhappy (Peakon)

  • 36% of employees are satisfied with their career growth, 33% are neutral and 29% dissatisfied (Peakon)

  • 58% of employees are happy with the support they receive from management, 14% are unhappy and 26% are neutral (Peakon)

  • 47% of workers felt happy with the meaningfulness of their work, 35% are unsure and 17% are unhappy (Peakon)

  • 62% of millennials are generally satisfied with their benefits, and 63% with their company culture (LaSalle)

  • 45% of millennials are pleased with their career path, and 49% with training and development programs at their company (LaSalle)

  • 51% of workers said they are satisfied with their current jobs, but gave their employers’ development opportunities a poor grade (The Conference Board)

  • Employees who work in fully-enabled digital workplaces where new workplace technologies are in widespread use were 51% more likely to have strong job satisfaction, 43% more likely to be positive about their work-life balance, 60% more likely to say they are motivated at work, and 91% more likely to praise their company’s vision (Aruba)

  • 73% of employees who work in a fully-enabled digital workplace reported a positive impact on their productivity and 70% cited improved collaboration thanks to digital technologies vs. 55% those who don’t work in a fully-enabled digital workplace (Aruba)

  • More than 50% of digital workers at technology laggard organizations expressed frustration with their employer vs. 6% of workers at technology leader organizations (Unisys)

  • 75% of employees said HR communicated with them rarely, sometimes or never (Employee Channel)

  • 42% of organizations are restructuring their HR operations or revising their strategies to leverage digital tools, and only 51% of that numbers said they’re effective at doing so (Randstad)

  • 89% of employees said disjointed digital communication tanks employee morale, lowers productivity and impacts customer satisfaction and the bottom line (RingCentral)

  • 75% of employees said disjointed communications tech complicates how they collaborate with colleagues, frustrates their productivity and makes them unhappy at work (RingCentral)

  • 92% of employees said a seamless platform would allow them to connect to and communicate with co-workers and customers, which would raise job satisfaction (RingCentral)

  • 86% of employees said a seamless platform would raise a company’s profitability and 83% said it would entice them to stay longer at a company (RingCentral)

  • 73% of full-time U.S. workers expect their employer to provide a high-level of employee self-service, allowing them to independently complete a variety of HR-related tasks (Paychex)

  • 62% of full-time workers in businesses with 50 employees or less said they expect any employer to offer at least some level of HR automation, and 60% of workers in businesses with less than 10 workers expect these offerings (Paychex)

  • Technology tops the list of what fulfills employees’ basic needs: a work computer/laptop/device (75%); fast internet and Wi-Fi (68%); office space/cubicle space (55%); and air conditioning and heating (47%) (Randstad)

  • The top factors cited for job satisfaction were: having the latest digital and technology skills; savings or financial assistance programs and vacation (Randstad)

  • A little more than 50% of employers said they’re in the transformative stage of digitization, while only 38% described themselves as proficient (Randstad)

  • 71% of employees said they would welcome a fully automated workplace in the future (Aruba)

  • 80% of workers find aspects of their job below their skills level (Conversica)

  • 62% of workers said their work has a significant amount of drudgery (Conversica)

  • 42% of workers spend 30 min of every hour doing busy work, and 71% said too much busy work makes them feel as though their lives are being wasted (Conversica)

  • 50% of workers advocated automating their busy work, and 97% said their brains work better and they’re happier, smarter and more efficient when they’re engaged in new and challenging work (Conversica)

  • If freed up by AI, 44% of workers said they could focus on more rewarding work, 42% would be motivated to get more work done each day and 32% could showcase their true abilities and talents (Conversica)

  • Workplaces that adopt AI and robotic process automation are 33% more likely to improve the employee experience and see higher returns on performance than workplaces that don’t leverage the technology (University of London)

  • 77% of nonprofit workers are somewhat or highly satisfied in their current position, even though 52% say they are financially uncomfortable (Work for Good)

  • 40% of Millennials have high job satisfaction (Deloitte
  • 80% of Americans would continue working even after winning the lottery; 51% would continue working at their current job (Adobe)
  • In a ranking of 35 countries, Colombia ranks highest for job happiness globally while Japan ranks last (Indeed
  • Cities with the happiest workers: Los Angeles, Miami, San Diego (Indeed
  • Cities with the lowest level of job satisfaction: Denver, Indianapolis, Louisville (Indeed
  • Over 50% of employees say they can’t access their benefits in the way they prefer and 21% say they can easily access their benefits (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 90% of employers said the move to a benefits marketplace helped simplify their benefits administration process (WTW)

  • 97% of employees preferred choosing their own benefits, rather than have their employer choose for them (WTW)

  • 96% of employees said they were content with the enrollment and shopping experience for benefits (WTW)

  • Employee satisfaction with benefits rose to 95% in 2018 from 92% in 2016, while employer satisfaction with benefit offerings rose to 99% - a 22% increase from 77% in 2016 (WTW)

  • 47% of employees feel underpaid, 44% are dissatisfied with benefits and 43% feel unsatisfied with their career path (Addison Group)

  • 46% of employees that discuss benefits face-to-face with an employer report being satisfied (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • Gen Xers are slightly more satisfied with their benefits than millennials (53% vs 52%), and 49% of boomers report they are satisfied with their benefits (LIMRA)

  • 80% of employees who ranked their benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high also ranked job satisfaction as extremely or very high (EBRI)

  • Nearly two-thirds of employees who ranked benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high ranked their moral as excellent or very good (EBRI)

  • 43% of workers said their benefits package gives them more choice and variety to meet their needs, and 27% believe their employer’s offerings help them manage their finances (WTW)

  • Organizations whose leaders actively participated in health and well-being programs reported higher rates of employee satisfaction with health and well-being programs (83%) and employee perception of organizational support (85%) than organizations whose leaders didn’t actively participate (HERO & Mercer)

  • 59% of workers think their retirement plan meets their needs, and 66% believe their healthcare plan meets their needs (WTW)

  • 62% of employees said their employer does not act as a resource for healthcare-related questions (Maestro Health)

  • 71% of Americans are satisfied with their current employer-sponsored health plan (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 67% of millennials, 62% of gen x and 61% of baby boomers believe their employer’s benefit plans are competitive with those offered by other organizations (PwC)

  • 75% of millennials, 75% of Gen S and 85% of baby boomers say they have a good understanding of employer benefit and savings plans and the role those plans play in their overall financial well-being (PwC)

  • 52% of employees say they understand their health benefits and 43% indicate they understand their non-health benefits very/extremely well (EBRI)

  • 31% of employees indicate their employer or benefits company provides no education or advice on benefits (EBRI)

  • 39% of employees state that their employer provides education on how health insurance works, 24% say that their employer provides education n how a health savings account works, and 28% confirm that their employer offers education on how to invest money in their retirement plan (EBRI)

  • 71% of adults with employer-provided coverage are satisfied with their current health insurance plan, while 19% are dissatisfied and 9% say they have neither favorable nor unfavorable opinions (AHIP)

  • 66% of employees who receive perks are satisfied with them (Clutch)

  • 49% of employees say that receiving perks/benefits means they know that their employers are invested in them as individuals (Clutch)

  • 42% of UK employees are calling in sick claiming a physical illness when in reality it’s a mental health issue (BHSF)

  • Despite claiming to have a physical health problem when calling in sick, UK employees admit it’s actually stress (21%), anxiety (18%) and/or depression (20%) (BHSF)

  • 42% of employees have called in sick claiming a physical illness when in reality it’s a mental health issue (BHSF)

  • 24% of employees worry that if they did need to take a sick day due to a mental health issue, they wouldn’t be taken seriously (BHSF)

  • 60% of employees who sought their direct supervisor’s assistance when combating a health condition at work were fearful of losing their job when reaching out (Standard Insurance Company)

  • Employees who worked with an HR manager on combating a health condition were able to return to work 44% faster than those who sought their supervisor’s help (Standard Insurance Company)

  • A little less than 75% of employees said their work has conflicted with their efforts to tend to their health (Flexjobs)

  • Three in five workers have agreed to take on more tasks than they can actually get done on their to-do lists (VitalSmarts)

  • One in five workers said they’ve reached their limit and can’t commit themselves to doing more and one in three always have more things on their to-do lists than they can get done (VitalSmarts)

  • 60% of workers have more than 60 personal and work-related tasks to accomplish each week, while 15% have more than 100 tasks (VitalSmarts)

  • 73% of workers say their to-do lists become overgrown because they want to be accommodating, helpful and polite; 56% because they have a tendency to solve problems; 39% because no clear limits or rules about which tasks they should accept or reject exist (VitalSmarts)

  • 50% of workers are moderately stressed, while 35% are highly stressed and 9% are highly stressed (VitalSmarts)

  • 52% of workers worry about disappointing themselves or others and 20% said they regret taking on so many tasks in the first place (VitalSmarts)

  • 94% of workers reported high levels of work-related stress and 54% said stress caused them to lose sleep (VitalSmarts)

  • 65% of professionals are more stressed out at work than they were five years ago (Korn Ferry)

  • 35% of professionals said their boss was their biggest stress trigger and 80% said it was an organizational change (Korn Ferry)

  • More than 75% of professionals said stress at work has negatively affected their personal relationships (Korn Ferry)

  • Two-thirds of professionals said they’ve lost sleep because of work stressors and 16% said job-related stress forced them to quit (Korn Ferry)

  • 79% of professionals found a heavy workload to be less stressful than not having enough work to do, and 74% would prefer a heavier workload and more pay to less work and less pay (Korn Ferry)

  • All but 6% of 1,600 U.S. and U.K. workers said they suffer from stress, and at least a third of them said they’ve experienced “high” or “unsustainably high” stress (Wrike)

  • 54% of workers cited stress as having a negative effect on their home life at least once a week (Wrike)

  • More than half of workers said they had lost sleep because of stress and a quarter reported a decline in work quality due to stress (Wrike)

  • 56% of employees admitted to suffering from stress, 36% from anxiety and 25% from depression (BHSF)

  • 46% of employees admit that work is the main cause of their mental health problems and 15% would tell their boss if they were struggling with an issue of this nature (BHSF)

  • 27% of employees still believe that a mental health problem would carry a stigma and 36% are scared of what their colleagues might think (BHSF)

  • 21% of employees receive dedicated mental health support from their employer, and an average of 8.4 sick days are taken each year due to a mental health problem (BHSF)

  • 27% of employees would like to have open conversations about mental health within the workplace (BHSF)

  • 23% of employees said they would feel more supported if dedicated days off were allocated for mental wellbeing, and a further 22% would benefit from dedicated mental health support staff (BHSF)

  • 75% of U.S. millennial workers said the work environment should be flexible and fluid (American Express)

  • In mentally healthy organizations, 52% of employees enjoyed flexible work arrangements, 75% reported open door and relaxed work environments, and 69% were offered professional development opportunities (Mental Health America)

  • 75% of workers say it should take less than seven hours each day to do their job (The Workforce Institute & Kronos)

     

  • Roughly 25% of Gen Z, 18% of Millennials, 16% of Gen X and 12% of Boomers are dissatisfied with their work-life balance (Stanford University)

  • 62% of workers agree their job offers enough flexibility to have a healthy work-life balance, while 14% disagree (The Workforce Institute & Kronos)

  • 85% of employees said they felt overwhelmed, extremely down or experiencing negative feelings that interfered with their ability to work (TAO Connect)

  • 59% of employees had actually experienced a struggle with mental health in the workplace (TAO Connect)

  • 49% of employees feared their supervisor would judge them or treat them differently for needing time off for therapy (TAO Connect)

  • Two-thirds of workers believe their job is having a significant impact on their mental and behavioral health (Mental Health America)

  • 63% of workers said they have always, often or sometimes taken part in unhealthy behaviors such as drinking or crying regularly (Mental Health America)

  • 50% of employees would most appreciate access to face-to-face counseling to help support any mental health issues they are dealing with (Health Shield)

  • Job satisfaction contributors employee cited as very important: Respectful treatment of all employees at all levels (67%), Compensation (63%), Benefits (60%), Job security (58%), Trust between employees and senior management (55%) (SHRM)
  • Millennials' top job satisfaction contributors: Respectful treatment (66%), compensation (65%), benefits (61%), job security (58%) (SHRM)
  • More than 90% of workers in each age group think it’s important for an organization to be socially responsible (Paychex)

