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It can be argued that employee benefits and perks have never played a more significant role in the workplace.

What was once something companies used to stand out from the crowd have become essential tools of engagement and productivity, not to mention vital to recruitment.

Need proof of just how important benefits and perks are throughout a successful office?

Check the stats below.

We're compiling every relevant piece of public data about benefits - how they impact employee retention and recruitment, how much they cost, which ones people want and which ones are falling flat, and so on.

Subscribe and check back regularly - we're constantly adding new stats to the list.

Need more? These and stats from recent years are all included in our Ultimate Collection of Employee Benefits database. We also maintain a huge collection of employee engagement and loyalty stats, to help you get a complete picture of what's happening in offices across the country.
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We used to keep these statistics on our employee engagement and loyalty stats page, but we feel like benefits are complex enough to merit their own collection. Like each of our stat pages, we'll update this one on a weekly basis.

Have data you'd like to see on these pages? Drop us a link in the comments.

This page is brought to you courtesy of Access Perks, our employee discount program built for small- and medium-sized businesses. Click here to check it out and learn more

Benefits and Employee Engagement/Retention/Recruitment Stats

  • 12% of businesses are happy with current levels of employee engagement (CBI)

  • 55% of businesses think that stronger engagement would improve their ability to either retain, recruit or carry out succession planning (CBI)

  • Top reasons for leaving a job: insufficient pay (44%), limited career paths (43%), lack of challenging work (30%), work-life balance (28%), and lack of recognition (27%) (Randstad)

  • 44% of businesses think improved employee engagement would lead to them better being able to retain, whilst 36% think it would have a positive impact on recruitment (CBI)

  • 42% of businesses report that their ability to recruit has been improved by their pension scheme (CBI)

  • 42% of businesses report that pension provision has a positive impact on employee retention (CBI)

  • 66% of firms believe educating staff about the benefits of saving through workplace pensions can help influence employee engagement on pensions, wider financial education (58%), the use of simpler language and minimal jargon in pension communication (63%), technology (54%), and individualizing pension communications as far as possible (49%) (CBI)

  • 63% of businesses include pensions in an employee’s induction process, 60% include guidance from an external provider, 54% a sign-post staff to publicly available pension guidance, 51% offer a digital information portal for staff and 49% deliver in-house webinars/seminars (CBI)

  • 23% of full-time employees do not receive any benefits from their employers (Clutch)
  • 52% of employees who aren’t satisfied with their benefits want more of a benefit they already have (Clutch)

  • 14% of employees want different benefits altogether (Clutch)

  • 32% of employees say that they feel neutral about, or are not satisfied with, the benefits they receive (Clutch)

  • Gen Xers are slightly more satisfied with their benefits than millennials (53% vs 52%), and 49% of boomers report they are satisfied with their benefits (LIMRA)

  • Dissatisfaction stems from employees’ need for additional benefits (57%), the desire for benefits they currently don’t have (24%), benefits they can’t use (22%) and benefits they feel pressured not to use (8%) (Clutch)

  • It’s to the employer’s advantage, even for small businesses, to offer benefits in the quest to attract top talent and keep their good employees from jumping ship (Clutch)

  • 47% of employees want to receive rewards spontaneously (Xexec)

  • 38% of employees want to receive rewards in exchange for good work (Xexec)

  • 52% of employees would rather celebrate rewards with their families than with colleagues (Xexec)

  • 73% of organizations have an employee recognition awards program in place (Globoforce)

  • The top four reasons retail employees leave their jobs – poor management, scheduling difficulties, lack of training, falling wages (WorkJam)

  • 62% of retail managers say they have lost employees due to scheduling conflicts (WorkJam)

  • 50% of adults would leave their current job for better benefits (Yoh)

  • 42% of adults said they’d jump ship for a flexible work option (Yoh)

  • Roughly one-third of adults would leave their job for a higher-level position, a better company culture or a shorter commute (Yoh)

  • 83% of employees say health insurance is very or extremely important in deciding whether to stay in or change jobs (EBRI)

New Call-to-action2018 Salary and Base Compensation Stats

  • 48% of hiring decision makers note salary and compensation is the most influential factor for a candidate decision on where to work (Glassdoor)

  • 85% of managers claim they know how to explain pay decisions to employees, and only 37% of organizations agree (PayScale)

  • 59% of employers say they do not plan to make any changes to their executive compensation strategies (WTW)

  • 67% of managers think employees are fairly paid, while only 21% of employees think their pay is adequate (PayScale)

  • 44% of employees believe they are paid at or above market rate (Hays)

  • 19% of U.S. workers are satisfied with their current salaries (Indeed)

  • 60% of U.S. workers said it would take an extra $6,000 per year to feel comfortable/satisfied with their job (Indeed)

  • 60% of workers said they want a raise simply because they feel their performance merits one (Indeed)

  • 39% of job finalists tried to negotiate a higher salary than the one offered (Robert Half)

  • Employers said they were more comfortable negotiating a higher salary with a new employer (54%) than they were asking for a raise in their current job (49%) (Robert Half)

  • More than 21% of men were dissatisfied with their earnings, compared with 16% of women (Indeed)

  • 53.1% of women and 52.9% of men plan to ask for a raise (Indeed)

  • 23% of female workers don’t feel like they are paid fairly compared to their counterparts (Randstad)

