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Boston University School of LawLast year the unemployment rate dropped to a nearly 50-year low, making it harder than ever to find, hire and keep good talent. And it looks like this sentiment is carrying over into 2019.

So what will employers do to recruit and retain?

What is it that employees want from their employer? What makes them loyal?

This is where we come in. We'll be gathering all the employee loyalty and engagement statistics we can get our hands on to help answer these questions.

Check the stats out here:

Of course, all of these statistics will also find their way onto our Ultimate Collection of Employee Engagement & Loyalty Statistics.

Stats related to Millennials will also be added to our database of Millennial Employee Engagement & Loyalty Statistics.

Looking for employee benefits and perks stats? We've got those too.

Have data you'd like to see on these pages? Drop us a link in the comments.

This page is brought to you courtesy of Access Perks, provider of America's best employee discount programs. Visit our site to learn more!

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2019 Employee Engagement/Retention Statistics

  • More than a third of workers are searching actively or casually for a job (Ceridian)
  • 36% of workers would consider a position if it presented itself, and only 27% said they are not interested in a job outside their current company (Ceridian)
  • 32% of employees said they need to leave their job to move forward in their career (Ceridian)
  • Employees are 55% more likely to leave their jobs in the coming year, 32% more likely to feel dissatisfied in their jobs and 18% less likely to feel cared about by their employer (Colonial Life)

  • 67% of workers consider leaving their job if work arrangements became more rigid (Staples)

  • Nearly half of workers have left a job because it didn’t align with their expectations (ThriveMap)

  • 48% of workers left their job because it wasn’t what they thought it would be (ThriveMap)

  • 73% of Gen Z workers left their job for not meeting their expectations (ThriveMap)

  • Nearly a third of millennials say they’ll be chasing higher salaries at another employer five years from now (Staples)

  • 79% of employees would not accept a job with a higher salary from a company that failed to act in response to a report of sexual harassment (The Manifest)

  • 76% of employees wouldn’t join a company offering a higher salary that sells users’ data without users’ knowledge (The Manifest)

  • Half of employees would sacrifice their salary, as much as 29% of it, to work a job they enjoy (Kforce)

  • Money remains the top reason workers quit their jobs, but it’s not always what attracts them to a new opportunity (PayScale)

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  • About 50% of female workers and 35% of male workers said not earning enough money is the top reason they’re unhappy with their employers (Ceridian)

  • 25% of employees cited a bigger paycheck as the top reason for quitting their job, but 27% said the opportunity to do more meaningful work is why they accepted a new position (PayScale)

  • Less than one-fifth of employees said they were unhappy at their current organization, while the same number said increased responsibilities drove them to a new job or that more pay was the key driver for switching jobs (PayScale)

  • Women were 11% more likely than men to say flexible work options drove them to a new job, and millennials were 9% more likely to leave a job for more money than boomers (PayScale)

  • 72% of employees wouldn’t accept an employer that endangers the environment (The Manifest)

  • 69% of employees won’t accept companies that lobby against consumer protection regulations (The Manifest)

  • 68% of employees would consider leaving their job if they didn’t feel supported by more senior employees (Staples)

  • 63% of employees wouldn’t accept a job without first knowing that the organization is actively inclusive of women, minorities and people with disabilities (Staples)

  • 75% of employees are happy at work, but nearly 8 in 10 said they’re likely to leave in search of another position after just one bad day on the job (Addison Group)

  • 81% of job seekers cited dissatisfaction with the work environment as the major reason they started look elsewhere for work (Addison Group)

  • 75% of job seekers said being passed over for a promotion was a reason to go job hunting (Addison Group)

  • 66% of professional employees plan not to stay at their current company long term (ExecuSearch)
  • 70% of staff members would be at least somewhat likely to leave their current organizations and take a job with one that is known for investing in employee development and learning (The Harris Poll)

  • Among employees who left their previous job, 34% said finding a new job with more career development opportunities spurred them on (The Harris Poll)