  • Traits Millennials look for in employers: Treat employees fairly (73.1%), corporate social responsibility (46.6%), brand image (39.5%), prestige (30.5%) (NSHSS)
  • Work atmosphere traits Millennials seek in employers: work/life balance (69.2%), friendly coworkers (57.3%), friendly to people of all backgrounds (55.3%) (NSHSS)
  • 54% of high performing employees say their workspaces are too distracting (Hacker Noon)
  • 51% of employees say the open-office mode has not brought significant improvement in the quality of their work (Teem)
  • Employees aren’t thrilled with the open office design, with 52% saying there are distractions created by an open office layout and 40% say their office space is too open (Staples)

  • Two-thirds of employees with disabilities say their office space is physically supportive compared to 82% of workers with no disability (Staples)

  • 77% of employees without disabilities say their office spaces enable productivity, but just 64% of employees with disabilities agree (Staples)

  • 80% of employees say their offices are set up in a way that allows them to be efficient (Staples)

  • 73% of employees say their offices help them be better at what they do (Staples)

  • 60% of workers say work-related pressure has increased in the last five years (Accountemps)
  • 36% of managers report spending three to four hours per day on administrative work and 44% frequently feel overwhelmed at work (West Monroe Partners)

  • 64% of Millennials say they’re overwhelmed at work compared with 59% of professionals age 35 to 54 and 35% of workers ages 55+ (Accountemps)
  • Top sources of workplace stress: Heavy workload/looming deadlines (33%), Unrealistic expectations of managers (22%), Attaining work-life balance (22%), Coworker conflicts (15%) (Accountemps)
  • 51% of employees were uneasy about asking managers for time off during the holiday season (West Monroe Partner)

  • 60% of employees report being stressed all or most of the time at work (Udemy)

  • 78% of HR leaders report feeling stressed at work in both 2017 and 2018 (Paychex)

  • The biggest sources of stress for workers during the holidays are: balancing work duties with holiday events (32%), taking time off and coming back to a heavy workload (23%), and having fewer coworkers to take on some of the duties (18%) (Accountemps)

  • 43% of employees worry that artificial intelligence and new technology will replace them (Udemy)

  • 34% of employees are concerned that artificial intelligence could someday totally replace them (The Workforce Institute)

  • 80% of employees see significant opportunity for artificial intelligence to create a more engaging and empowering workplace experience, yet admit a lack of transparency from their employers is a primary driver of fear and concern (The Workforce Institute)

  • Two-thirds of employees said they’d feel more at ease with AI if employers were more transparent about the future (The Workforce Institute)

  • 64% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it simplified or automated time consuming internal processes (Coleman)

  • 64% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it helped better balance their workload (Coleman)

  • 62% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it increased fairness in subjective decisions (Coleman)

  • 57% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it ensured managers made better choices affecting individual employees (Coleman)

  • 62% of U.S. employees felt artificial intelligence would simplify time consuming processes, and better balance their workload (64%) (Coleman)

  • 88% of global Gen Z employees believe artificial intelligence can improve their job in some manner, but just 70% of baby boomers feel the same way (Coleman)

  • 48% U.S. Gen Z employees see the biggest benefit of artificial intelligence as its ability to create an overall fairer working environment (Coleman)

  • 38% of U.S. baby boomer employees either don’t think or aren’t sure how artificial intelligence would improve their job (Coleman)

  • While 82% of employees see opportunity for artificial intelligence to improve their jobs, 34% expressed concern that AI could someday replace them altogether, including 42% of Gen Z employees (Coleman)

  • Away from work, 50% of employees say the top stress is the current political climate (Udemy)

  • Workplace stress accounts for as much as $190 billion in healthcare costs (Udemy)

  • 35% of remote workers said their colleagues team up against them (VitalSmarts)

  • 52% of remote workers found their colleagues treat them unfairly (VitalSmarts)

  • 67% of remote workers claim their colleagues don’t support their priorities (VitalSmarts)

  • Workers said that signing up for benefits made them feel stressed (21%), confused (22%) and anxious (20%) (Unum)

  • Top workplace stressors: deadlines (30%), physical risk (17%), competitiveness (10%) (CareerCast)
  • 80% of employees’ say their greatest source of stress is not spending as much time at home (Paychex)
  • 82% of employees said their jobs fall on the more stressful end (CareerCast)
  • 92% of employers say their workforce is stressed (IFEBP)
  • Of those who missed work due to stress, 35% missed 3-5 days a month, 38% missed six days or more, and 14% stayed away for between 21-30+ days (Mental Health America)

  • 21% of workers report checking email outside of normal working hours and reviewing and responding to it the same way they would during normal working hours (Gallup)
  • 11% of workers say the amount of emails they have to respond to during personal time is unreasonable (Gallup)
  • 35% of workers feel burned out (Kimble Applications)
  • 33% of employees say they must work long hours to get work done and stay ahead of their workload (Kimble Applications)
  • 74% of employees 30 years old or older say lack of sleep affects their performance (Humana)
  • 66% of working adults say they would be better employees if they got more sleep (Glassdoor)

  • Top employer attributes that jobseekers value most: salary and employee benefits, long-term job security, pleasant working atmosphere (Randstad)
  • 33% of American employees are satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs (Oxford Economics
  • Coworker relationships is a contributor to a positive employee experience (16%) (Globoforce)

  • 71% of employees believe their senior leaders should go to a greater extent to improve the employee experience (IBM)

  • 38% of U.S. hourly workers who make $20 or less per hour say they’re struggling to make ends meet (Snag)

  • 80% of underemployed workers are willing to work more than one job to earn a living wage, but 74% would prefer having one full-time, decent-paying job (Snag)

  • 54% of underemployed workers are actively looking for a better-paying full-time job (Snag)

  • 47% of restaurant workers, 41% of retail workers and 38% of hospitality workers consider themselves underemployed (Snag)

  • 51% of recent grads feel like they're underemployed (Accenture)
  • 45% of women feel unsupported professionally by their bosses, versus 30% of men who feel the same (Udemy)

  • 69% of employees (37% of women, 35% of older employers, 37% of employees without college degrees and 36% of non-managers) reported feeling pressured to demonstrate their value to their organization within three months on the job (Udemy)

  • 76% of employees said they currently have or recently had a toxic boss (Monster)

  • 19% of employees view their bosses as mentors, people they can learn from and trust (Monster)

  • 80% of employees are happy with their bosses (OfficeTeam)

  • Nearly half of employees said they view their bosses as good leaders, 37% see their bosses as mentors and 34% consider their boss a friend (OfficeTeam)

  • 58% of workers said that a bad boss’ worse trait is not setting clear goals (The Predictive Index)

  • 54% of workers said bad bosses bad mouth colleagues and are focused on proving themselves right (52%) (The Predictive Index)

  • 82% of workers say that good bosses have a high work ethic, are honest (80%) and confident (79%) (The Predictive Index)

  • Female bosses earned an average rating of 7.3 vs. men of 7.2 (The Predictive Index)

  • Bosses who gave the right amount of feedback earned an average score of 8.6 from workers (The Predictive Index)

  • 22% of senior decision-makers don’t think that regular recognition and thanking employees at work has a big influence on staff retention; 70% of employees say that motivation and morale would improve “massively” with managers saying thank you more (Reward Gateway)
  • 86% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program benefits employee relationships (Globoforce)

  • 85% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program has a positive effect on organizational culture (Globoforce)

  • 84% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program helps employee engagement (Globoforce)

  • 83% of HR Leaders say an employee recognition program benefits organizational values (Globoforce)

  • 89% of HR executives feel that recognition programs are improving the employee experience (Globoforce)

  • 80% of companies believe their recognition programs are at least moderately effective in driving employee engagement, and 22% say their programs are very effective (Maritz Motivation)
  • 29% of employees feel valued in their jobs (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 69% of men and 64% of women said they feel valued by their employers (Sharefile)

  • One-third of U.S. employees give their companies high marks on career performance, learning management, and succession planning (ADP)
  • 37% of employees say “working with a great team” is their primary reason for staying (Gusto)
  • 54% of employees say a strong sense of community (great coworkers, celebrating milestones, a common mission) kept them at a company longer than was in their best interest (Gusto)
  • 55% of employees have put off job hunting because they didn’t want to leave their co-workers (ICIMS)
  • 64% of workers say their supervisors don’t give them enough support (Mental Health America)

  • 59% of employees felt that their superiors view profits or revenues as more important than how people are treated (Randstad)

  • 48% of workers without supervisor support have the incentive to perform their best work vs 88% of workers who have their boss’s support (APA)

  • 39% of workers without their supervisor’s support experience job satisfaction vs 86% who have their boss’s support (APA)

  • 22% of workers without their supervisor’s support described their organization as a good place to work vs 79% who do have their boss’s support (APA)

  • A lack of supervisor support created distrust among workers (56%) for their employers (APA)

  • 77% of employees desire relocating to a different city, state or country as a career move (Cornerstone)
  • 15% of employees say their employer offers relocation opportunities (Cornerstone)
  • 76% of Professionals ages 18-34 are more likely to relocate vs. 62% of those ages 35-54 and 40% age 55+ (Robert Half)

  • 44% of employees cited better pay and perks as the top considerations in their decision to relocate, followed by family or personal reasons (17%), cost of living (16%) and career advancement (16%) (Robert Half)

  • 84% of Millennials are willing to relocate for a job (Graebel)
  • 82% of Millennials believe they will be required to relocate if they want to advance their careers (Graebel)
  • 80% of Millennials would be willing to take a pay cut if necessary to relocate to a dream destination (Graebel)
  • 57% of tech workers said they’ve previously moved for a new job and 80% have thought about moving for a job at some point (Indeed)

  • 60% of men and 53% of women have moved for a job (Indeed)

  • Reasons workers move for a job include better career opportunities (65%), desire for a change (44%) or fresh start (40%) and lower costs of living in other locations (33%) (Indeed)

  • 62% of workers would relocate for a job opportunity (Robert Half)

  • 79% of workers say they don’t earn their desired salary, with 36% saying they don’t earn anywhere near it and 58% say they don’t think they are better off financially than their parents (CareerBuilder)

  •  62% of those in health care/social assistance are concerned with salary and total compensation (Modis)

  • 8% of workers have current salaries of $100,000 or more and 21% say they feel they need to earn $100,000 or more to be successful (CareerBuilder)

  • 71% of workers have accepted a job when they knew their skill set and experience were worth more than what they were getting paid (CareerBuilder)

  • Saving for retirement, paying for children’s education and handling basic living expenses are negatively impacting the workplace through stress (79%), lack of focus at work (64%), physical health issues (36%) and absenteeism (34%) (IFEBP)

  • 63% of workers said they were “well” vs. “unwell” on the job, and 87% said they were satisfied with their jobs (Fidelity)

  • 42% of employees said they were “unwell” when it came to money and cited finances as a major stressor (Fidelity)

  • 98% of employees are affected by stress related to work or money (Fidelity)

  • 47% of workers said stress came from their job and 35% said it came from the need to save money (Fidelity)

  • 98% of employees reported feeling stressed in the past three months, with job and finances topping the list of biggest stress points for employees (Fidelity)

  • 77% of employees were considered well when it comes to their overall wellbeing, and 68% were unwell in at least one of the four domains of wellbeing (financial, health, work and life) (Fidelity)

  • 47% of employees reported high levels of stress caused by their job, saving for the future (34%), and paying off debt (33%) (Fidelity)

  • Workers with the highest amount of debt had twice the absenteeism as those with the lowest amount of debt (Fidelity)

  • One in three workers says that a personal money problem distracts them from their work and results in health problems (CFSI)

  • 55% of employees believe their employer cares about their financial well-being (PwC)

  • 62% of Millennials are more likely to say that their loyalty to their company is influenced by how much the company cares about their financial well-being as compared to Gen X (50%) and baby boomers (36%) (PwC)

  • 72% of millennials and 71% of Gen X are more likely to be attracted to another company that cares more about their financial well-being than baby boomers (45%) (PwC)

  • 81% of employers believe their well-being initiatives meet their employees’ needs, while only 66% of employees agree (WTW)