  • 40% of employees have discussed salary with a coworker before, and 49% of female workers would leave a job if they learned a male counterpart was making 25% more (Randstad)

  • 53% of employees believe unequal pay is the top factor impacting gender inequality, while 49% attribute outdated biases and stereotypes as the second-leading factor (Randstad)

  • Men are offered higher salaries than women for the same work 63% of the time (Hire)

  • Companies pay women on average 4% to as much at 45% less than men in the same jobs (Hire)

  • 54% of women found out they were being paid less than a male peer in the same role, compared to 19% of men who learned they were paid less than a colleague (Hire)

  • Employers paid African-American and Hispanic women 90 cents for every dollar they paid white men in the same roles (Hire)

  • Women in education technology received 10% less than men doing similar work, and women in the health and finance industries were paid 7% less than their male peers (Hire)

  • The wage gap between men and women was 8% in the San Francisco Bay area and 11% in Seattle, which had the highest gender gap (Hire)

  • More than two-thirds of workers said they’d prefer additional benefits over a pay raise, citing healthcare (36%) first, followed by flexible work hours (35%) and yearly holiday leave (34%) (Indeed)

  • 45% of hiring decision makers note that salary is the top reason for employees changing jobs (Glassdoor)

  • 60% of organizations said they’re very concerned about worker retention in 2018, but 73% expect wage increases to remain at or under 3% as they were in 2017 (PayScale)

  • One of the most common recruiting methods is offering competitive salaries (43%) (Hays)

  • 62% of managers boosted a salary offer to woo a specific candidate (Hays)

  • 24% of Gen Xers say the desire for financial stability motivates them to stay in a job (Purchasing Power)

  • 48% of employers reported plans for increasing wages in 2018 compared to 58% in 2017 (LaSalle Network)

  • 76% of business leaders plan to raise wages (JPMorgan Chase & Co)

  • 44% of workers said their employers could improve their happiness by awarding a pay raise of 25%, and 33% said their happiness would improve with a 10% raise (One4all)

  • 46% of Millennials have asked for a raise in the last two years (Bank of America)

  • 80% of Millennials who asked for a raise got one (Bank of America)

  • 71% of employers raised salaries in 2017; 43% did so by more than 3% (Hays)

  • In order to receive an immediate 10% annual raise in salary, Americans would give up: dental care for the next five years (40.06%), all social media accounts for the next five years (53.55%), watching Game of Thrones for life (88.61%), exercise for the next five years (43.86%), the right to vote in all elections for life (34.98%), their child’s future or future child’s right to vote in all elections for life (9.13%), all alcoholic beverages for the next five years (73.42%), Social Security benefits for the next two years (17.93%), access to health insurance for the next five years (18.9%), watching movies for the next three years (50.65%), all their vacation days for the next five years (15.27%), and all caffeinated  products for the next two years (47.74%) (Hire)

  • In order to receive an immediate 10% annual raise in salary, Americans would: eat a single tide pod (5.33%), work one day every weekend for the next year (50.4%), work an extra 10 hours per week for life (55.9%), and break up with their partner or significant other (12.2%) (Hire)

  • 38% of U.S. hourly workers who make $20 or less per hour say they’re struggling to make ends meet (Snag)

  • 80% of underemployed workers are willing to work more than one job to earn a living wage, but 74% would prefer having one full-time, decent-paying job (Snag)

  • 47% of restaurant workers, 41% of retail workers and 38% of hospitality workers consider themselves underemployed (Snag)

  • 54% of underemployed workers are actively looking for a better-paying full-time job (Snag)

  • 36% of millennial workers plan to take a pay cut to work fewer hours (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 16% of workers claim their jobs don’t offer them the opportunity to add money to their savings (Bankrate)

  • The annual media base pay in the U.S. grew only .9% year over year in January 2018 to $51,364 (Glassdoor)

  • The industry with the biggest wage gain was medical technology, in which the median salary rose 4.1% to $54,747 (Glassdoor)

  • The largest compensation gap exists in the retail sector, where the median employee only makes $13,000 a year, 669 times less than a typical retail CEO, who makes $8.7 million a year (Equilar)

  • Companies worth less than $700 million had an average pay ratio of 45-to-1, while those worth more than $25 billion had pay ratios of 250-to-1 (Equilar)

  • There is a large compensation gap in the healthcare sector, where the typical CEO makes 150 times more than the median employee (Equilar)

  • The energy sector showed the lowest pay disparity with CEOs making 72 times as much as the median worker (Equilar)

  • 63% of top-performing companies don’t plan to conduct audits of their pay practices to look for ethnicity and gender gaps (PayScale)

  • Minimum wage violations are causing affected workers to lose out on an estimated $15 billion in wages (Politico)

  • 41% of the wages states order employers to pay workers aren’t recovered (Politico)

  • 66% of employees said they’d rather receive two tickets to a concert of their choice than three times the value of those tickets paid into their paycheck over the course of a year; 34% of employees chose the money (Xexec)

  • 35% of employees chose a small token gift like cake, ice cream or chocolate, while 65% chose receiving 10 times its monetary value in additional salary (Xexec)

  • Cybersecurity professionals of color earn, on average $115,000 a year compared with $122,000 industry average (ISC)²

  • Whites in cybersecurity are more likely to receive a salary increase in the past year than those of other races and ethnicities (ISC)²