  • Career development ranked 2nd to compensation as the reason employees left their organizations (The Harris Poll)

  • More than 80% of employees would quit their jobs for better development opportunities (ExecuSearch)
  • 61% of U.S. adults look for career development opportunities when considering employment opportunities (Jobvite)

  • 40% of Gen Z workers said they regret accepting a job offer (Gartner)

  • More than 50% of workers envision themselves being in a long-term career at an organization, and more than a third who regret accepting a job offer planned to quit within 12 months (Gartner)

  • More than half of employees were willing to go to a competing firm in search of a better culture, and 48% said they’d consider working a 60 hour week in exchange for a better culture (Speakap)

  • Employees said managerial support was the most important aspect of company culture and 71% would quit if another employer offered them flexible scheduling in a new job (ExecuSearch)
  • 38% of younger employees ages 18-25 and 34% of employees ages 51-55 were most likely to quit their job because of a co-worker (Comparably)
  • 86% of employees said it is important for employers to provide learning opportunities (Ceridian)
  • More than 35% of 18-34 year olds ranked compensation as the top motivating factor to leave their job (Ceridian)
  • 73% of U.S. workers said health and wellness programs are a consideration in deciding whether to work for a company (OfficeTeam)
  • 87% of U.S. workers ages 18-34, 70% ages 35-54, and 44% ages 55+ factor in health and wellness offerings in their job decisions (OfficeTeam)
  • 79% of men and 65% of women consider health and wellness in their employment decisions (OfficeTeam)
  • 51% of employees admitted increased expenses around the holiday inspire them to look for jobs with greater financial opportunity (Allegis)
  • 62% of employees said they planned to increase their job search efforts in 2019 (Allegis)
  • 83% of HR professionals struggled with recruiting suitable candidates in the past 12 months (SHRM)

  • 52% of HR professionals said the skills gap has worsened in the past two years, and 83% said the quality of job applicants decreased (SHRM)

  • 93% of employers are actively taking steps to address the talent shortage (SunTrust)

  • 45% of employers have raised pay rates in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 43% of employers increased benefits in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 36% of employers offered more flexible work arrangements in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 80% of workers say they would choose to work a job with a flexible work option over one without (IWG)

  • 81% of employers say expanding the talent pool is the key motivator for adopting flexible work policies (IWG)

  • 23% of employers offered additional recognition programs in order to stay competitive attracting and retaining talent (SunTrust)

  • 17% of employers offered college loan repayment and/or college savings programs to combat the talent shortage (SunTrust)

  • 40% of employers plan to fill current and future openings with full-time workers, and 47% plan to hire part-time workers going into 2019 (CareerBuilder)

  • 50% of HR managers have current openings for which they can’t find qualified candidates (CareerBuilder)

  • 32% of workers are looking to change jobs in 2019, citing low pay or a lack of benefits (15%) and poor company culture (10%) as the reasons (CareerBuilder)

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  • More than 25% of HR professionals said their organizations partner with schools to create a pipeline of candidates, but nearly half said the education system has done little to remedy the problem (SHRM)

  • More than 60% of employers said it’s difficult to find skilled workers, a little less than half said the same about meeting compensation requirements, and about the same amount have struggled to identify diverse candidates (LaSalle)
  • 49% of employers said it was a challenge to find candidates with hard skills, and 51% experience difficulty in looking for employees with soft skills (LaSalle)
  • 74% of employers said they plan to increase staffing, with 67% stating they plan to add 1- 50 jobs (LaSalle)
  • 90% of CFOs said the competitive hiring environment is complicating their companies’ ability to recruit talent (Robert Half)