  • 80% of employers expect to improve employee wellbeing programs over the next three years, while half expect to upgrade technology for both administering and using benefits (WTW)

  • 66% of employers plan to increase their support for financial well-being, compared to the current level of 16% (WTW)

  • 76% of millennials, 68% of gen x and 57% of baby boomers say they’ve used the services their employer provides to assist them with their personal finances (PwC)

  • 44% of employees say their employer financial wellness program has helped them get their spending under control, better manage healthcare expenses/save for future healthcare expenses (13%), better manage investments (26%), prepare for retirement (44%), save more for major goals (35%) and pay off debt (33%) (PwC)

  • 78% of workers with student loan debt, including 65% of workers over age 55 with current or future loan debt, want their workplace to offer student loan benefits (CommonBond)

  • A third of workers say they worry about finances at work, with most citing debt as their main concern (EBRI)

  • Less than 40% of workers believed that counseling for student loan debt could be beneficial; younger workers were more likely to perceive this program, along with budgeting and debt counseling, as useful (EBRI)

  • While student loan repayment is the most requested financial benefit, it’s only third on HR’s list of priority benefits (CommonBond)

  • 75% of HR executives think their benefits offering are innovative, but only 50% of workers agree (CommonBond)

  • 49% of employers hope to improve social well-being, up from the current level of 12% (WTW)

  • 87% of employers say they should be involved in encouraging workers to make healthier lifestyle changes, but only 54% of workers agree (WTW)

  • 35% of workers were satisfied with their financial situation this year vs 48% from two years ago (WTW)

  • 48% of middle-income earners worry about their household’s financial situation at least once a week (Mass Mutual)

  • 37% of employees said they felt “not very” or “not at all” financially secure (Mass Mutual)

  • 59% of employees worry about their future financial state (WTW)

  • 50% of global workers often worry about their future financial state, and two-thirds said they felt their future financial state would be worse off relative to that of their parents’ generation (WTW)

  • 86% of people want to retire at or before 65, but only 37% believe this to be an option (Cebr)

  • 20% of people believe they will never be able to retire due to poor financial planning (Cebr)

  • 66% of workers would like more help from employers in reaching their retirement goals, but only 52% of employers believe that to be the case (TCRS)

  • 70% of employers said they consider their workplace aging-friendly, but only slightly more than half of workers thought their workplace fit that description (TCRS)

  • 50% of employees over 55 and 59% of those ages 18-34 believe their employers should be doing more to guarantee their financial stability in retirement (Cebr)

  • 31% of struggling employees said money concerns were keeping them from doing their best work (WTW)

  • 24% of workers experienced a moderate financial hardship, and 13% experienced a severe financial hardship (WTW)

  • 37% of struggling employees report high stress levels; 33% reported above-average stress levels, and 30% said their health was poor (WTW)

  • Employees without money worries reported themselves as being in good health (35%) or very good health (55%), while only 5% reported high stress levels (WTW)

  • About 30% of employees were identified as “struggling” (WTW)

  • 29% of struggling employees were fully engaged at work (WTW)

  • 81% of struggling employees are living paycheck to paycheck (WTW)

  • 53% of employees would like their employers to offer tools that provide suggestions on how they can improve their financial situation (WTW)

  • 61% of young employees have considered getting a second job to help pay off their student loans (American Student Assistance)
  • 67% of Millennials said their financial stress hinders their focus and productivity at work, compared to 32% of Baby Boomers (Bank of America)
  • 37% of full-time employees think about or deal with financial issues when they’re supposed to be working (Humana)
  • 70% of human resource professionals believe personal financial challenges had a “large or some impact” on employee performance (Humana)
  • 44% of employees believe that their employer cares about their wellbeing (PwC)
  • 86% of recruiters report having recently spoken with underemployed/under-compensated employees (MRI Network)
  • 51% of employees are extremely concerned about job security (MetLife)
  • 91% of workers say they feel motivated to do their best when they have leadership support (American Psychological Association)
  • 89% of workers with leadership support are more likely to recommend company as a good place to work (American Psychological Association)
  • 15% of employees strongly agree that the leadership of their organization makes them enthusiastic about the future (Gallup)
  • 45% of U.S. employees said their senior leaders create trust and confidence (WTW)
  • 81% of employees say their managers treat them respectfully, 75% said managers give them assignments suited to their strengths and skills, and 60% said their managers are clear about explaining assignments and goals (WTW)
  • Employees who say their company provides equal opportunities are 3.8 times more likely to say they are proud to work for their company (Salesforce.com)
  • 56% of workers said managers make fair decisions, and 50% think managers have sufficient time for handling the people-oriented aspects of their jobs (WTW)
  • 68% of men and 66% of women said a manager should always take responsibility for their team’s mistakes (Sharefile)

  • 46% of men and 44% of women said a manager should just be seen as a colleague and not a friend (Sharefile)

  • 53% of men and 50% of women say a manager’s decision on something isn’t final and should be open to challenge (Sharefile)

  • 75% of employers ranked stress as their top health and productivity concern (WTW)
  • 61% of employees are burned out on the job, yet 33% don’t take enough time off to decompress (CareerBuilder)
  • The top five stress symptoms causing missed work days are constant fatigue (29%); sleeplessness (26%); aches and pains (24%); high anxiety (23%) and weight gain (18%) (CareerBuilder)
  • Job-insecure individuals reported work loss days of greater than two weeks, bed-ridden days of greater than two weeks, worsening of general health and greater work-family life imbalance in the past 12 months (Ball State University)
  • 87% of employers reported that employees feel the most stress in regard to their performance (Xerox)
  • More than two-thirds of Americans work while they’re tired (Accountemps)

  • 60% of working parents suffer from burnout as they juggle the responsibilities of work and home (BPI)

  • 86% of all workers, 39% ages 18-34, 54% ages 45-55 and 50% ages 65+ believe burnout is connected to job satisfaction (University of Phoenix)

  • More than half of employees have experienced job burnout (University of Phoenix)

  • 50% of millennials, 40% of Gen X and 35% of boomers say burnout is motivating them to consider changing jobs (Staples)
  • 95% of human resource leaders admit employee burnout is sabotaging workforce retention (Kronos)
  • Unfair compensation (41%), unreasonable workload (32%), and too much overtime / after-hours work (32%) are the top three contributors to employee burnout (Kronos)
  • Nearly 60% of tech workers suffer from on-the-job burnout (Blind)

  • The burnout rate for 25 out of 30 tech companies is 50% or higher (Blind)

  • HR Leaders attribute 20-50% of their annual turnover to burnout (Kronos)

  • HR leaders said the barriers to ridding the workplace of burnout include too many competing priorities (20%), a lack of executive support (14%) and outmoded HR technology (20%) (Kronos)

  • 49% of employees said their stress levels were either above average or high (WTW)

  • Only 26% of employees discuss their issues with their managers, and 25% turn to employer-provided services (WTW)

  • 44% of working adults say that their current job affects their overall health, but only 28% of that group believe the effect is positive (Harvard)
  • 60% of U.S. workers feel stressed all or most of the time at work (Udemy)
  • 51% of employees said they were happier at work during the holiday season, but 35% said they were more stressed at this time of year (Accountemps)

  • 64% of Millennials and Gen Z employees feel stressed all or most of the time at work (Udemy)
  • 52% of full-time employees in the U.S. feel more stressed today than they did a year ago (Udemy)
  • 55% of workers undergoing current or recent change experience chronic stress compared with 22% of workers undergoing no change (APA)
  • 48% of workers say that investing more in professional development is one of the highest-impact strategies to fight stress that their company can do (Udemy)
  • 58% of workers have turned to company-sponsored skills training to deal with stress at work, 42% invest their own money in professional development (Udemy)
  • One-third of workers are not confident in their ability to perform their jobs (Docebo)

  • 32% of workers felt unqualified to do their job, and 33% fear their boss or colleagues agree (Docebo)

  • 52% of workers have a co-worker who isn’t qualified to perform the work he or she is assigned (Docebo)

  • Nearly 25% of workers feel their lack of qualifications could result in their being let go, something workers said worries them at least once a month (Docebo)

  • 33% of Americans say employer-provided training doesn’t meet their expectations (Docebo)

  • One in three workers said their employer’s training is out-of-date (Docebo)

  • In the U.S., 32% of workers said training is critical (Docebo)

  • Employers increased their per-employee spend on training in 2017, up nearly 2% to $1,296 (ATD)

  • Employees averaged over 34 hours of training per year, with technology-based learning accounting for 41% of all time spent learning (ATD)

  • Up to 59% of employees admitted they had no training whatsoever to do their jobs and that their skills had been mostly self-taught (ATD)

  • 32% of retail employees said they don’t receive any formal training (Axonify)

  • 31% of employees were offered no formal training in 2016 (Axonify)

  • 43% of employees who received training found it to be ineffective (Axonify)

  • 93% of employees want training that is easy to complete/understand, 91% want it to be personalized/relevant, and 90% want it to be engaging/fun (Axonify)

  • 89% of employees want training anytime/anywhere they need to do their job, 85% want to be able to choose the training times that fit their schedule, and 80% believe frequent/regular training is more important than formal workplace training (Axonify)

  • 43% of women are satisfied with training and learning opportunities at their employer vs. 55% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • 59% of fashion professionals say they are satisfied with opportunities for training and development, while 57% are satisfied with the levels of transparency around career progression within the company (BoF)

  • 90% of employers agreed that it is beneficial to switch from paper-based training to mobile-based training (Inkling and Forrester)

  • More than 85% of employers say employees who have used mobile devices and software or apps specifically designed to train customer-facing employees are better able to meet customer expectations after learning to use such tools (Inkling and Forrester)

  • 16% of employees say that their current job has a negative impact on their health (NPR)
  • 64% of American workers think their workplace has a negative effect on their well-being (Thomsons Online Benefits)

  • 52% of workers agree with the statement, “our internal office culture creates a lot of barriers to executing good ideas.” (American Express)
  • 36% of workers are satisfied with the amount of on-the-job stress in their jobs (Gallup)
  • 54% of employees are reporting high stress levels (Aon Hewitt)
  • 37% of employees say their stress levels are higher than the previous year (Aon Hewitt)
  • 64% of employees say their workplace and longer hours have contributed to stress (Staples)
  • 33% of employees say they typically feel tense or stressed out during the workday (American Psychological Association)
  • 35% of employees report receiving sufficient resources from their employers to help manage stress (American Psychological Association)
  • 48% of younger millennials (ages 26 to 30) said they felt they were fairly paid, compared with 50% of older millennials (ages 31-35) and 54% of Gen Z (ages 18-25) (Comparably)

  • When asked what their top priority would be if they became boss, 27% of Gen Z said they would increase employee pay while 35% of Gen Z and 32% of Millennials said they were likely share pay information with coworkers (Comparably)

  • 29% of employees chose to leave jobs because of "low pay” (Express Employment Professionals)
  • 31% of U.S. employees don’t believe their employers pay fairly when factoring in age or race, and 48% believe men are paid more than women (Begom)

  • 49% of professionals feel they are paid fairly at their jobs (Robert Half)

  • 46% of professionals feel they are underpaid at their jobs (Robert Half)

  • 5% of professionals feel they are overpaid at their jobs (Robert Half)

  • 49% of women were more apt to feel underpaid compared to men (44%) (Robert Half)

  • Employees with a bachelors degree or higher, as well as those earning more than $100,000 per year were most likely to say they’re being paid fairly (50% and 57%) (Robert Half)

  • 67% of managers think employees are fairly paid, while only 21% of employees think their pay is adequate (PayScale)

  • 17% of people cited flexible hours, 10% a need for freedom and 8% higher compensation as reasons they would leave a traditional job to do freelance work (ReportLinker)
  • 65% of millennials said "they did not make enough money to cover expenses or are living paycheck to paycheck" (Ernst & Young)
  • Women who strongly agree they have a best friend at work are more than twice as likely to be engaged (63%) compared with the women who say otherwise (29%) (Gallup)

  • Two out of ten U.S. employees strongly agree they have a best friend at work. By moving this ratio to six in ten, organizations could realize 36% fewer safety incidents, 7% more engaged customers and 12% higher profit (Gallup)