2018 Healthcare and Wellness Benefits Stats

  • Costs for employer sponsored-medical plans in 2018 are likely to rise 8.4% (Aon)

  • 71% of adults with employer-provided coverage are satisfied with their current health insurance plan, while 19% are dissatisfied and 9% say they have neither favorable nor unfavorable opinions (AHIP)

  • 52% of adults with employer-provided coverage say their premiums and deductibles are reasonable, while 41% say their premiums are unreasonable and 36% say their deductibles are unreasonable (AHIP)

  • When asked if they had a medical emergency and were required to go to the hospital, 75% of adults with employer-provided coverage say their coverage would protect them from the majority of their medical costs, while 25% do not have confidence their plan would adequately protect them (AHIP)

  • 3% of large self-insured employers contract directly with an accountable care organization for healthcare services (National Business Group on Health)

  • Workplace stress accounts for as much as $190 billion in healthcare costs (Udemy)

  • 66% of HR managers say their organization’s health and wellness offerings have increased in the past five years (Robert Half)

  • 89% of employees think their organizations support their health and wellness goals (Robert Half)

  • 44% of professionals said they eat healthier when they work from home (Robert Half)

  • Many employees felt food habits were an obstacle to health and wellness goals, including food at office celebrations (30%), snacks brought by coworkers (22%) and free meals (10%) (Robert Half)

  • 23% of employers are planning to add a financial wellness program in 2018 (Castlight Health)

  • 83% of employers offer financial wellness programs, up from 20% two years earlier (Prudential)

  • 14% of employers say they plan to offer financial wellness programs in the next one or two years (Prudential)

  • 91% of employers plan to develop or expand their financial well-being programs (Alight)

  • 56% of employers believe their wellness programs have encouraged employees to live a healthier lifestyle, but only 32% of employees agree (WTW)

  • 46% of employees say they would participate in health and wellness programs only if offered incentives (WTW)

  • 62% of employers say they provide wellness programs, but only 40% of employees say their organizations offer them (Transamerica Center)

  • 34% of employers said they are considering expanding financial education programs for workers (WTW)

  • If offered financial programs at work, 89% of Gen Xers would participate in them (Purchasing Power)

  • 68% of workers want comprehensive financial planning to help them plan for healthcare costs in retirement and figure out how much they need to save for their post-work years (EBRI)

  • 13% of employees report their employers offered student-loan-debt relief/payment assistance in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 48% of workers are interested in debt counseling, 47% day-to-day budgeting and 39% in student loan debt assistance (EBRI)

  • 78% of workers with student loan debt, including 65% of workers over age 55 with current or future loan debt, want their workplace to offer student loan benefits (CommonBond)

  • While student loan repayment is the most requested financial benefit, it’s only third on HR’s list of priority benefits (CommonBond)

  • Top reasons employers don’t have a financial wellness program include: don’t know how/where to start (31%), not a priority (28%), lack of internal resources (28%), no leadership support (10%) and employees aren’t interested (4%) (EBRI)

  • 25% of employees lack health coverage (Clutch)

  • 71% of Americans are satisfied with their current employer-sponsored health plan (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 56% of Americans said their health plan is the reason they’ve stayed at their current job (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 71% of Americans worry that healthcare costs will continue to increase (America’s Health Insurance)

  • Comprehensive benefits ranked higher in importance among Americans (58%) than affordability of plans (42%) (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 46% of Americans said their health plan was either a deciding factor, or a positive influence, in the decision to take their current job (America’s Health Insurance)

  • Americans said the most important benefits are prescription drug coverage (51%), preventive healthcare (47%) and emergency services (47%) (America’s Health Insurance)

  • 55% of employees cited health coverage as the greatest driver of job satisfaction, followed by paid vacation (18%), overtime pay (11%) and retirement plans (10%) (Clutch)

  • 67% of employees report that their employers offered health insurance in 2017, up from 63% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 38% of full-time employees don’t have a health insurance plan through their employer (Clutch)

  • 44% of millennials (18-34) name health insurance as the most important benefit they receive (Clutch)

  • 62% of Generation X and baby boomers say health insurance is the most important benefit to receive (Clutch)

  • 20% more employers are offering at least one HDHP compared to 2016 (Benefit Focus)

  • Employees in high deductible health plans grew by more than 60%, from roughly 50% in 2017 to 81% in 2018 (Benefitfocus)

  • HDHP offering rates have increased 76% in the West since 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees in the West made and received the highest HSA contributions, with employee contributions averaging $1,490 and employer contributions averaging $750 for individual plans, up 11% from 2017 and 19% from 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • HDHPs are most prevalent in the Midwest, where 70% of employers offer them alongside traditional health plans, up from 46% in 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • 37% of Midwestern employees selected an HDHP, the highest adoption rate in the country (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees in the Midwest play the lowest preferred provider organization premiums in the country, at less than $1,500 annually for single coverage (Benefitfocus)

  • Employees in the Northeast pay the most for their health plan premiums, both for PPOs ($1,692 for single coverage plans) and HDHPs ($1,237) (Benefitfocus)

  • The average employer HAS contribution (single coverage) has increased 10% year over year (Benefitfocus)

  • Southern workers carry higher-than-average financial responsibility for their health plans, paying the steepest PPO and HDHP deductibles in the country- $1,300 and $2,416 for single coverage; this is 28% higher than the nationwide average for PPOs and 11% higher than the nationwide average for HDHPS (Benefitfocus)