  • 64% of HR professionals said sourcing quality applicants was challenging (XpertHR)
  • More than half of HR professionals reported being challenged by making sure workers and supervisors have the skills needed now and in the future, and about the same amount of people have been challenged by increasing employee engagement, morale and satisfaction (49%) and retaining employees (40%) (XpertHR)
  • Employers believe some of the most challenging issues in the year ahead are:
    • Attracting strong, competent management and dedicated, capable staff (33%);
    • Offering competitive compensation and benefits (31%)
    • High employee turnover (26%)
    • Developing employees and future leaders for succession (23%)
    • Managing the hiring process and tracking applicants (16%) (Oasis)
  • A company’s equitable resolution of issues will affect voluntary turnover 2.5 times more than it impacts engagement (Globalization Partners)
  • Nearly 1.4 million U.S. workers could lose their jobs over the next decade due to technological change (WEF)
  • Almost 75% of HR professionals said their organizations currently use technology-driven HR initiatives, and 75% have turnover rates averaging up to 30% a year (Speakap)

  • Almost 25% of U.S. workers were actively look for another job, a 7.6% increase from last quarter but still lower than the global average of 27% (Gartner)

  • 43% of U.S. workers expressed high intent to stay with their current employers, a slight decrease from 4Q18 but significantly higher than the global average of 33% (Gartner)

  • Organizations with attractive EVPs can reduce the compensation premium needed to attract qualified candidates as well as potentially decrease annual employee turnover by just under 70% (Gartner)

  • The cost of retraining workers from current roles to new, viable, desirable and growing roles would be $34 billion in total or $24,800 per worker on average (WEF)
  • Private-sector employers could profitably reskill 25% of at-risk workers, 45% by collaborating with stakeholders and the government could assist as many as 77% of all at-risk workers (WEF)
  • About 2% of long-term workers left their jobs the year automation spiked at their company, rising to 8.5% after about 5 years (Boston University School of Law)

  • Nearly 50% of companies expect automation to lead to a reduction in their full-time workforce by 2020 (WEF)
  • 87% of employers said they planned to maintain or increase their head counts because of automation (Manpower Group)

  • About 25% of job seekers are worried their job will be automated within five years, up from 15% in 2017 (Jobvite)

  • 94% of senior managers would rehire ex-employees who left their companies on good terms (Accountemps)

  • 52% of workers would apply for a job with a previous employer (Accountemps)

  • Reasons cited for not wanting to work for a former employer: dissatisfaction with leadership (22%), didn’t fit organizational culture (17%), unfulfilling duties (13%) and bridges burned by the company (11%) (Accountemps)

  • About 14% of job seekers didn’t feel respected throughout their most recent job search (Monster)

  • 77% of employees thought there were threats to their current job like new management (20%), toxic boss or working environment (19%), layoffs (17%), recession (16%) and younger coworkers (15%) (Monster)

  • Tech employers account for 10% of the nation’s jobs and 86% of recruiters and hiring managers still have trouble filling tech openings (Indeed)

  • 57% of tech workers said they’ve previously moved for a new job and 80% have thought about moving for a job at some point (Indeed)

  • 60% of men and 53% of women have moved for a job (Indeed)

  • Reasons workers move for a job include better career opportunities (65%), desire for a change (44%) or fresh start (40%) and lower costs of living in other locations (33%) (Indeed)

  • 62% of workers would relocate for a job opportunity (Robert Half)

  • 76% of Professionals ages 18-34 are more likely to relocate vs. 62% of those ages 35-54 and 40% age 55+ (Robert Half)

  • Almost three-quarters of employees would be more likely to work for a company with a green footprint (Swytch)

  • A little less than half of employees would accept a smaller salary to work for an environmentally friendly and socially responsible employer (Swytch)

  • More than 90% of workers in each age group think it’s important for an organization to be socially responsible (Paychex)

  • More than 10% of employees would take a salary decrease of $5,000-$10,000 each year and 3% would accept a decrease of more than $10,000 to work at an environmentally friendly and socially responsible employer (Swytch)

  • About 40% of millennials have taken one job over another because of a company’s sustainability (Swytch)

  • 70% of millennials said a company’s sustainability would impact their decision to stay with a company for the long haul (Swytch)

  • The number of employers concerned about retention rose by 7% since 2018 (PayScale)