  • 35% of workers call in “sick” just to take a mental health day (American Express)
  • 10% of Gen Z and 9% of Millennials say that stress accumulated during work hours affects their personal life to a great extent (Stanford University)

  • 23%, of employees feel “high” or “overwhelming” financial stress (Financial Finesse)
  • 57% of workers report they are very or somewhat stressed about their financial situation (Prudential)

  • 70% of workers stress about their health, jobs and finances, and more than 20% spend at least five hours each week thinking about these stressors during their working hours (Colonial Life)

  • 50% of workers said they lose between one and five hours of work time each week due to stress (Colonial Life)

  • When workers are stressed, 41% feel less productive, 33% feel less engaged, 15% said stress made them look for a new job and 14% said it made them absent more frequently (Colonial Life)

  • 94% of workers report feeling stress at work, and almost a third say their stress level is high to unusually high (Wrike)

  • 63% of senior marketers say their job is somewhat stressful, 27% say it is somewhat stressful, 7% say it is very stressful, 3% say it isn't stressful at all (The Creative Group)
  • 32% of senior marketers say the the more stressful the situation, the more productive they are; 60% say a little bit of stress motivates them but too much impedes their productivity; 8% say they are less productive with any level of stress (The Creative Group)
  • The average tenure for CMOs at major consumer brands is 42 months (Spencer Stuart)
  • 52% of women and 50% of men view greater job stability and security as "very important" in a new job (Gallup)
  • 51% of job seekers rate greater stability and job security as "very important" in a new role (Gallup)
  • 19% of US workers worry about being laid off (Gallup)
  • Between economic mobility or financial stability, an overwhelming 92% of workers say they want stability (Pew Charitable Trusts)
  • 39% of employees are concerned about their position being automated or made obsolete in the next five years (Jobvite)
  • 77% of employees thought there were threats to their current job like new management (20%), toxic boss or working environment (19%), layoffs (17%), recession (16%) and younger coworkers (15%) (Monster)

  • 40% of millennials see automation as a threat to their jobs (Deloitte)
  • 53% of Millennials see their workplace becoming less human as a result of automation (Deloitte)
  • 36% of millennials and 42% of Gen Z reported their employers were helping them understand and prepare for the changes with Industry 4.0 (Deloitte)

  • 70% of U.S. workers are putting in more than 40 hours a week (Staples)
  • 58% of Generation Zers said they would come into work on evenings and weekends in exchange for a bigger paycheck, compared with 45% of millennials, 40% of Gen X, and 33% of boomers (Monster)
  • 24% of Gen Xers say the desire for financial stability motivates them to stay in a job (Purchasing Power)

  • If offered financial programs at work, 89% of Gen Xers would participate in them (Purchasing Power)

  • 55% of Baby Boomers say that they are willing to work longer hours than other generations (Korn Ferry)
  • 62% of employees are concerned that the Trump administration will negatively affect their work-life balance (Paychex)
  • 68% of employees say they are neither more nor less worried since the 2016 election, 18% are less worried, 12% are more worried about how they are treated in their workplace because of their race, ethnicity, gender, immigration status, sexual orientation or other personal characteristics (Gallup)
  • 26% of employees say they feel stress or tension due to the political discourse happening at the office, up from 17% that said the same last September (American Psychological Association)
  • 40% of workers say that they’ve had a negative outcome at work as a result of political talk at work (American Psychological Association)
  • 53% of employees would not feel confident discussing family-related issues with their employer (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 23% of workers have reduced their working hours to try and get a better fit between work and family life vs. 14% who work flexibly on an informal basis to achieve this (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • More than one-third of employees who have called in sick agreed that their work situation keeps them from being happy in other areas of their lives, and 40% of those who called in sick said they don’t trust their senior leaders (O.C. Tanner)

  • Workers who are finding balance between their jobs and personal lives are twice as happy, more productive and show greater loyalty to their employers than those struggling to find balance (Robert Half)

  • Professionals in Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Francisco scored highest in achieving work-life balance while Nashville, Denver, Atlanta, Cincinnati, San Diego and Raleigh scored the lowest (Robert Half)

  • 39% of employees said employers were responsible for creating work-life balance (Robert Half)

  • 26% of business leaders cited work-life balance as an employee concern (Robert Half)

  • 45% of employees said they are very or extremely satisfied with their work-life balance (Spherion)

  • 74% of men and 79% of women said they have a good work/life balance (Sharefile)

  • 31% of workers are effectively prevented from working flexibly, and 35% who do work flexibly state that their work-life balance is not ideal for them or their family (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 11% of workers have refused a new job due to a lack of good work-life balance opportunities, while around 75% of workers would carefully consider their childcare arrangements before taking a promotion or new job (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 44% of workers feel that flexible working is a genuine work-life balance option for parents in their workplace; however, 34% of workers have faked being ill in order to meet family obligations (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • Around 47% of workers believe that work affects their ability to spend time with family, and 72% of workers bring work home in the evenings or at weekends (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 34% of workers feel resentful towards their employer with regards to work-life balance; this increases to 46% for male millennial workers (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 53% of workers cite work as the main cause for being burned out, compared to 12% who blame family life (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 41% of millennial workers intend to downshift into a less stressful job to gain a better fit between work and family life (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 36% of millennial workers plan to take a pay cut to work fewer hours (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 82% of U.S. workers say the ability to work from anywhere at any time allows them to maintain a healthy work/life balance, 62% still prefer to work in the office (Randstad)

  • 65% of workers ages 18-24 say they prefer working in a traditional office environment (Randstad)

  • 66% of workers say they like the option of occasionally working from home or another location, but aren’t able to do so (Randstad)

  • 36% of workers report their workplaces support working from home anytime and anywhere they want (Randstad)

  • 35% of employees disagree that their employers provide the necessary technical equipment to enable them to work from home (Randstad)

  • 30% of workers say they regularly have online or virtual team meetings via video conferencing (Randstad)

  • 80% of workers say they like agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) because it increases their productivity, creativity and job satisfaction (Randstad)

  • 61% of workers don’t believe agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) interferes with their personal lives, or their ability to disconnect from work (Randstad)

  • 37% of workers think employers should make efforts to change organizational culture to ensure a good work-life balance, 35% believe more policies that support work-life balance should be implemented and 28% feel that employers should encourage their staff to use existing policies to help their work-life balance (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 52% of employees said their work/life balance has improved from 3 years ago (Robert Half)
  • 45% of professionals feel their company does not promote a healthy work/life balance (Execu│Search)

  • 40% of employers that made the switch from vacation and sick time to PTO reported that employees were more present (WorldatWork)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 70% say they’re driven to contribute to their organization’s success, as opposed to the 55% who don’t regularly take a week of vacation (O.C. Tanner)

  • A third of workers feel the greatest sense of belonging in the workplace, vs. 62% who feel that in their home (EY)

  • Almost 40% of employees said they have the greatest sense of belonging when colleagues regularly check to see how they’re doing, both personally and professionally (EY)

  • 61% of female workers said they believe exclusion is a form of workplace bullying, vs. 53% of males (EY)

  • More than 40% of employees from all generations said social exclusion at work makes them feel emotionally and physically isolated, stressed, angry and sad (EY)

  • When workers feel like they belong, they’re more motivated, engaged, productive and 3.5 times more likely to contribute fully and innovatively to reach their potential (EY)

  • A little more than a third of traditional workers felt a sense of belonging in the workplace along with 32% of contingent (temporary or on-call) workers and 52% of independent (contractors or online platform workers) workers (Gallup)

  • Among employees who take a week or more of vacation, 63% say they have a sense of belonging at their company, compared to 43% who skip at least a week of vacation time (O.C. Tanner)

  • 40% of workers said they felt they couldn’t get ahead if they asked their managers for time off (U of M & Cal State U)

  • 74% of working adults say their manager does encourage them to take time off when they need to take care of their health and wellness (Glassdoor)

  • 87% of employees expect their employer to support them in balancing their life between work and personal commitments (Glassdoor)

  • 91% of employees say their manager is very or somewhat supportive of their efforts to achieve work/life balance; 74% said their boss sets a good or excellent example (Robert Half)
  • 25% of workers said work-life balance is the most important aspect of how their company connects with them (Speakap)

  • 53% of employees say a role that allows them to have greater work-life balance and better personal well-being is "very important" to them (Gallup)
  • 57% of Millennials say that work-life balance and well-being in a job are "very important" to them (Gallup)
  • 41% of employees believe work-life balance is impossible to achieve (Randstad)
  • 23% of people cited better work-life balance as a reason they would leave a traditional job to do freelance work (ReportLinker)

  • 14% of professionals said they resent their employer for their treatment of vacation time (Office Pulse)

  • 34% of parents felt resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance, with more fathers than mothers expressing this sentiment (37% vs. 32%) (Working Families)

  • 46% of millennial fathers feel resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance (Working Families)

  • 37% of parents said that changing company culture to make work-life balance more acceptable should be a priority for employers (Working Families)

  • 36% of parents are willing to take a pay cut, while 41% of millennial parents intended to downshift to a less stressful job (Working Families)

  • 81% of parents who said they worked flexibly said they still had to bring work home at evenings or weekends (Working Families)

  • 63% of employees said flexible work hours were nice to have (Hays)

  • 4% of employees said flexible work was not important to them (Hays)

  • 71% of workers say the ability to provide for themselves and their families is what motivates them to do their job, followed by money (63%), and the ability to make a difference (38%) (CareerBuilder)

  • Slightly more than half of employees feel they make an impact on overall business goals (Ceridian)

  • 5% of employees don’t think their contributions make any kind of difference, while 44% do not understand their impact or are unaware of business goals (Ceridian)

  • 93% of employees said trust in their direct manager is important to remain satisfied at work (Ultimate Software)
  • More than 50% of workers said they can’t perform their best if they aren’t satisfied at work, and another half said they would turn down a 10% wage increase to remain with a great manager (Ultimate Software)

  • 35% of employees do not trust senior leadership at their organization (OC Tanner)
  • 45% of U.S. workers are dissatisfied with senior management's way of communicating with them;  62% said they preferred face-to-face updates from the CEO (Kollective)
  • 65% of employees say respectful treatment of all employees at all levels is a very important contributor to their job satisfaction (SHRM)
  • 61% of employees say trust between them and their senior management is very important to job satisfaction; only 33% are very satisfied with the level of trust in their organizations (SHRM)
  • 83% of employees experienced a more positive work environment when they felt there was trust in their managers/organization (IBM)
  • 39% of females say their company treats people fairly, compared to 47% of men (Lean In)

  • 83% of employees think that having a clear employee value proposition is important (Alight Solutions)

  • 40% of employees age 24 and younger said they’d talk to their boss about making a career change if they had access to additional opportunities to learn and grow within the workplace (LinkedIn)

  • 14% of employees said they would like more training or learning opportunities to improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 78% of employees expect managers to talk with them about career and learning opportunities, and only 37% agree that managers do that well (Alight Solutions)

  • 9.3% of employees received a promotion in the past year (WorldatWork)
  • 53% of workers believe playing office politics and feigning interest in a supervisor’s “dumb story” (43%) will help them get promoted (Bridge)

  • 54% of Boomers said that the “opportunity to make an impact on the business” was the best way to retain them (Korn Ferry)
  • 33% of employees believe they make a major impact on their employer’s business performance (LinkedIn)

  • 40% of workers give their companies a negative rating on how well they help their employees advance their careers (CNBC)

  • 50% of job seekers say that their most recent employer has helped them advance in their career (Future Workplace)
  • Companies with more than 1,000 employees are 25% more likely to use software to measure employee engagement (Pomello)
  • 31.3% of employees who considered themselves engaged said their employer could do more to improve the employee experience (Achievers)

  • 77% of employees agree a strong culture allows them to do their best work, 76% see the impact in productivity and efficiency, and another 74% draw a correlation between culture and their ability to serve their customer base (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • Only about 25% of employees said their organization has a strong culture based on core values and a similar amount said they trust their leadership at the executive level (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • 9% of employees said leadership is very committed to improving company culture and employee experience (Achievers)

  • 38% of employees have either never heard senior leadership talk about culture or they talk about it, but there’s no action to back it up, 31.4% call senior leadership average – they are reactive but not proactive (Achievers)