  • Growth in HSA-eligible health plans has declined since 2007, from a high of 70% down to 12% and then to 0% in 2017 (EBRI)

  • Participation in health savings accounts (HSAs) rose to 81% in 2018 (Benefit Focus)

  • 22% of employers offer a health savings account in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 72% of Culture of Health (CoH) companies recognize wellness as important to their overall business strategy vs. just 11% of non-CoH companies (Optum)

  • 60% of companies offer wellness programs to stay competitive when attracting and retaining employees vs. 14% of those companies with no identified culture of health (Optum)

  • Nearly 20% of 24-35 year olds said reputation for ethical behavior, diversity and inclusion as well as workplace wellbeing were important when choosing an employer (Deloitte)

  • 86% of employers offer financial incentives for participation in well-being programs, with an average incentive of $784, up from $742 last year and 50% higher than 2013’s average of $521 (Fidelity Investments)

  • Nearly 3 in 10 employers said they plan to continue increasing incentives over the next 3-5 years for participating in well-being programs (Fidelity Investments)

  • 67% of employers intend to offer well-being programs not focused on physical health in coming years (Fidelity Investments)

  • 92% of employers plan to expand well-being programs in emotional health, financial wellness (90%), stress management (77%), community involvement (72%) and social connectedness (60%) (Fidelity Investments)

  • 66% of Culture of Health employers believe wellness programs foster employee productivity compared to 18% of their counterparts (Optum)

  • 61% of companies plan to increase their wellness budget over the next three years (Optum)

  • 95% of Culture of Health employers take advantage of these tools, just 55% of non-CoH companies do (Optum)

  • 99% of Culture of Health companies offer incentives, averaging $585 per year vs. 89% of non-CoH companies offering an average incentive of $485 per year (Optum)

  • Culture of Health employers believe their programs have made employees more confident in their health care navigation skills (64% vs. 11% of non-CoH companies) (Optum)

2018 Retirement Benefits Stats

  • 88% of employees say bosses should provide help saving for retirement, compared with 84% of employers (Alight Solutions)
  • 57% of employees report that their employers offered a retirement savings plan in 2017, up from 53% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • Two-thirds of millennials had not saved a single dollar for retirement savings (NIRS)

  • 15% of pre-retirees say their retirement savings are ahead of schedule, and 51% saying they’re behind schedule (Society of Actuaries)

  • 70% of employers added Roth features to their 401k plans, up from 54% in 2014 (WTW)

  • 20% of employers said they were considering accelerating contributions to defined benefit plans (WTW)

  • 73% of employers offer auto-enrollment in defined contribution plans and 47% found the enhancement too costly (WTW)

  • Across two-thirds of businesses, only 5% or less of eligible workers have opted out of Auto Enrollment (CBI)

  • Of the 25% of employers who increased their matching contribution during the past five years, 51% did so to encourage employees’ savings and engagement, and 44% did it to offset defined contribution plan changes (WTW)

  • 80% of employers added health savings accounts to defined contribution plans (WTW)

  • 78% of employers want to improve their efforts to educate employees about retirement plans, with 64% planning to offer guidance on how to draw down balances after employees retire (WTW)

  • 35% of employers measure the retirement readiness of their participants annually, and 88% only measure basic plan statistics (WTW)

  • 69% of small business owners don’t feel fully prepared for retirement (Paychex)
  • 59% of small business owners don’t think they can afford a retirement plan (Paychex)

  • 44% of small business owners don’t see the need or benefit to offering a retirement plan (Paychex)

  • Across two-thirds of businesses, only 5% or less of eligible workers have opted out of Auto Enrollment (CBI)

  • 26% of employees report their employers offered a traditional pension in 2017, down from 29% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 69% say a firm’s pension scheme is an important factor when looking for a new job (CBI)

  • 47% of businesses believe that recent pension freedoms have led to employees being more engaged (CBI)

  • Employees aged 50+ are almost twice as likely as those under 34 to be engaged in their pension (87% vs 48%) (CBI)

  • Workers on a higher wage (87%) are significantly more engaged in their pension than those on lower wages (33%) (CBI)

  • 70% of employees of more than ten years are engaged with their pension (CBI)

  • 86% of people want to retire at or before 65, but only 37% believe this to be an option (Cebr)

  • 20% of people believe they will never be able to retire due to poor financial planning (Cebr)

  • 50% of employees over 55 and 59% of those ages 18-34 believe their employers should be doing more to guarantee their financial stability in retirement (Cebr)

  • 45% of employers said that they would relish their employees working into their eighties (Cebr)

  • 35% of workers that make under $25,000 a year were confident they would have a secure retirement (EBRI)

  • 80% of defined contribution plan participants say they would be very or somewhat interested in an investment option that guarantees income for life when they retire (EBRI)

  • 53% of workers ages 60+ say they are postponing retirement, with 57% of men putting retirement on hold compared to 48% of women (CareerBuilder)

  • 40% of workers don’t think they’ll be able to retire until 70 or older (CareerBuilder)

  • 24% of employees do not know how much they will need to save for retirement, and women are much more likely to be unsure of how much to save than men (31% vs. 17%) (CareerBuilder)

  • 20% of workers think they’ll need to save less than $500,000 in order to retire, 31% said $500,000 to less than $1 million, 14% said $1 million to less than $2 million, 5% said $2 million to less than $3 million, and 7% said $3 million or more (CareerBuilder)