  • 71% of workers are engaged at work (The Predictive Index)

  • When employers use assessments and workers have access to the results, engagement is 87%, versus 64% for those without access (The Predictive Index)

  • Engagement is higher at companies five years old or younger (77%) than older ones that are more than 30 years old (68%) (The Predictive Index)

  • 84% of employees aren’t fully engaged at work (ADP Research)

  • 21% of gig workers were fully engaged compared to just 15% of full-time employees (ADP Research)

  • 29% of virtual workers were fully engaged compared to 18% of employees who work in an office (ADP Research)

  • Workers with a higher level of education were more likely to be fully engaged than those without a college degree, and C-suite and VP-level executives were more likely to be fully engaged than mid-level team leaders and those at the first-level of team leadership (ADP Research)

  • 15% of adult employees are engaged with their employers, although organizations globally invest $18 billion per year on tools to boost engagement (ITA Group)

  • 65% of employees plan to stay in their current jobs despite disengagement at work (Achievers)

  • 20.8% of employees consider themselves very engaged, 16.3% are fully engaged and 31.3% are engaged but feel their company could do more to improve employee experience (Achievers)

  • 34.7% of workers plan to look for a new job in 2019, down from 74% last year (Achievers)

  • 70.1% of employees do not consider themselves very engaged (Achievers)

  • 18.6% of employees haven’t even decided if they’ll look for a new job yet (Achievers)

  • 31.6% of employees said they have average engagement in their current job (Achievers)

  • 14% of employees said the main reason they would change jobs is because they aren’t engaged (Achievers)

  • 54.2% of employees would leave their job for a pay raise, career advancement (37.8%) and for better corporate benefits (20.7%) (Achievers)

  • 26% of employees ranked recognition for their work in their top three factors for staying with their current employer, but 17% said their manager/employer was horrible – they never recognized their work and 43% ranked their manager/employer as just okay – recognizing them annually or quarterly at least (Achievers)

  • 70% of workers stress about their health, jobs and finances, and more than 20% spend at least five hours each week thinking about these stressors during their working hours (Colonial Life)

  • 50% of workers said they lose between one and five hours of work time each week due to stress (Colonial Life)

  • When workers are stressed, 41% feel less productive, 33% feel less engaged, 15% said stress made them look for a new job and 14% said it made them absent more frequently (Colonial Life)

  • More than 60% of 18-34 year olds said their productivity at work suffers due to stress over poor work-life balance or unrealistic professional demands (MHA/Total Brain)

  • More than a third of Americans said emails, text messages and social media updates helped make them mentally unproductive at work (MHA/Total Brain)

  • About 10% more men than women said they love their jobs (Kforce)

  • 60% of employees said they would be more loyal to a company that helped cover prenatal care, family planning and abortion care (NARAL Pro-Choice America)

  • 45% of job seekers said it’s become harder to find a job this year, despite low unemployment numbers (Jobvite)

  • Nearly 20% of Americans age 65+ are employed or actively looking for work, up from less than 12% about 20 years ago (Associated Press)

  • Hourly workers are twice as interested in earning a promotion at their current employer via their work experience rather than in changing jobs to climb the ladder (Branch)

  • Hourly workers prefer to be developed for advancement internally rather than look elsewhere for career growth opportunities (Branch)
  • About half of HR leaders said it’s difficult to find hires, including those that fit the company culture (Paychex)

2019 Workplace Satisfaction Statistics

  • 65% of millennials are satisfied in their current jobs (LaSalle)
  • 62% of millennials are generally satisfied with their benefits, and 63% with their company culture (LaSalle)
  • 72% of employees said having more work benefits would increase job satisfaction (Zoro)

  • 10.8% of workers call their manager/employer awesome and are recognized weekly and 29.4% call them pretty good and are recognized at least once a month (Achievers)

  • 31.3% of employees who considered themselves engaged said their employer could do more to improve the employee experience (Achievers)