  • 10.8% of workers call their manager/employer awesome and are recognized weekly and 29.4% call them pretty good and are recognized at least once a month (Achievers)

  • 16.3% of employees said their manager was horrible at soliciting feedback on their employee experience and 40% rated them okay – they ask for feedback only once or twice a year (Achievers)

  • When it came to acting on feedback, workers ranked managers/employers even worse – 42.3% said they’re okay – they make a few changes based on it but 21.4% said they never do anything with feedback (Achievers)

  • 57% of workers ranked opportunities to learn and grow as one of the most important aspects of workplace culture (Udemy)
  • 61% of employees acknowledge they would rather work when they feel sick than use their paid time off or sick time (Glassdoor)

  • 88% of employees said company culture was at least relatively important (Jobvite)
  • 75% of employees reported they’re more likely to stay with their employer because of their benefit program (WTW)
  • 23% of adults prefer a male boss, which is 10 percentage points lower than the last reading in 2014 and 43 points lower than the initial 1953 reading (Gallup)

  • 56% of employers say they are unable to actively manage culture because they lack leadership support; 45% say they don’t have enough time or resources (CultureIQ)
  • The most popular methods to actively manage company culture and drive employee engagement: drafting employee engagement surveys (55%), creating culture committees and events (29%) and offering employee resource groups (20%) (CultureIQ)
  • 73% of employers believe a great corporate culture gives their organizations a competitive edge (CultureIQ)
  • 49% of employees say culture influences their employee experience more than the physical environment (22%) or the technology they use to do their jobs (29%) (YouEarnedIt)
  • More than 75% of HR leaders feel their current HR technology solution is improving the overall employee experience (Paychex)

  • 52% of HR pros cite management buy-in as the biggest barrier to strengthening culture (CultureIQ)
  • 42% of employees feel that executive leadership does not contribute to a positive company culture (Execu-Search)
  • 80% of businesses plan to improve their corporate culture in 2017 (Virgin Pulse)
  • 35% of Millennials say strong leadership defines a good work culture (Staples)
  • On average, employees believe work is half as meaningful as it could be (Betterup)

  • 90% of employees would forgo 23% of their earnings – an average of $21,000 a year – for more meaningful work (Betterup)

  • Employees with meaningful work stay on the job 7.4 months longer than other employees, put in an extra hour a week and take two fewer paid leave days a year (Betterup)

  • 57% of employees said "meaningful work" contributes most toward a positive workplace sentiment (Namely)
  • 19% of employees worldwide see a strong alignment between their company ‘s public perception and their own work experience (Weber Shandwick)

  • Meaningful work is the single largest contributor to a positive employee experience (27%) (Globoforce)

  • 70% of workers think their companies should address societal problems, up from 63% in 2017 (MetLife)

  • 52% of workers expect their employer to solve problems, an increase from last year’s 41% (MetLife)

  • 85% of workers said good corporate citizenship is important where they work (MetLife)

  • 76% of workers want their employers to make a difference in their community and 72% in the world (MetLife)

  • Among employees whose companies reflect their values, 85% described themselves as loyal and 54% said they’re willing to go well beyond their work’s scope, compared to 44% and 4% of those whose values and work aren’t aligned (MetLife)

  • 93% of workers said trustworthy leadership was the most critical factor in creating alignment, with 93% saying it’s important but just 61% feeling their companies are aligned with their values (MetLife)

  • Almost 70% of employees said their companies occasionally struggle in aligning with, being sensitive about and adhering to local laws, practices and cultures (Globalization Partners)

  • 48% of millennials believe businesses behave ethically compared with 65% in 2017 (Deloitte)

  • 45% of millennials believe business has a positive impact on society, down from 72% in 2017 (Deloitte)

  • 47% of millennials believe that business leaders are committed to helping improve society compared with 62% in 2017 (Deloitte)

  • 44% of millennials believe business leaders are making a positive impact and still have some faith in business’ ability to enact meaningful change in society (Deloitte)

  • 75% of millennials believe multinational corporations have the potential to help solve society’s economic, environmental and social challenges (Deloitte)

  • 47% of employees said they value a workspace with a community atmosphere, especially for millennials ages 18-34(55%) (Clutch)

  • 61% of employees want appealing and comfortable workspaces, workplace flexibility (53%), perks (47%) and workspaces that provide learning opportunities (32%) (Clutch)

  • 48% of office workers said peer collaboration is their preferred method of learning in the workplace and 81% said that peer collaboration helped improve their productivity (Braidio)

  • Millennials top three work-related fears: getting stuck with no development opportunities, not being able to realize their career goals, and not finding a job that matches their personality (Universum)
  • 87% of millennials say professional development or career growth opportunities are very important (Gallup)
  • 59% of millennials; 44% of Gen Xers and 41% of baby boomers say opportunities to learn and grow are extremely important to them when applying for a job (Gallup)
  • 87% of millennials rate "professional or career growth and development opportunities" as important to them in a job; 69% of non-millennials agree (Gallup)
  • 33% of employees said their boss negatively impacts their company's culture (Comparably)
  • 39% of employees said being a micromanager was the worse trait a boss could have, followed by bosses who are overly critical (22%), disorganized (16%), know-it-all (14%) and impatient (9%) (Comparably)

  • Women said that being overly critical (28%) was nearly as bad as micromanaging (32%) (Comparably)

  • 17% of men rated overly critical as a negative trait in bosses (Comparably)

  • Micromanaging tied with being overly critical (30%) among tech designers as the worst trait for a boss to have (Comparably)

  • 39% of women feel their bosses hurt company culture, compared to 31% of men (Comparably)
  • 44% of workers have left a job because of a bad boss (Bamboo HR)
  • 27% of workers age 18 to 25 feel negatively about their bosses, compared to 38% of  workers aged 56 to 60 (Comparably)
  • 31% of female employees said they left due to “inappropriate” behavior by a boss, 20% of the men said the same (Bamboo HR)
  • 61% of workers are satisfied with their boss or immediate supervisor (Gallup)
  • 1 in 5 employees would prefer to receive a promotion (higher title included) without a 3% raise, rather than getting that raise without a promotion (BambooHR)
  • 72% of men and 55% of women said they’re receptive to a promotion without a pay increase (OfficeTeam)

  • 72% of workers ages 18-34 said they’ll take a new title without a pay hike, compared to 61% of workers ages 35-54 and 53% of those 55+ (OfficeTeam)

  • Nearly one-third of employees would rather be recognized in a company-wide email from an executive than receive a bonus of $500 (BambooHR)
  • Workers that were recognized in the last month are 29% more likely to agree that “The work we do at my organization has meaning and purpose for me” (Globoforce)

  • 45% of workers have not been recognized in six months or more, and 16% have never been recognized at work (Globoforce)

  • When asked to what extent organizations should go to recognize workers’ achievements, 49% said “very” to “extremely” while 38% said “somewhat” and only 12% said “not at all” (IBM)

  • 64% of workers are nearly twice as likely to agree their company is a good place to work when they are satisfied with how life events, such as getting married, buying a house or having a child, are celebrated in the office, compared with 35% who are dissatisfied with how those events are celebrated (Globoforce)

  • 93% of workers, at companies with recognition programs tied to core values, agree the work they do has meaning and purpose (Globoforce)

  • At companies with no formal recognition program, only 81% of workers agree the work they do has meaning and purpose (Globoforce)

  • 60% of workers would like to see their colleagues’ good work praised more frequently by managers and leaders (Reward Gateway)
  • 84% of employees say praise should be given on a continual, year-round basis (Reward Gateway)
  • 88% of employees agree it’s important that employers reward employees for great work (AttaCoin)
  • 41% of employees say their employer effectively rewards employees for great work (AttaCoin)
  • 90% of employees who work in places with effective rewards programs agreed with the statement “My work makes a difference” (AttaCoin)
  • 47% of employees want to receive rewards spontaneously (Xexec)

  • 38% of employees want to receive rewards in exchange for good work (Xexec)

  • 52% of employees would rather celebrate rewards with their families than with colleagues (Xexec)

  • 52% of employees agree that they “would rather be recognized privately by my manager than publicly in front of my team” (AttaCoin)
  • 30% more of the workforce is satisfied when there’s even an informal recognition program in place (BambooHR)
  • 75% of employees receiving at least monthly recognition (even if informal) are satisfied with their job (BambooHR)
  • 60% of organizations had a values-based recognition program in 2016 (Globoforce)
  • 50% of employers see their employee recognition programs as an investment in their workforce (WorldAtWork)
  • 89% of companies have recognition programs (WorldAtWork)
  • The common reasons cited for not having a recognition program are senior management's lack of support (28%) and the cost (26%) (WorldAtWork)
  • 60% of companies fund at least four to six different types of recognition programs (Maritz Motivation)
  • 13% of respondents do not use a technology platform to support their employee recognition programs (Maritz Motivation)
  • 42% of employees believe their accomplishments go unnoticed (OC Tanner)
  • 52% of companies currently have a comprehensive recognition program (Michael C. Fina)
  • 73% of companies said they plan to make changes to their recognition program over the next year (Michael C. Fina)
  • 67% said they do not integrate employee recognition with onboarding activities (Michael C. Fina)
  • 25% of companies do not incorporate any form of social recognition as part of their employee approach (Maritz Motivation)
  • 38.5% of companies indicate the investment in employee recognition programs represents between .01% and .5% of total payroll; 25% invest between.01% and .25% of total payroll; those in the “very effective” category invest .76% or more of total payroll (Maritz Motivation)
  • Top steps organizations are planning to retain talent: new career development opportunities (61%), market pay adjustments (37%), more non-cash recognition (24%) (Xerox)
  • 67% of employees believe their company’s broken processes prevent them from maximizing their potential (Nintex)

  • 42% of full-time employees believe their growth potential is limited at their current job, no longer believe in the company’s mission, have inflexible schedules, or don’t get along with their coworkers (ICIMS)
  • 14% of employees strongly believe their companies are helping employees reach their full potential (Lifeworks)
  • 63% of employees feel like their employer invests in their future (Lifeworks)
  • 72% of employees don't think management cares about their career growth (Monster)
  • Professionals admit they’re bored at work for about 10.5 hours a week (OfficeTeam)

  • 28% of senior managers think employees are bored because they don’t feel challenged by their work (OfficeTeam)

  • More than half of HR professionals reported being challenged by making sure workers and supervisors have the skills needed now and in the future, and about the same amount of people have been challenged by increasing employee engagement, morale and satisfaction (49%) and retaining employees (40%) (XpertHR)

  • 47% of HR professionals found managing performance and providing professional development opportunities challenging; 43% found aligning talent retention strategy with business objectives challenging; and 40% said that handling employee mergers and acquisitions was challenging (XpertHR)

  • 80% of employees want to acquire more digital skills to guarantee their future employability (Randstad)

  • 76% of employees think their employers should provide them with more training in digital skills, but only 44% said their employers are doing so (Randstad)

  • 25% (up from 16% in spring of last year) of leaders perceive that existing employees have the digital talent to execute their company’s digital strategy (Deloitte)

  • 59% of employees are, to a certain extent, investing in their own upskilling (Randstad)

  • 40% of workers said their employers were helping them develop skills (Gartner)
  • 80% of workers said upskilling was their own responsibility (Randstad)

  • 23% of employees say job does not take full advantage of their skills, training (Gallup)
  • 61% of workers said their employers are providing upskilling opportunities in the technical and soft skills of the future, only 50% said their employers provide career development opportunities that meet their needs and chances for advancement (APA)

  • 49% of employees say their company understands their unique interests and skills (Mercer)
  • 81% of employees are happier at work when they agree that their jobs effectively make use of their skills/abilities (IBM)
  • 40% of employees believe their manager is helping them develop the skills they need to perform their work (Gartner)

  • 59% of employees said that access to projects to help keep their skills up-to-date would keep them satisfied at their current company (Execu-Search)
  • 76% of millennials think professional development opportunities are one of the most important elements of company culture (Execu-Search)
  • 46% of employees do not think their leadership skills are being developed (Execu│Search)

  • 25% of women talk with their managers about developing leadership skills (Right Management)
  • 28% of employees said their employers offer mentorship or leadership programs geared toward women (Randstad)