  • 23% of workers ages 55+ and 40% of ages 18-34 said they don’t participate in a 401(k), IRA or other retirement plan (CareerBuilder)

  • 67% of workers in the South and 69% in the Midwest contribute to retirement accounts, compared to 73% in the Northeast and 71% in the West (CareerBuilder)

  • 17% of American workers say they are very confident in their ability to live comfortably throughout retirement (EBRI)

  • 68% of workers expect income from working to be either a major or a minor source of income in retirement, but just 26% of retirees say that this income is a major or minor source (EBRI)

  • 36% of workers expect Social Security to be a major source of retirement income, but 67% of retirees report that Social Security is a major source of income in retirement (EBRI)

  • 46% of workers reported they were very or somewhat confident in Medicare this year, down from 52% in 2017, while 45% were very or somewhat confident in Social Security, down from 51% in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 81% of workers say they expect that a workplace retirement savings plan will be a major or minor source of income, but only 52% of retirees report that a savings plan is a significant source of income for them (EBRI)

  • 76% of workers with a defined contribution plan are at least somewhat confident in their ability to live comfortably in retirement vs. 46% of those without a defined contribution plan (EBRI)

2018 PTO, Vacation and Time Off Stats

  • Paid vacation time (65%) and health insurance (62%) are the most commonly offered benefits (Clutch)
  • 43% of employees said annual leave is the work-related benefit that would make them feel most loved at work, followed by public recognition (15%), team drinks (15%), training (10%), professional mentoring (7%), sleeping in once a week (7%), and getting a parking space for a month (2%) (Xexec)

  • 23% of millennials say that paid vacation time is their top priority, while 14% of Generation X and 12% of Baby Boomers say the same (Clutch)
  • 84% of employees report their employers offered paid vacation time in 2017 (EBRI)

  • Women prioritized vacation time in considering offers, while men favored corporate culture (Accountemps)

  • 26% of workers say vacation time and paid time off are the most important non-salary factors when considering a job offer (Accountemps)

  • 8% of employers say they plan on providing employees with more paid time off in 2018 (LaSalle Network)

  • Just over half of employers offer paid leave to both mothers and fathers, but by 2019, those numbers could rise to as much as 75% for fathers and 80% for mothers (WTW)

  • 20% of LGBTQ employees are afraid to request time off to care for a loved one because it might disclose their LGBTQ identity (Human Rights Campaign)

  • 72% of HR managers say the day after the Super Bowl should be a paid national holiday for employees (OfficeTeam)

  • 21% of employees receive dedicated mental health support from their employer, and an average of 8.4 sick days are taken each year due to a mental health problem (BHSF)

  • 24% of employees worry that if they did need to take a sick day due to a mental health issue, they wouldn’t be taken seriously (BHSF)

  • 71% of employees report their employers offered paid sick leave in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 23% of employees said they would feel more supported if dedicated days off were allocated for mental wellbeing, and a further 22% would benefit from dedicated mental health support staff (BHSF)

  • 46% of employees said they would take a lower paying job with more flexible working arrangements (TSheets)

  • 32% of workers say they feel pressured not to take time off (TSheets)

  • 48% of employees said they do not get enough time off (TSheets)

  • Stress levels were found to be higher among employees who do not get PTO and 51% of them say they are often or always stressed, with 58% describing it as unhealthy (TSheets)

  • 84% of the workforce currently has access to paid time off and 65% did not use all of their PTO allocation last year, with 18% blaming their workload (TSheets)

  • U.S. workers get an average of 11 days paid time off per year and typically don’t use five of these days per year (TSheets)

  • 60% of employees who did take time off last year worked while they were on vacation (TSheets)

  • 74% of employees chose a raise when asked to choose between more PTO and a raise (TSheets)

  • 39% of workers said they would accept a job without PTO (TSheets)

  • 51% of employees admitted they had previously misled a manager about why they need to take time off (TSheets)

  • Top 3 reasons for misleading managers about taking time off are: insomnia (15%), mental health reasons (13%) and physical health reasons (12%) (TSheets)

  • 89% of employees come to work sick with 19% admitting to doing this more than once a month (TSheets)

  • 12% of employees believe employers should not provide sick leave (TSheets)

  • The most desirable PTO benefits are: paid holidays (91%), sick leave (88%), and paid vacation days (87%) (TSheets)

  • 22% of employees said employers should not provide maternity leave while 28% said employers should not provide paid paternity leave (TSheets)

  • 57% of employees ages 55+ said they get more than 11 days of PTO per year while 52% of 18-22 year old employees said they get five days or less (TSheets)

  • 11% of ages 55+ get no PTO compared to 25% of 18-24 year olds (TSheets)

  • 73% of older employees said they did not use all of their PTO last year and 77% admitting to working while they were on PTO (TSheets)

  • Canada employers typically offer 10 days of PTO a year , Australian employers offer between 16-20 PTO days annually, and the U.S. usually offers 11 days per year (TSheets)

  • 16% of American workers say they get no PTO at all compared to 14% of Australian workers and just 8% of Canadian workers (TSheets)

  • 74% of U.S. workers would take a raise over more time off, in Australia this drops to 69% and in Canada to 65% saying they would take more money over more time off (TSheets)