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  • 74% of employees say workplace culture is important to them (Speakap)

  • 40% of employees reported having a positive work culture at their company (Speakap)

  • 19% of employees said being invited to join employee communications apps before their first workday would make them feel connected within a company’s culture (Speakap)

  • Employees said the most important attributes of a strong company culture are respect and fairness (39%), trust and integrity (23%), and teamwork (9%) (Speakap)

  • 9% of employees said leadership is very committed to improving company culture and employee experience (Achievers)

  • 38% of employees have either never heard senior leadership talk about culture or they talk about it, but there’s no action to back it up, 31.4% call senior leadership average – they are reactive but not proactive (Achievers)

  • 77% of employees agree a strong culture allows them to do their best work, 76% see the impact in productivity and efficiency, and another 74% draw a correlation between culture and their ability to serve their customer base (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • Only about 25% of employees said their organization has a strong culture based on core values and a similar amount said they trust their leadership at the executive level (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • 16.3% of employees said their manager was horrible at soliciting feedback on their employee experience and 40% rated them okay – they ask for feedback only once or twice a year (Achievers)

  • When it came to acting on feedback, workers ranked managers/employers even worse – 42.3% said they’re okay – they make a few changes based on it but 21.4% said they never do anything with feedback (Achievers)

  • 14% of employees said they would like more training or learning opportunities to improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 9% of employees said more paid time off would most improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 41% of employees said a higher salary would improve their job satisfaction (CNBC)

  • 25% of workers say they are very well paid and 48% say they are somewhat well paid (CNBC)

  • 40% of workers give their companies a negative rating on how well they help their employees advance their careers (CNBC)

  • 47% of employees feel underpaid, 44% are dissatisfied with benefits and 43% feel unsatisfied with their career path (Addison Group)

  • Reasons employees value their work and are loyal to their employer include the work they perform (55%), salary (50%) and immediate supervisor (39%) (Addison Group)

  • 89% of employees said disjointed digital communication tanks employee morale, lowers productivity and impacts customer satisfaction and the bottom line (RingCentral)

  • 75% of employees said disjointed communications tech complicates how they collaborate with colleagues, frustrates their productivity and makes them unhappy at work (RingCentral)

  • 92% of employees said a seamless platform would allow them to connect to and communicate with co-workers and customers, which would raise job satisfaction (RingCentral)

  • 86% of employees said a seamless platform would raise a company’s profitability and 83% said it would entice them to stay longer at a company (RingCentral)

  • 45% of millennials are pleased with their career path, and 49% with training and development programs at their company (LaSalle)
  • Slightly more than half of employees feel they make an impact on overall business goals (Ceridian)
  • 39% of employees rated themselves as unhappy about their rewards, 26% are happy and 33% are neutral (Peakon)

  • 36% of employees are satisfied with their workload, 39% are neutral and 24% are unhappy (Peakon)

  • 36% of employees are satisfied with their career growth, 33% are neutral and 29% dissatisfied (Peakon)

  • 58% of employees are happy with the support they receive from management, 14% are unhappy and 26% are neutral (Peakon)

  • 80% of college graduates consider a sense of purpose either very important or extremely important to their work (Gallup)

  • Less than 50% of grads reported successfully finding purposeful work post-graduation (Gallup)

  • 90% of workers agree that they have a source of meaning in their careers (Udemy)

  • 14% of U.S. workers found “contributing to the greater good” as a contributor to finding meaning in their work (Udemy)

  • 47% of workers felt happy with the meaningfulness of their work, 35% are unsure and 17% are unhappy (Peakon)

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  • 5% of employees don’t think their contributions make any kind of difference, while 44% do not understand their impact or are unaware of business goals (Ceridian)
  • 86% of all workers, 39% ages 18-34, 54% ages 45-55 and 50% ages 65+ believe burnout is connected to job satisfaction (University of Phoenix)
  • More than half of employees have experienced job burnout (University of Phoenix)
  • Almost 70% of employees said their companies occasionally struggle in aligning with, being sensitive about and adhering to local laws, practices and cultures (Globalization Partners)
  • One-third of workers are not confident in their ability to perform their jobs (Docebo)