  • 39% of HR pros evaluate recognition programs with employee surveys; 35% do not measure their employee recognition programs (Michael C. Fina)
  • 44% of workers believe they are always or often overlooked (Mental Health America)
  • 44% of workers felt skilled employees were unrecognized for their work (Mental Health America)

  • 38% of millennials would like to see the recognition program at their current employer improved (Aon Hewitt)
  • When asked which recognition initiative has the biggest impact on employee engagement, HR pros cited: performance awards (33%), anniversary awards (20%), personal notes (10%) (Michael C. Fina)
  • According to employees, the most memorable recognition comes from an employee's manager (28%), high-level leader or CEO (24%), the manager's manager (12%), a customer (10%) and peers (9%) (Gallup)
  • 89% of HR Leaders surveyed agree ongoing peer feedback and check-ins have a positive impact on their organizations (Globoforce)

  • More than 70% of employees in tech do not trust HR (Blind)

  • 26% of employees said they do trust HR and another 4% said their companies have no HR department (Blind)

  • 42% of employees wouldn’t feel comfortable reporting cases of sexual harassment to HR and 41% have witnessed retaliation (Blind)

  • Almost two-thirds of managers wish they had a better way to collect feedback from their team and peers (Betterworks)

  • 35% of managers think HR supports them well (Betterworks)

  • 51% of workers are satisfied with the recognition they receive at work (Gallup)
  • 55% of retail managers say the head office rarely or never recognizes hourly employees for doing good work (WorkJam)
  • Salaried workers (55%) are more satisfied with recognition for accomplishments at work than hourly workers (46%) (Gallup)

  • Workers who describe their employer as a mobile pioneer have productivity rates 16% higher than those described as low on mobile tech support (EIU)

  • Employee satisfaction (23%), creativity (18%), and loyalty (21%) rates are higher in workers who describe their employer as a mobile pioneer (EIU)

  • Mobile enablement pioneer organizations that give employees the ability to work anywhere anytime are more productive (49%) and satisfied (38%) (EIU)

  • Mobile enablement pioneer organizations that give employees the ability to effectively collaborate are more productive (21%) and satisfied (30%) (EIU)

  • Mobile enablement pioneer organizations that give employees quick and easy access to information are more productive (42%) and satisfied (31%) (EIU)

  • Mobile enablement pioneer organizations that give employees workplace flexibility are more productive (14%) and satisfied (27%) (EIU)

  • 29% of hourly and 41% of salaried workers are completely satisfied with pay (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (65%) are more satisfied than hourly workers (50%) with vacation time (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (48%) are more satisfied than hourly workers (34%) with their retirement benefits (Gallup)

  • Salaried workers (45%) are more satisfied with opportunities for promotion than hourly workers (35%) (Gallup)

  • 58% of employees (62% of Millennials and GenX) say that professional development contributes to their job satisfaction (CompTIA)
  • 12% of employees feel their employers aid them in their career development (Bridge)
  • 78% of Gen X believes that performance reviews do not provide them with meaningful growth opportunities (Bridge)

  • 94% of executives remain confident in their current review processes, but 61% of employees feel the traditional performance review is outdated (Reflektive)

  • Employees feel the traditional performance review is too generic (22%), too infrequent (6%) and frequently incomplete (62%) (Reflektive)

  • Almost 70% of employers still use the annual or bi-annual performance review system; more than half of the employees surveyed want reviews at least once a month (Reflektive)

  • 94% of employees prefer that managers address performance issues and development opportunities in real-time (Reflektive)

  • 68% of executives said they found out about employees’ issues or concerns for the first time during performance evaluations (Reflektive)

  • 86% of executives said they think their organization would benefit from checking in with employees more often (Reflektive)

  • Nearly 50% of employees said they don’t feel comfortable raising issues with their managers between formal reviews, but that they would be more proactive about doing so (75%) if managers gave them more frequent feedback (Reflektive)

  • 67% of managers admit they removed negative feedback from evaluations because so much time had gone by and the feedback was no longer relevant (Reflektive)

  • 14% of employees strongly agree that the performance reviews they receive inspire them to improve (Gallup)

  • 61% of Millennials say they would switch to a company with no performance reviews (Adobe)
  • 97% of employees think that data improves their job performance (Qlik)

  • 74% of employees believe their employers would value them more if their data literacy improved (Qlik)

  • 75% of U.S. workers care about how well their company is performing but don’t know enough about the true state of business affairs (Kimble Applications)

  • 84% of workers want their employer to take a stand on regulations, legislation and presidential executive orders that could impact their lives and their employers’ businesses (Glassdoor)

  • Among workers ages 18 to 35, 75% expect employers to take a stand on equal rights, climate change, immigration and constitutional rights (Glassdoor)

  • 67% of 33 to 44 year olds and 49% of those 45 and older favor employer involvement (Glassdoor)

  • 75% of workers expect their employers to donate money to people in need in their own communities or allow workers to volunteer their time (Glassdoor)

  • 42% of employees say learning and development is the most important benefit when deciding where to work followed by health insurance (48%) (Udemy)

  • 34% of employees feel it is the employer’s responsibility to pay for training (Udemy)

  • 42% of millennials said their current employers do provide learning, development and training opportunities (Udemy)

  • 77% of employers plan to make big investments in learning and development programs to provide workers with new skills for new roles as their businesses grow (SunTrust)

  • 28% of Millennials say feeling appreciated contributes to their loyalty (Staples)
  • 53% of employees report feeling appreciated at work (AttaCoin)
  • More than one-third of remote workers prefer to be rewarded with written or oral words of affirmation, as does nearly half of the general employee population (Motivating by Appreciation Inventory)

  • Words of affirmation topped the list of reward preferences for both fully remote workers and onsite staff, followed by quality time (35% and 25%); acts of service (19% and 22%); tangible gifts (7% and 6%) (Motivating by Appreciation Inventory)

  • 73% of tech employees believed their company became a better overall company within the past six months (TINYpulse)
  • More than 50% of workers think employers aren’t preparing workers for future tech jobs (Coding Dojo)

  • 90% of employees think employers are mainly responsible for upskilling staff (Coding Dojo)

  • 57% of employees said they don’t have basic coding skills and 12% said they aren’t tech literate at all and that they struggle with basic applications (Coding Dojo)

  • 61% of current tech workers say they are underpaid (Blind)

  • A little over one-third of tech workers said they were paid fairly and 5% said they were overpaid for their position (Blind)

  • 41% of tech employees feel they are paid unfairly (Blind)

  • 60% of tech workers said their current employer discourages talk about salary between co-workers (Blind)

  • 42% of tech workers say unclear goals stresses them out the most, 16% say bad bosses (Comparably)
  • 88% of full-time American staffers describe themselves as happy at work (Wrike)

  • 71% of workers are mostly happy at work, while 17% are elated (Wrike)

  • Workers with access to collaborative work management software were 85% more likely to identify as happy in the workplace (Wrike)

  • Workers who identified as happy were 55% more likely to rate their company as above average when it comes to diversity (Wrike)

  • Happy employees are three times more likely to attend after-work events and 25% more likely to eat lunch with co-workers (Wrike)

  • Happy employees are 91% more likely to describe their relationship with their manager as being very good (Wrike)

  • 39% of workers would work harder if they are happy in their current role or place of work (One4all)

  • 30% of workers said they would be more willing to work overtime or for longer when they are happy (One4all)

  • 38% of workers say their happiness impacts their performance at work (One4all)

  • 79% of UK workers believe their boss or manager does not care about their happiness, and only 30% would consider leaving their current role if they were unhappy at work (One4all)

  • People who work on an on-call basis were less likely to report feeling happy (University of California – Berkeley & San Francisco)

  • Workers who had more than 2 weeks notice of their schedule had a nearly 75% likelihood of experiencing happiness (University of California – Berkeley & San Francisco)

  • Workers who had two days notice of their schedule or less had a 65% probability of being happy (University of California – Berkeley & San Francisco)

  • As long as workers believe their employer’s rationale for not giving them a raise, 50% had the same level of job satisfaction as employees who received a raise (PayScale)

  • 44% of workers said their employers could improve their happiness by awarding a pay raise of 25%, and 33% said their happiness would improve with a 10% raise (One4all)

  • 21% of UK workers said being thanked by bosses for a job well done more often would increase the morale (One4all)

  • 20% of UK workers said increased recognition from their boss for their work and the contributions they make would make them happier in the workplace (One4all)

  • 36% of IT professionals are happy or very happy at work, 32% unhappy and 31% neutral (AlienVault)
  • 31% of workers believe the employers only care about profits and don't care as much about employees (Businessolver)
  • 35% of employees don’t think their employers care about them as a team member or person  (Rapt Media)
  • 57% of employees feel their leaders are detached from the workforce  (Rapt Media)
  • 28% of employees say personal finances have been a distraction at work (PwC)
  • 33% of workers are distracted by personal financial issues, and 46% of those distracted by financial stress say they spend three or more hours each week dealing with related issues at work (PwC)

  • 40% of LGBT workers said they felt bullied in the workplace – 11% higher than all workers (CareerBuilder)

  • Of LGBT workers who experienced bullying, 41% said it forced them to leave their jobs (CareerBuilder)

  • 56% of LGBT workers bullied said it happened repeatedly, 15% called in sick because they felt bullied, and 72% didn’t report it to HR (CareerBuilder)

  • Black women are paid 38% less than white men and 21% less than white women (Lean In)

  • The disparity in black women’s wages amounts to $800,000 over the course of a career in lost earnings (Lean In)

  • Racism, sexism or both do not affect today’s workplace according to 70% of people who are not black, yet 64% of black women say they’ve faced those forces at some point during their careers (Lean In)

  • Among women who feel supported by male leadership, 54% reported better raises, promotions and assignments (Working Mother)
  • 54% of women found out they were being paid less than a male peer in the same role, compared to 19% of men who learned they were paid less than a colleague (Hire)

  • 21% of young women have been the victim of sexism in the workplace (1000 Dreams Fund)
  • 53% of employees believe unequal pay is the top factor impacting gender inequality, while 49% attribute outdated biases and stereotypes as the second-leading factor (Randstad)

  • 71% of women and 74% of men at companies that don’t address gender inequality said they would look for jobs elsewhere in the next six months (PayScale)
  • 32% of U.S. workers say their employer has taken new steps to prevent and address sexual harassment in the workplace since the “MeToo” movement has started (APA)

  • 10% of employees said their employer added more sexual harassment training or resources since the “MeToo” movement took hold and 8% said their employer adopted a more stringent sexual harassment policy (APA)

  • 7% of employees said their employer held a town hall or all-staff meeting to talk about sexual harassment (APA)

  • 23% of employees admitted to experiencing harassment based on looks, body type or attire, and 22% cited coercion to take on extra hours (Radius)

  • 60% of employees cited co-workers as the most common perpetrators of bad behavior, and just 39% pointed the finger at managers (Radius)

  • 23% of employees said they’d been bullied by an executive, and 20% reported suffering incivility from a subordinate (Radius)

  • 92% of employees said their workplaces are very or somewhat civil (Weber Shandwick & Powell Tate)

  • 48% of employees who reported working in uncivil workplaces said they did not trust leaders to address complaints about incivility (Weber Shandwick & Powell Tate)

  • 11% of workers said they experienced harassment in the last year, and among those, 75% didn’t report it to their managers (SHRM)

  • 43% of women experienced sexual harassment at work (Fairygodboss)

  • 67% of women don’t report incidents for fear of being considered a troublemaker (Fairygodboss)

  • 36.2% of alleged harassers were a direct boss and 57% of harassers were colleagues (Fairygodboss)

  • People who manage others accounted for 25.1% of alleged sexual harassers and clients or vendors made up 11.6% (Fairygodboss)