2018 Flexible Working Stats

  • 32% of employees have flexible hours, and 41% of those with perks say that flexible hours are the most important perk they receive (Clutch)

  • 46% of employees said they would take a lower paying job with more flexible working arrangements (TSheets)

  • 89% of employers said flexible working options are important when it comes to staff attraction and retention (Hays)

  • 33% of employees said flexible working options were critical to their remaining in employment (Hays)

  • 63% of employees said flexible work hours were nice to have (Hays)

  • 4% of employees said flexible work was not important to them (Hays)

  • The number of younger people able to work from locations other than their employer’s primary site increased more than 20% compared to 2016 (Deloitte)

  • 84% of employees claimed to work in a job offering some degree of flexibility (Deloitte)

  • 15% or women and 11% of men say that working from home is their top employee perk (Clutch)

  • Employers try to support parents via flexible work locations or schedules (61%), additional unpaid leave (34%), parent support groups (15%), coaching and returning to work after parental leave (13%), overnight breast milk delivery for mothers who travel for work (9%) and concierge services for new parents (7%)  (WTW)

  • 40% of employees said that flexible/remote work options can lower workplace distractions, and 52% say they’re more productive when working remotely (Udemy)

  • Among Millennial and Gen Z employees who said they intend to stay with their current employers for at least 5 years, 55% note greater flexibility in where and when they work now compared to 3 years ago (Deloitte)

  • 61% of employees want appealing and comfortable workspaces, workplace flexibility (53%), perks (47%) and workspaces that provide learning opportunities (32%) (Clutch)

  • 34% of parents felt resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance, with more fathers than mothers expressing this sentiment (37% vs. 32%) (Working Families)

  • 46% of millennial fathers feel resentful about their employer’s approach to work-life balance (Working Families)

  • 37% of parents said that changing company culture to make work-life balance more acceptable should be a priority for employers (Working Families)

  • 11% of workers have refused a new job due to a lack of good work-life balance opportunities, while around 75% of workers would carefully consider their childcare arrangements before taking a promotion or new job (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 23% of workers have reduced their working hours to try and get a better fit between work and family life vs. 14% who work flexibly on an informal basis to achieve this (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 31% of workers are effectively prevented from working flexibly, and 35% who do work flexibly state that their work-life balance is not ideal for them or their family (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 44% of workers feel that flexible working is a genuine work-life balance option for parents in their workplace; however, 34% of workers have faked being ill in order to meet family obligations (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 34% of workers feel resentful towards their employer with regards to work-life balance; this increases to 46% for male millennial workers (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 37% of workers think employers should make efforts to change organizational culture to ensure a good work-life balance, 35% believe more policies that support work-life balance should be implemented and 28% feel that employers should encourage their staff to use existing policies to help their work-life balance (Working Families and Bright Horizons)

  • 82% of U.S. workers say the ability to work from anywhere at any time allows them to maintain a healthy work/life balance, 62% still prefer to work in the office (Randstad)

  • 66% of workers say they like the option of occasionally working from home or another location, but aren’t able to do so (Randstad)

  • 36% of workers report their workplaces support working from home anytime and anywhere they want (Randstad)

  • 35% of employees disagree that their employers provide the necessary technical equipment to enable them to work from home (Randstad)

  • 80% of workers say they like agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) because it increases their productivity, creativity and job satisfaction (Randstad)

  • 61% of workers don’t believe agile work (the ability to work from anywhere, anytime) interferes with their personal lives, or their ability to disconnect from work (Randstad)

  • 53% of small businesses are utilizing flexible talent, up 16 points from 2017 and anticipated to grow by 20% in the next 10 years (Upwork)

  • 60% of small businesses agree that remote work has become more commonplace compared to three years ago (Upwork)

  • 67% of small businesses have someone on their team who works a significant portion of their time remotely, up 13 points from last year (Upwork)

  • In the next 10 years, small businesses predict that 35% of their employees will work predominantly from remote locations (Upwork)

  • 86% of small businesses have made progress in developing a more agile, flexible talent strategy (Upwork)

  • 63% of small businesses agree dynamic team structures will become the norm (Upwork)

  • 81% of parents who said they worked flexibly said they still had to bring work home at evenings or weekends (Working Families)

2018 Benefits Management Stats

  • 75% of HR executives think their benefits offering are innovative, but only 50% of workers agree (CommonBond)

  • 64% of hiring decision makers believe their organization is satisfactory/very satisfactory at clearly setting pay and benefit expectations within job postings (Glassdoor)

  • 26% of employers say they plan on increasing benefits in 2018 (LaSalle Network)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 20% of companies have provided enhanced benefits with 35% of those considering further changes to their benefits package (Pearl Meyer)

  • Of companies that have made changes to their benefits in response to the corporate tax cut, 95% said they have made structural changes to compensation first (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 65% of companies handed out $1,000 one-time bonuses to employees, and 46% of employers increased the minimum wage (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 9% of employers enhanced their benefits packages, with an additional 12% of employers increasing their retirement benefits (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 20% of employers are considering making changes to retirement preparation and enhancing benefits (23%) (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 15% of employers are considering reducing healthcare costs (Pearl Meyer)

  • In response to the corporate tax cut, 52% of employers are not planning any changes to their benefits package because they are unsure of or not anticipating a significant tax benefit (Pearl Meyer)

  • 65% of employees say employers should spend their tax savings on increases in annual and hourly wages (Aon Pulse)