  • 75% of Gen Z employees want a boss who coaches employees (InsideOut)

  • 32% of workers felt unqualified to do their job, and 33% fear their boss or colleagues agree (Docebo)

  • 52% of workers have a co-worker who isn’t qualified to perform the work he or she is assigned (Docebo)

  • 33% of Americans say employer-provided training doesn’t meet their expectations (Docebo)

  • One in three workers said their employer’s training is out-of-date (Docebo)

  • Nearly 25% of workers feel their lack of qualifications could result in their being let go, something workers said worries them at least once a month (Docebo)

  • In the U.S., 32% of workers said training is critical (Docebo)

  • 36% of workers and nearly half of millennials would consider quitting a job that didn’t provide learning opportunities (Docebo)

  • 31% of employers are very satisfied with their recruitment process (Allegis)

  • 80% of employees said the onboarding process was an important moment at work – yet 1 in 3 would prefer to go on an awkward first date rather than attend onboarding or orientation for a new job (ServiceNow)
  • About 80% of workers experienced some issues when starting a new job (ServiceNow)
  • One-third of workers said they received no necessary training, while 28% were unsure of their responsibilities and goals (ServiceNow)
  • Around 25% of workers said they received no clear onboarding, while roughly the same amount admitted to IT issues (ServiceNow)
  • Nearly 20% of workers believed they were not fully onboarded after three months on the job (ServiceNow)
  • 58% of new hires ask for a walk-through of key processes or want a buddy they can turn to for questions (ServiceNow)
  • One in ten new hires reported their company forgot it was their first day on the job (ServiceNow)
  • When the onboarding experience is not positive, new hires are twice as likely to quit their job compared to those who have a good onboarding experience (ServiceNow)
  • 62% of C-level executives said their organizations are using new technologies to collect data on their workers, but less than one-third think they’re using the data responsibly (Accenture)

  • More than half of workers said using new sources of workforce data can damage trust, but 92% are open to their company collecting data on their work if it improves their performance or well-being or generates personal benefits (Accenture)

  • Almost two-thirds of employees said recent scandals over the misuse of data has them worried that their employee data will be compromised (Accenture)

  • Three in five workers have agreed to take on more tasks than they can actually get done on their to-do lists (VitalSmarts)

  • One in five workers said they’ve reached their limit and can’t commit themselves to doing more and one in three always have more things on their to-do lists than they can get done (VitalSmarts)

  • 60% of workers have more than 60 personal and work-related tasks to accomplish each week, while 15% have more than 100 tasks (VitalSmarts)

  • 73% of workers say their to-do lists become overgrown because they want to be accommodating, helpful and polite; 56% because they have a tendency to solve problems; 39% because no clear limits or rules about which tasks they should accept or reject exist (VitalSmarts)

  • 50% of workers are moderately stressed, while 35% are highly stressed and 9% are highly stressed (VitalSmarts)

  • 52% of workers worry about disappointing themselves or others and 20% said they regret taking on so many tasks in the first place (VitalSmarts)

  • 94% of workers reported high levels of work-related stress and 54% said stress caused them to lose sleep (VitalSmarts)

  • Half of employees have cried at work because of stress (Ginger)

  • 83% of workers experienced stress at least once a week (Ginger)

  • Half of workers reported missing a minimum of one workday out of a 12 month period because of stress (Ginger)

  • Gen Z, manual workers, low-wage earners and workers from densely-populated areas reported experiencing the highest levels of extreme stress (Ginger)

  • 81% of workers said that stress negatively affects their work, with symptoms ranging from fatigue and anxiety to physical ailments, causing them to miss work (Ginger)