  • 91% of working parents say that having children living at home affects their interest in finding a new job (FlexJobs)
  • 42% of North American Millennials are in favor of working long hours if it speeds up career progress (Universum)
  • 61% of companies believe mentorships is important to employee happiness (Adecco)
  • 32% of employees say their employer encourages them to work in different departments to gain additional experience and skills (Cornerstone)
  • 32% of workers believe their current skills will prevent them from earning a promotion (Spherion)
  • 45% of Gen Z and millennials want to work in technology (45%), the next highest choice was education (17%) (Future Workplace)
  • 69% of men and 60% of women with disabilities report being generally satisfied with their career paths (Working Mother Research Institute)
  • 49% of American workers will start a new job search after experiencing only two problems with their paycheck (Kronos)
  • Men (29%) are more likely than women (17%) to leave their employer after just one payroll error (Kronos)
  • 30% of working parents will start a new job search after the first payroll error compared with 16% of non-parents (Kronos)
  • 90% of employees in pet friendly workplaces and less than 65% of employees in non-friendly workplaces feel highly connected to their company’s mission, fully engaged with their work and willing to recommend their employer to others (Nationwide)

  • More than three times as many employees at pet friendly workplaces report a positive working relationship with their boss and co-workers (Nationwide)

  • 83% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel their work is rewarding and exciting vs. 46% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 88% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces would recommend their place of employment to others vs. 51% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 91% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces feel the company supports their physical health and wellness and 89% feel the company supports their mental well-being vs. 59% and 53% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 52% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces report a positive working relationship with their supervisor and 53% with their co-workers vs. 14% and 19% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 85% of employees that work in pet friendly workplaces rarely miss a day of work for well-being and/or recuperation vs. 77% of those that don’t work at a pet friendly workplace (Nationwide)

  • 67% of employees say a pet-friendly workplace increases productivity (Banfield)
  • 86% of employees say a pet-friendly workplace helps decrease stress levels (Banfield)
  • 45% of the nation’s workforce believes they’ve gained weight at their present job (CareerBuilder)

  • 26% of all workers said they gained more than 10 pounds at their current job and 11% gained more than 20 pounds (CareerBuilder)

  • Workers believe these factors contribute to weight gain at work:

    • Sitting at a desk most of the day (53%)
    • Too tired from work to exercise (49%)
    • Eating because of stress (41%)
    • No time to exercise before or after work (34%)
    • The temptation of the office candy jar (21%)
    • Eating out regularly (21%)
    • Workplace celebrations (13%)
    • Having to skip meals because of time constraints (12%)
    • Happy hours (6%)
    • Pressure to eat food co-workers bring in (6%) (CareerBuilder)
  • 10% of employees are not sure if their employer offers wellness benefits (CareerBuilder)
  • 61% of workers say their employers do not offer wellness benefits, but if offered, 37% believe they would take advantage of them (CareerBuilder)

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Employee Benefits Statistics

 Miscellaneous Workplace Statistics

These don't necessarily fit into one of the above categories, but they're definitely impactful on employee engagement and as a result, customer engagement. They show a changing workplace, where it's becoming harder to attract top talent while transitioning to the unique millennial culture.

  • 40% to 60% of workers are in declining jobs (Pearson)

  • 25% of Americans are currently in their dream job (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • 41% of employees want to be business owners, but not if they have to work more than 60 hours a week (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • Employees said their dream job destination is California; they prefer a short commute and a 9 to 5 schedule (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • Employees preferred 52 days of paid time off a year, a 38 hour work week and working remotely 11 days a month (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • Male employees said they wanted an average annual salary of $444,958 while women wanted an average annual salary of $278,637 (MidAmerica Nazarene University)

  • 94% of workers want a gift from their employers to make them feel valued, appreciated and happy this Christmas (instantprint)

  • The most in-demand gifts that employees would like to receive from their employers during the holidays include: gift vouchers (29%), an early finish (28.8%), free bar at company Christmas party (20%), a physical gift (10.3%) and a charitable donation made in their name (7%) (instantprint)

  • IT professionals would prefer an early finish this festive period, with 35% in the IT department choosing this as their ideal Christmas gift (instantprint)

  • 52% of employees said that business continues as usual at their offices during the holidays, while 36% said their workplaces are generous and 13% called them stingy (Spherion)

  • 51% of employees said their company collects food, clothing, toys or other items to participate in drives during the holidays (Spherion)

  • Almost a fifth of employees said their companies organize a volunteer activity, and 15% adopt a needy child or family during the holidays (Spherion)

  • Holiday Perks in order of popularity include: a holiday party (36%), extra time off (28%), holiday bonus (26%), office close-down between Christmas and New Year’s Day (22%), an employee gift exchange (18%) and an employer-paid holiday meal (18%) (Spherion)

  • 41% of employees ranked bonuses as their most preferred holiday perk (Spherion)

  • 46% of employees said their employers don’t give out any type of monetary holiday gifts (Spherion)

  • 11% of senior management would like a charitable donation to be made in their name, compared to the average demand for this present of just 7% (instantprint)

  • 33% of women want gift vouchers as the ideal present versus 23% of men (instantprint)

  • 22% of male employees prefer a free bar as the ideal present versus 18% of women (instantprint)

  • One in ten workers are in growing occupations (Pearson)

  • 83% of organizations fail to do exit interviews (Robert Half)

  • 25.8% of employees said their company goes to unreasonable lengths to monitor them (Blind)

  • 12% of workers using messaging apps expressed worry that sensitive data could be exposed by data breaches (Speakap)

  • 62% of C-level executives said their organizations are using new technologies to collect data on their workers, but less than one-third think they’re using the data responsibly (Accenture)

  • More than half of workers said using new sources of workforce data can damage trust, but 92% are open to their company collecting data on their work if it improves their performance or well-being or generates personal benefits (Accenture)

  • Almost two-thirds of employees said recent scandals over the misuse of data has them worried that their employee data will be compromised (Accenture)

  • About two-thirds of workers would trade their work-related data for more customized compensation, benefits and rewards and 61% would do the same for more customized learning and development opportunities (Accenture)

  • 72% of employees object to being electronically surveilled over their own emails, internet use and other personal activity (HR Metrics & Analytics Summit)

  • Seven in ten workers are in uncertain jobs, but can be prepared for the future (Pearson)

  • Total employer compensation costs for private industry workers averaged $29.99 per hour worked, vs $43.10 for state and local government employees (Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Annual-Cost-of-Employee-BenefitsWages and salaries averaged $21.96 per hour worked and accounted for 68.8% of these costs; benefits averaged $9.97 per hour worked and accounted for the remaining 31.2% (Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 68% of men and 72% of women say work is more than just a means to making a living (Sharefile)

  • More than a third of U.S. workers use their own money to cover work-related expenses at least once a month, for an average claim of $110.90 (Conferma)

  • About 45% of employees are short on cash because of their employer’s reimbursement deadline (Conferma)

  • 60% of workers said they had less money for personal expenses in the short-term, with work spending averaging $116.30 a month, the highest among all age groups (Conferma)

  • Nearly half of employees said they would stop paying for business expenses if they have to wait a long time to get reimbursed (Conferma)

  • 20% of employees said they would stop going on business trips and 51% said they would stop meeting with current or prospective clients and end marketing activities if they have to wait a long time to get reimbursed (Conferma)

  • A third of women do not believe they are making as much as their male counterparts even though they have similar experience and qualifications; 12% of men feel the same way (CareerBuilder)

  • 35% of women don’t expect to reach a salary over $50,000 during their career, compared to 17% of men, while 47% of men expect to reach a six-figure salary, compared to 22% of women (CareerBuilder)

  • 94% of employers think there should be equality of pay in the U.S. (CareerBuilder)

  • 15% of employers do not believe female workers make the same wage as their male counterparts at their organization (CareerBuilder)

  • 50% of HR managers think that female workers make the same wage as their male counterparts at their organization, and 35% said they would hope they do (CareerBuilder)

  • 34% of women are satisfied with career advancement opportunities at their current employer, compared to 44% of men (CareerBuilder)

  • Engagement for women dropped 13% in the first two years on the job, but dropped only 9% for men during the same period (Aon)

  • There was a 16% drop in the number of women who felt they were fairly compensated by the end of year two, though that same measure dropped just 10% for men (Aon)

  • Among workers under age 25, 46% of men felt they were paid fairly vs. 37% of women (Aon)

  • 23% of female workers don’t feel like they are paid fairly compared to their counterparts (Randstad)
  • 40% of employees have discussed salary with a coworker before, and 49% of female workers would leave a job if they learned a male counterpart was making 25% more (Randstad)

  • 62% of men under the age of 25 were more likely to feel they had enough opportunities to gain new skills vs. 52% of women in the same age group (Aon)

  • 51% of men say their organization does an adequate job of matching performance to pay, while only 43% of women say the same (Mercer)

  • 51% of men say their performance is rewarded when they do a good job vs. 41% of women (Mercer)

  • 20% of Millennial women and 25% of Baby Boomer women “strongly agree” that women are less likely to be considered for senior-level roles in a business/corporate setting than their male counterparts (Nielsen)
  • Women of color are 19% less likely to receive a raise than white men and men of color are 25% less likely (PayScale)

  • 70% of workers received a wage increase with 39% receiving the amount they asked for and 31% receiving less (PayScale)

  • A third of workers reported getting a raise before they requested one (PayScale)

  • The most common justification for not granting workers a raise was budget restraints (49%) (PayScale)

  • Among the employees who were told a budget couldn’t accommodate their pay increase, only 22% believed this rationale (PayScale)

  • 23% of men and women ages 18-35 say they feel their gender has held them back in their careers (Comparably)

  • 51% of women say their gender has held them back at work (Comparably)

  • 78% of workers say a workplace where people are treated equally – regardless of gender, sexual orientation, age, race, or religion – is important to them (Randstad)

  • 56% of female workers and 52% of male workers believe their employers could do more to promote gender equality and diversity (Randstad)

  • 54% of employees strongly or completely agree that their companies have a good representation of female leaders (Randstad)

  • 80% of women agree they would switch employers if they felt another company had greater gender equality (Randstad)

  • 31% of women feel they have as many or more opportunities than men at their current companies (Randstad)

  • 58% of women said a lack of promotion to leadership roles was a top reason for gender inequality in the workplace, compared to 34% of men (Randstad)

  • 63% of men and 62% of women are engaged in their jobs (Aon)

  • Women are less likely to feel that action will be taken on issues of workplace fairness (57% for women vs. 62% for men) (Aon)

  • 63% of men think their companies are doing a pretty good job supporting diversity, but 23% of women say there is more room for improvement (Lean In)

  • Women are less likely to think that organizational leadership is worthy of trust (61% of women vs. 66% of men) (Aon)

  • Women feel less challenged at work (66% for women vs. 71% for men) (Aon)

  • Women feel like they have less influence in decisions than their male counterparts do (57% vs. 62%) (Aon)

  • Women feel the results they get at work are not as connected to their pay (47% of women vs. 52% of men) (Aon)

  • The likelihood of staying on the job dropped by 12% for women, but only 4% for men in year two (Aon)

  • 10% of workers have seen an employee get demoted (OfficeTeam)

  • The #1 reason given for a demotion was poor performance (39%), followed by not succeeding in a position to which a worker was promoted (38%), organizational restructuring (16%) and voluntary demotions (6%) (OfficeTeam)

  • 39% of HR pros evaluate recognition programs with employee surveys; 35% do not measure their employee recognition programs (Michael C. Fina)
  • When asked to rank what signified a career advancement to them, women ranked “more money” and “a higher title” higher than men, who ranked “more direct reports,” “expanded responsibility” and “more face time with company executives” higher than women (BambooHR)
  • 44% of employees say that leadership at their companies is equipped to lead their organizations to success (Oxford Economics
  • 60% of executives think Millennials are frustrated with manager quality, only 18% of Millennials say they are (Oxford Economics
  • 71% of employees think it’s okay to “friend” coworkers on Facebook (OfficeTeam)

  • Employees feel it’s okay to follow coworkers on Twitter (61%), Instagram (56%) and Snapchat (44%) (OfficeTeam)

  • 30% of Gen Z said not socializing with team members was one of the most frustrating managerial behaviors – 15% higher than Gen X and 23% higher than the baby boom generation (Sharefile)

  • 49% of managers think it’s okay for employees to interact on Facebook, Twitter (34%), Instagram (30%) and Snapchat (26%) (OfficeTeam)

  • 32% of all employees want to see and understand the progress they've made toward goals set by their manager (Ultimate Software
  • 75% of Gen Z employees want a boss who coaches employees (InsideOut)

  • 75% of Gen Z employees believe they should be promoted after one year in their first position (InsideOut)