  • 55% of mid to large size employers said they plan on using their tax savings for broad-based expenditures, and 29% plan on allocating savings to employees’ compensation and benefits (Aon Pulse)

  • 67% of brokers who were automation leaders ranked integrated benefits management platforms as a top priority to their clients (Maestro Health)

  • 24% of firms cited challenges around having insufficient resources within their business to communicate with employees about pensions (CBI)

  • 51% of businesses offer a digital information portal for staff and 49% deliver in-house webinars/seminars (CBI)

  • Companies’ top 3 challenges are training (44%), planning and budgeting (38%) and technology (37%) (Catalant)

  • To overcome technology gaps, employers said they plan to adopt change management strategies and new technologies to attract specialized or highly skilled talent (75%), find talent that can do the work faster (62%), speed up talent acquisition (57%) and reduce reliance on costly brand-name consulting firms (40%) (Catalant)

  • 70% of executives say employees’ desire for purpose is impacting HR’s ability to recruit and retain top talent (69%), and 65% report it is transforming traditional approaches to talent recruitment and development, including compensation packages (Covestro)

  • 68% of executives believe their employees would be more engaged in their work and perform at higher levels if they had opportunities to be challenged by working on purpose projects inside and/or outside the company (Covestro)

  • 62% of executives see SBV (small teams of employees engaging in short-term consulting projects that aid nonprofit organizations and their causes) as a way to attract top talent, increase employee engagement (70%), and develop future leaders at their companies (80%) (Covestro)

  • 75% of executives believe that in the next decade, in order to recruit and retain talent, compensation alone will not be enough (Covestro)

  • Roughly 70% of executives indicate that over the last 5 years they’ve seen an increase in the number of Millennials (71%), Gen Xers (69%) and Baby Boomers (46%) who want the opportunity for more social purpose work while on the job (Covestro)

  • 71% of executives say employees’ desire for purpose is prompting HR to rethink certain work policies and 67% say its compelling HR to work more closely with corporate social responsibility to create new policies and programs that give employees the opportunities to get involved in social projects (Covestro)

  • 83% of executives believe skills-based volunteerism (small teams of employees engaging in short-term consulting projects that aid nonprofit organizations and their causes) could help employees satisfy their desire for purpose and hone their teamwork and/or leadership abilities, develop new skills and/or strengthen existing ones (77%), and become more engaged and productive in their own work (67%) (Covestro)

  • Only 26% of executives say their companies have utilized skills-based volunteerism (Covestro)

  • Organizations with poorly handled onboarding are twice as likely to cause new hires to seek new opportunities in the near future (Digitate)

  • The new hire onboard experience sets a tone which, if negative, can leave 25% of new hires unlikely to recommend the employer to a family member or friend (Digitate)

  • 60% of professionals expressed an optimism that automation may benefit their employees (Digitate)

New Call-to-action2018 Employee Perks and Other Miscellaneous Benefits Stats

  • 42% of full-time employees have no employee perks at all (Clutch)

  • 53% of those who do have employee perks say that those perks give them a better quality of life (Clutch)

  • 66% of employees who receive perks are satisfied with them (Clutch)

  • 80% of employees who ranked their benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high also ranked job satisfaction as extremely or very high (EBRI)

  • Nearly two-thirds of employees who ranked benefits satisfaction as extremely or very high ranked their moral as excellent or very good (EBRI)

  • 49% of employees say that receiving perks/benefits means they know that their employers are invested in them as individuals (Clutch)

  • 28% of employees signed up for voluntary benefits during 2017 (Employee Benefit Adviser)

  • Voluntary benefits will meet employees’ diverse needs, from serious illness and identity theft (a 56% increase) and pet insurance (80%) (Benefitfocus)

  • There’s been a 138% increase in the share of employers offering at least three voluntary benefits since 2016 (Benefitfocus)

  • 51% of employers plan to increase their investments in on-site benefits (Randstad)

  • 42% of companies reduced the number of investment options they offer to plan participants over the past three years, and another 41% plan to do so by 2020 (WTW)

  • 59% of employees report that their employers offered dental insurance in 2017, up from 54% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 84% of workers want help in getting disability insurance, compared with 71% of employers (Alight Solutions)

  • Gen Xers and Boomers focus more on disability insurance (50% and 63%) vs their younger coworkers (33%) (LIMRA)

  • 29% of employees report their employers offered long-term disability in 2017, down from 32% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 36% of employees report their employers offered short-term disability in 2017, down from 39% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 50% of employees report that their employers offered life insurance in 2017, up from 47% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 81% of workers want help getting life insurance, while just 68% of employers think they should provide that help (Alight Solutions)

  • 15% of employers offer accident insurance in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 50% of workers want help getting identity protection services (Alight Solutions)

  • 21% of full-time workers receive paid parental leave (Clutch)

  • 40% of millennials see parental leave as an important benefit (LIMRA)

  • 8% of full-time workers receive some kind of childcare stipend (Clutch)

  • 23% of women would take day-care services into heavy consideration when choosing a job (Fractl)

  • 24% of women would take paid maternity leave into heavy consideration when choosing a job (Fractl)

  • 45% of employees report their employers offered paid maternity leave in 2017 (EBRI)

  • 11% of men would take day-care services into heavy consideration when choosing a job (Fractl)