  • 21% of full-time and part-time workers strongly agreed their team enthusiastically embraces change (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • 28% of workers strongly agreed their teams have a stated purpose (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • About 25% of workers strongly agreed their teammates are highly dedicated to the team’s work, and 29% strongly agreed that they trust their teammates (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • On team performance, only 21% of workers strongly believed their team regularly meets its goals and 24% strongly agreed their team constantly learns and improves (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • Workers cited team leaders (46%) as the most important influencers for change, while far fewer believed their teammates (25%) and the C-suite (12%) inspire the most change (Eagle Hill Consulting)

  • A majority of workers like their job (70%), their co-workers (69%) and their direct managers (64%) (The Predictive Index)

  • 60% of workers said they are happy with their employer (The Predictive Index)

  • 88% of full-time American staffers describe themselves as happy at work (Wrike)

  • 71% of workers are mostly happy at work, while 17% are elated (Wrike)

  • Workers with access to collaborative work management software were 85% more likely to identify as happy in the workplace (Wrike)

  • Workers who identified as happy were 55% more likely to rate their company as above average when it comes to diversity (Wrike)

  • Happy employees are three times more likely to attend after-work events and 25% more likely to eat lunch with co-workers (Wrike)

  • Happy employees are 91% more likely to describe their relationship with their manager as being very good (Wrike)

  • People who work on an on-call basis were less likely to report feeling happy (University of California – Berkeley & San Francisco)

  • Workers who had more than 2 weeks notice of their schedule had a nearly 75% likelihood of experiencing happiness (University of California – Berkeley & San Francisco)

  • Workers who had two days notice of their schedule or less had a 65% probability of being happy (University of California – Berkeley & San Francisco)

  • 25% of corporate professionals believe their jobs are more secure than those within the U.S. government, but 89% still prefer to work in the private sector (Korn Ferry)

  • Nearly two-thirds of businesses were worried the partial government shutdown would have a negative impact on their business (Korn Ferry)

  • Nearly half of businesses said the partial government shutdown affected their employees’ morale and 31% said it affected employees’ productivity (Korn Ferry)

  • 70% of corporate professionals believe federal workers would be less engaged after returning to work after the partial government shutdown compared to 87% who said employees in their own organizations would be less motivated after returning to work following a work stoppage or strike (Korn Ferry)

  • 75% of corporate professionals weren’t worried that job competition would increase as a result of government employees looking for new opportunities in the private sector during the partial government shutdown (Korn Ferry)

  • Employees aren’t thrilled with the open office design, with 52% saying there are distractions created by an open office layout and 40% say their office space is too open (Staples)

  • Two-thirds of employees with disabilities say their office space is physically supportive compared to 82% of workers with no disability (Staples)

  • 77% of employees without disabilities say their office spaces enable productivity, but just 64% of employees with disabilities agree (Staples)

  • 80% of employees say their offices are set up in a way that allows them to be efficient (Staples)

  • 73% of employees say their offices help them be better at what they do (Staples)

  • Almost 40% of workers said messaging apps’ 24/7 messaging capabilities and social media connections complicated their ability to maintain work-life balance (Speakap)

  • 12% of workers using messaging apps expressed worry that sensitive data could be exposed by data breaches (Speakap)

  • 25% of workers said work-life balance is the most important aspect of how their company connects with them (Speakap)

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  • Roughly 25% of Gen Z, 18% of Millennials, 16% of Gen X and 12% of Boomers are dissatisfied with their work-life balance (Stanford University)

  • 10% of Gen Z and 9% of Millennials say that stress accumulated during work hours affects their personal life to a great extent (Stanford University)

  • 85% of employees said employer technology should provide a simple, intuitive user experience (Paychex)

  • 49% of Gen Z employees said employers can do more to promote inclusion in the workplace (InsideOut)

  • About 80% of people who worked from home said they felt isolated from others at least a little of the time (Amerisleep)

  • Roughly 76% of people who worked from home reported feeling left out at least a little of the time (Amerisleep)

  • 57% of remote workers were more likely than the average American to be satisfied with their job (Amerisleep)