  • 40% of Gen Z employees think they’ll earn more than $100,000 a year at the peak of their career (InsideOut)

  • 80% of Gen Z employees think they’ll need a bachelor’s degree to get their dream job but only 30% think they’ll be able to repay their student loans (InsideOut)

  • 49% of Gen Z employees said employers can do more to promote inclusion in the workplace (InsideOut)

  • About two-thirds of Gen Z said they want to hear timely, constructive performance feedback throughout the year (EY)

  • 63% of Gen Z said it’s important to work with people who have various skill levels and educational backgrounds (EY)

  • 20% of Gen Z believes a work team’s most important element is its construction of people from different ethnicities (EY)

  • More than 75% of Gen Z said they’d prefer to have a millennial as a boss over a baby boomer or Gen Xer (EY)

  • 60% of U.S. employees said their employer gave them a way to provide feedback about their own employee experience, but only 30% said their feedback was acted upon (Qualtrics)

  • 42% of Millennials want feedback every week. This is over twice the percentage of every other generation (Ultimate Software
  • 19% of Millennials say they receive routine feedback from managers (Gallup)
  • 17% of Millennials say the feedback they receive from managers is meaningful (Gallup)
  • 31% of Boomers felt they needed less feedback than millennials or Gen X (Korn Ferry)
  • 68% of employees who receive accurate and consistent feedback feel fulfilled in their jobs (Clutch)
  • 40% of millennials do not consider themselves fulfilled at work (Clutch)
  • 74% of Gen Z said work should have a greater purpose than earning a salary, compared to 45% of millennials, 40% of Generation X, and 33% of boomers (Monster)
  • 82% of full-time workers consider at least one of their co-workers to be a friend (Olivet College)

  • Full-time workers considered 41% of their fellow employees as co-workers rather than friends and participants saw another 22% of co-workers as strangers (Olivet College)

  • A fifth of colleagues were named “only-at-work friends” and 15% snagged the title of real friends; 2% were labeled enemies (Olivet College)

  • Full-time employees said they have an average of five friends at work and 29% said they have found a best friend in a colleague (Olivet College)

  • 76% of employees said they’re satisfied with the number of friends they have, while 20% said they wish they had more (Olivet College)

  • 58% of full time employees said they typically befriend a co-worker within a few days or weeks, with those in the marketing, insurance, retail, restaurant and real estate industries making friends the fastest and those in HR, engineering, finance, healthcare and government taking longer to form friendships (Olivet College)

  • 54% of Gen Z say the people they work with is the attribute that matters most in order to do their best work (Future Workplace)
  • In entry-level roles, 82% of certified professionals report they’ve been promoted in the past five years vs. 68% of those who aren’t certified (PayScale)

  • One in four U.S adults (24.6%) receive company emails on their mobile device (Samanage)
  • Young Millennials age 18-24 (25.1%) and older Millennials age 25-34 (29.2%) are more than twice as likely to get company emails on their mobile device compared to Baby Boomers age 65+ (12.2%) (Samanage)
  • 19.2% of employees very often wake up to check email (Samanage)
  • 36.8% of employees checked work emails during dinner, just not recently, and 23.6% very often check work emails during dinner (Samanage)
  • 63.6% of Baby Boomers (ages 65+) said they have never checked work emails during dinner (Samanage)
  • 35.2% of employes spend more than 1 hour checking email outside of work (Samanage)
  • 10.5% of employees check work email after hours because their boss or client expects it  (Samanage)
  • 67% of Americans favor increased overtime eligibility (Gallup)
  • 20% of U.S. adults admitted negative feelings, including feeling overwhelmed and frustrated, toward checking email outside of work (Samanage)
  • 54% of millennials would quit their job and start a business in the next six months if they had the tools and resources needed, compared to 41% of all adults (America's Small Business Development Centers)
  • 38% of millennials ages 18-35 say they plan to start their own company in the next five years (Comparably)

  • 63% of adults under 45 say that “owning their own business would be the best employment scenario” (Finn Futures
  • 61% of millennials say there is more job security in owning their own business than in working for someone else; 64% of boomers think there is greater job security in working for someone else than in owning their own business (America's Small Business Development Centers)
  • 42% of applicants lack the required skills for a job, but 84% of HR leaders said they are willing to hire and train those without the required skills (Robert Half)

     

  • 62% of employees were offered a position even though they were under-qualified and 70% think their companies are somewhat open to hiring and training less-than-qualified candidates (Robert Half)

  • 30% of employees have the skills they need to perform their work today and only 20% of employees have the skills needed for both current and future jobs (Gartner)

  • 64% of managers say they don’t think their own employees will be able to keep pace with skills needed in the future (Gartner)

  • 40% of Millennials who plan to remain in their jobs beyond 2020 say their employers have a strong sense of purpose beyond financial success (Deloitte
  • 71% of Millennials expecting to leave their employer in the next two years are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed (Deloitte)
  • 70% of employees ranked being empowered to take action at work when a problem or opportunity arose as an important element of their engagement (SHRM)
  • Employees who feel their voice is heard at work are 4.6 times more likely to feel empowered to perform their best work (Salesforce.com)
  • Empowerment and voice was a contributor to a positive employee experience (17%) (Globoforce)

  • 28% of workers ages 18-35 said they were somewhat or very likely to share their salary with coworkers; only 12% of workers older than 40 said the same (Comparably)

  • 27% of millennial workers ages 18-35 said their decision to discuss their salary with coworkers is dependent on the situation (Comparably)

  • 22% of millennials ages 31-35 were somewhat or very likely to reveal their salary to coworkers (Comparably)

  • 32% of workers were not likely to share their compensation details, and 22% said they would never do it (Comparably)

  • 82% of professionals said they would be comfortable reporting to a manager who’s younger than they are (OfficeTeam)

  • 91% of professionals wouldn’t mind supervising employees older than themselves (OfficeTeam)

  • Professionals identified dissimilar work ethics/values (26%) and leadership/learning styles (22%) as the biggest challenges with having a younger boss (OfficeTeam)

  • 25% of professionals cited using technology in different ways as the top struggle when managing someone older (OfficeTeam)

  • 87% of workers believe a multigenerational workforce fosters innovation and problem-solving (Randstad)

  • 90% of workers prefer having colleagues of various ages and think a multigenerational workplace benefits everyone (Randstad)

  • 84% of workers said as long as a manger could inspire and lead a group, age wouldn’t matter (Randstad)

  • 76% of workers said they preferred their direct manager to have at least a few years on them (Randstad)

  • 92% of workers ages 25-34 agreed they preferred an older boss (Randstad)

  • More than 38% of workers said they found communicating with coworkers of a different age group difficult (Randstad)

  • Men (49%) had more difficulty than women (27%) communicating with coworkers from other age groups (Randstad)

  • Workers age 55+ are the most comfortable having a younger boss (93%) and managing someone older (95%) (OfficeTeam)

  • Those ages 18-34 (26%) and 35-54 (27%) are more likely to cite technology as a concern in overseeing an older employee (OfficeTeam)

  • 43% of workers in the tech industry worry that they’ll lose their job because of their age (Indeed)

  • 41% of companies have made changes to adapt to younger workers (Duke/CFO
  • 57% of small businesses offer different benefit packages or perks to attract young talent (Vistage)
  • 53% of those who do have employee perks say that those perks give them a better quality of life (Clutch)

  • 70% of employers are impacted by prescription drug misuse (NSC)

  • 48% of employers identified a negative business impact from prescription drug misuse (NSC)

  • 10% of companies reported an employee prescription drug overdose (NSC)

  • 20% of companies reported knowledge of employees selling or borrowing prescription medications or having drug-related arrests (NSC)

  • Professionals said they spend an average of 25.5 minutes per day on sports-related activities in the office during the college basketball playoffs. With the tournament spread across 15 workdays, that’s 6 hours per employee (OfficeTeam)

  • 46% of employees love being able to keep up with sports and bond with coworkers at work (OfficeTeam)

  • 33% of employees are not particularly into sports, but are ok playing along with activities during work (OfficeTeam)

  • 21% of employees would rather just focus on work and not celebrate sports during work (OfficeTeam)

  • 62% of managers say employees take time to check game scores and team rankings at work during major sporting events (OfficeTeam)

  • 59% of managers say employees increase their frequency of sports talk at work around major sporting events (OfficeTeam)

  • 91% of fashion professionals believe they are able to create collaborative teams within their workplace and 86% believe they can for effective cross-functional relationships (BoF)

  • Almost 30% of employees witnessed at least one act of misconduct at work (Gartner)

  • HR professionals cite the top two reasons for hiring gig workers as the ability to bring them in for short-term projects and the high-quality, specialized expertise they provide that’s not always found in-house (Korn Ferry)

  • 67% of HR professionals said they are confident about knowing what gig workers do daily, despite the fact that many of these workers do their jobs remotely (Korn Ferry)

  • Two-thirds of HR professionals said they try to integrate contingent workers into the workplace culture (Korn Ferry)

  • Almost 60% of HR professionals think gig workers positively impact the workplace culture (Korn Ferry)

  • Almost two-thirds of expecting mothers said that a stigma surrounds breastfeeding in the workplace (Aeroflow)

  • 47% of expecting mothers had considered a job or career change because of their need to pump at work (Aeroflow)

  • About 50% of expecting mothers discussed their needs with a supervisor and/or HR; 20% hadn’t discussed it and were worried about their supervisor’s reaction (Aeroflow)

  • Just under 50% of expecting mothers said their employers have a breastfeeding or pumping policy, and nearly the same number have a designated lactation area (Aeroflow)

  • About one-third of expecting mothers have had a negative interaction with a coworker over breastfeeding (Aeroflow)

  • Fewer than 25% of employers think caregiving influences employee performance, while more than 80% of employees said caretaking responsibilities have affected their productivity (The Caring Company)

  • 75% of employees have some type of caretaking responsibility, but 52% of employers do not track data on how many employees have these duties (The Caring Company)

  • 28% of employees with caregiving responsibilities reported that caregiving hurt their careers (The Caring Company)

  • One-third of all workers, 50% ages 26-35 and 27% ages 18-25 had quit a job to attend to caregiving responsibilities (The Caring Company)

  • Caretaking-related exit rates rose with position ranking: 23% of ages 26-35, 44% of managers of employees, 53% of managers of managers and 61% of senior leaders had quit (The Caring Company)

  • 57% of employees with caretaking responsibilities who left a job did so to take care of a newborn or newly adopted child, and more than 40% left needing to care for a sick child or manage a child’s daily needs (The Caring Company)

  • A Third of workers left a position because they needed to care for an elderly relative (The Caring Company)

  • 25% of workers quit to care for an ill or disabled spouse, partner or family member (The Caring Company)

  • 40% of employers keep their recruitment efforts in-house to save money (Career Builder, Inavero & American Staffing Association)

  • 28% of employers said they don’t work with staffing agencies because the agencies don’t hire for the types of positions needed (Career Builder, Inavero & American Staffing Association)

  • 26% of employers think the best candidates don’t work with staffing agencies (Career Builder, Inavero & American Staffing Association)

  • Hiring managers’ pain points include reaching candidates with the right skills (52%), time to hire (40%) and budget (34%) (Career Builder, Inavero & American Staffing Association)

  • Two-thirds of hiring managers feel that using a staffing firm gives them access to the right candidates (Career Builder, Inavero & American Staffing Association)

  • 25% of corporate professionals believe their jobs are more secure than those within the U.S. government, but 89% still prefer to work in the private sector (Korn Ferry)

  • Nearly two-thirds of businesses were worried the partial government shutdown would have a negative impact on their business (Korn Ferry)

  • Nearly half of businesses said the partial government shutdown affected their employees’ morale and 31% said it affected employees’ productivity (Korn Ferry)

  • 70% of corporate professionals believe federal workers would be less engaged after returning to work after the partial government shutdown compared to 87% who said employees in their own organizations would be less motivated after returning to work following a work stoppage or strike (Korn Ferry)

  • 75% of corporate professionals weren’t worried that job competition would increase as a result of government employees looking for new opportunities in the private sector during the partial government shutdown (Korn Ferry)

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Topics: Employee Engagement + Loyalty, Benefits Trends

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