  • 14% of men would take paid paternity leave into heavy consideration when choosing a job (Fractl)

  • 26% of employees report their employers offered paid paternity leave in 2017 (EBRI)

  • Workers ages 18-34 said career development matters most in accepting a job offer, while workers 55+ cited paid time off as their top factor (Accountemps)

  • 25% of full-time employees have paid professional development (Clutch)

  • 29% of employees said their organization has a formal mentoring program and 37% said they have an informal one (Association for Talent Development)

  • 71% of Fortune 500 companies have formal mentorship programs (ATD)

  • 90% of workers participating in a mentoring program said it helped them develop a positive relationship with another individual in the company (River)

  • 89% of workers participating in a mentoring program said it allowed them to contribute to the success of their company (River)

  • 94% of workers participating in a mentoring program believe that a mentoring program demonstrates an organization’s commitment to provide career options and opportunities (River)

  • 83% of workers participating in a mentoring program admitted that their experience positively influenced their desire to stay at their organization (River)

  • 28% of employees said their employers offer mentorship or leadership programs geared toward women (Randstad)

  • To foster diversity in the workplace, 49% of minority cybersecurity professionals said mentorship programs are very important (ISC)²

  • Employers are starting to support part-time workers with maternity and child care benefits, including unpaid leave (52%), adoption or surrogacy stipends (34%) and childcare support (23%) (WTW)

  • 21% of employers offer an app-based mobile phone fertility or maternity program, with 16% offering it through the health plan and 5% through other vendors (WTW)

  • 66% of employers say they expect to offer fertility benefits by 2019 (WTW)

  • Fertility coverage for same-sex couples will hit 81% among employers offering fertility benefits by 2019 (WTW)

  • 82% of businesses that currently offer fertility coverage say they will make no changes in 2018; 17% expect to enhance offerings and 1% plan to decrease benefits (WTW)

  • 81% of employers already offering financial assistance said the benefit would apply to same-sex couples next year, compared with 65% in 2017 (WTW)

  • 49% of employees report that their employers offered vision insurance in 2017, up from 44% in 2013 (EBRI)

  • 76% of employees are enrolled in a vision benefits plan (Transitions Optical)

  • The enrollment breakdown for vision care by generation is: Boomers (84%), Gen X (80%), Millennials (75%) and Gen Z (50%) (Transitions Optical)

  • 52% of employees say they understand their health benefits and 43% indicate they understand their non-health benefits very/extremely well (EBRI)

  • 31% of employees indicate their employer or benefits company provides no education or advice on benefits (EBRI)

  • 39% of employees state that their employer provides education on how health insurance works, 24% say that their employer provides education n how a health savings account works, and 28% confirm that their employer offers education on how to invest money in their retirement plan (EBRI)

  • 48% of millennials report education benefits as an important employer-provided benefit (LIMRA)

  • 34% of Gen Xers and 20% of boomers consider education benefits important (LIMRA)

  • 31% of employees were offered no formal training in 2016 (Axonify)

  • Among managers who oversee one to two employees, 59% report having no training at all, the same measure stands at 41% among managers who overs see three to five workers (West Monroe Partners)

  • 42% of new managers admit they developed their style by observing and mimicking a previous manager rather than through any type formal training (West Monroe Partners)

  • Nearly half of managers who had 10+ years of managerial experience said they’ve only received about nine total hours of training and 43% who have been manager for less than one year have had no training (West Monroe Partners)

  • 43% of employees who received training found it to be ineffective (Axonify)

  • 93% of employees want training that is easy to complete/understand, 91% want it to be personalized/relevant, and 90% want it to be engaging/fun (Axonify)

  • 89% of employees want training anytime/anywhere they need to do their job, 85% want to be able to choose the training times that fit their schedule, and 80% believe frequent/regular training is more important than formal workplace training (Axonify)

  • Businesses with a strong learning culture enjoy employee engagement and retention rates around 30-50% higher than those that don’t (Robert Half)

  • 47% of organizations run training and development programs to help build employees’ skills and support career development (Robert Half)

  • 67% of Gen X leaders said they would like more external coaching and 57% want external development (DDI)

  • 80% of employees see significant opportunity for artificial intelligence to create a more engaging and empowering workplace experience, yet admit a lack of transparency from their employers is a primary driver of fear and concern (The Workforce Institute)

  • 64% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it simplified or automated time consuming internal processes (Coleman)

  • 64% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it helped better balance their workload (Coleman)

  • 62% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it increased fairness in subjective decisions (Coleman)

  • 57% of employees would welcome artificial intelligence if it ensured managers made better choices affecting individual employees (Coleman)

  • 62% of U.S. employees felt artificial intelligence would simplify time consuming processes, and better balance their workload (64%) (Coleman)

  • 88% of global Gen Z employees believe artificial intelligence can improve their job in some manner, but just 70% of baby boomers feel the same way (Coleman)

  • 48% U.S. Gen Z employees see the biggest benefit of artificial intelligence as its ability to create an overall fairer working environment (Coleman)

  • 38% of U.S. baby boomer employees either don’t think or aren’t sure how artificial intelligence would improve their job (Coleman)

  • While 82% of employees see opportunity for artificial intelligence to improve their jobs, 34% expressed concern that AI could someday replace them altogether, including 42% of Gen Z employees (Coleman)

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Topics: Employee Engagement + Loyalty, Benefits Trends

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