  • Over 80% of remote workers reported high job satisfaction (Amerisleep)

  • Employees cited the top five office weaknesses as poor communication/feedback, employee retention, staff diversity/inclusion, lack of transparency, and health and safety (Kforce)

  • Top three factors employees said they value are trust, passion and mentorship (Kforce)

  • About two-thirds of full-time employees ages 25+ believe women’s reproductive freedom is key to their success in the workplace, and that companies should publicly show their support for women’s reproductive rights (NARAL Pro-Choice America)

  • Just one or two underperforming workers can jeopardize an entire team’s success (VitalSmarts)

  • When a worker fails to prioritize project tasks, misses deadlines and generally underperforms, teams can lose as much as 24% of their productivity (VitalSmarts)

  • 94% of workers said teammates lose track of things or miss deadlines because they fail to capture commitments and ideas, almost the same amount said a couple teammates spent too much time on the wrong priority, and around 40% of managers make similar mistakes (VitalSmarts)

  • 76% of stay-at-home parents said they try to stay connected to their careers, while 24% said they’d completely disconnected from their previous careers (Flexjobs)

  • 70% of millennials believe they may only have some or few of the skills that will be required to succeed in the future of work (Deloitte)

  • The number of employers with “deeply-embedded” recognition programs increased to 17% in 2019 from 10% in 2015 (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • The number of employers with no recognition policies increased to 19% in 2019 from 12% in 2015 (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • About 50% of senior managers view recognition as an investment (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • Most employers said their recognition plans are “doing a fairly good job” meeting goals, and 18% said they were “definitely meeting” their goals (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • Half of employers said HR administers their recognition programs and 25% said the compensation department handles them (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • The average organization used eight recognition programs, including length of service (72%), above-and-beyond performance (62%), customer service (34%), productivity (27%) and quality (27%) (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • 40% of organizations used biometric/wellness programs to recognize employees who reach their health goals (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • Gift cards were the most common form of employee recognition (62%), followed by clocks and watches (49%) (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • 18% of organizations give employee-of-the-month awards (Maritz & WorldatWork)

  • For more significant accomplishments, 47% of workers said they wanted to be recognized with a new growth opportunity, rather than a salary increase or high-performance rating (Deloitte)

  • Recognition from leaders above their direct supervisors would mean a lot to 37% of workers (Deloitte)

  • About 85% of professionals prefer a simple “thank you” as recognition for their day-to-day (Deloitte)

  • 37% of employees said they wanted to be recognized by leaders above their direct supervisors, while 32% preferred recognition by their direct supervisors (Deloitte)

  • More than one-third of women said they preferred company thank-you’s in writing (Deloitte)

  • 84% of employees said regular check-ins with their managers are important to them (Appraisd)

  • 90% of Gen Z said regular face-to-face meetings with their manager are important and 40% described them as very important (Appraisd)

  • One-third of employees meet with their manager once a month; 12% meet every two weeks; another 12% never meet with their managers at all; and 8% meet fewer than every six months (Appraisd)

  • Large organizations were more likely to have regular check-ins than midsize or small companies, and the number of employees that never had check-ins increased to 17% in small companies (Appraisd)

  • The annual review is still used in 36% of employees’ workplaces (Appraisd)

  • 4% of employees reported that reviews are conducted less than once a year and 8% said they’ve never had a review with their current employer (Appraisd)

  • 64% of U.S. adults said they had experienced bias in the workplace within the past year (Deloitte)

  • Among workers who experienced bias, 83% said behavior and comments were both subtle and indirect in nature (Deloitte)

  • When employees experienced or witnessed bias in the workplace 29% spoke up, and 34% ignored it (Deloitte)

  • 84% of workers said bias negatively affected their overall happiness, well-being and confidence (Deloitte)

Written by: Ashley Autry


Ashley Autry is a Marketing Professional at Access Development. She's an expert proofer, gatherer of loyalty stats, research guru, writing queen, and overseer of various marketing projects.

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